Thunder on the Mountain

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"Thunder on the Mountain" is a song written by Bob Dylan, released in 2006 as the first track on his album Modern Times .

The song, alongside "Someday Baby", has had considerable success, garnering more airtime than any other track on the album.

Dylan references his former residence, Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan and a former resident, Alicia Keys. He was inspired to write the song after admiring Keys' performance at the Grammys. [1]

The song alludes to the bible, with Dylan playing the role of the archangel Gabriel blowing his horn. [2]

Prompted by Dylan, American rockabilly singer Wanda Jackson recorded a country version of the song, produced by Jack White, that was released as a single in 2011. The name "Jerry Lee" was substituted for "Alicia Keys". [3]

Notes

  1. Margotin, Philippe; Guesdon, Jean-Michel (2015). Bob Dylan All the Songs: The Story Behind Every Track. Hachette UK. ISBN   9780316353533.
  2. Lieb, Michael; Mason, Emma; Roberts, Jonathan (2013). The Oxford Handbook of the Reception History of the Bible. OUP Oxford. p. 365. ISBN   9780199670390.
  3. "Wanda Jackson "Thunder on the Mountain"". 2011. Retrieved 16 September 2017.


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