Tomahawk, West Virginia

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Tomahawk
Unincorporated community

Tomahawk Springhouse WV.jpg

Tomahawk Springhouse
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Tomahawk
Location within the state of West Virginia
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Tomahawk
Tomahawk (the US)
Coordinates: 39°31′49″N78°2′49″W / 39.53028°N 78.04694°W / 39.53028; -78.04694 Coordinates: 39°31′49″N78°2′49″W / 39.53028°N 78.04694°W / 39.53028; -78.04694
Country United States
State West Virginia
County Berkeley
Elevation 469 ft (143 m)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
  Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
GNIS feature ID 1555816 [1]

Tomahawk is an unincorporated community on Back Creek in Berkeley County, West Virginia. [1] The community is named for a nearby series of springs in the shape of a tomahawk. [2] The community includes the historic Tomahawk Presbyterian Church, established c. 1745, and its adjacent community cemetery, which has gravestones dating to the late 18th century.

Unincorporated area Region of land not governed by own local government

In law, an unincorporated area is a region of land that is not governed by a local municipal corporation; similarly an unincorporated community is a settlement that is not governed by its own local municipal corporation, but rather is administered as part of larger administrative divisions, such as a township, parish, borough, county, city, canton, state, province or country. Occasionally, municipalities dissolve or disincorporate, which may happen if they become fiscally insolvent, and services become the responsibility of a higher administration. Widespread unincorporated communities and areas are a distinguishing feature of the United States and Canada. In most other countries of the world, there are either no unincorporated areas at all, or these are very rare; typically remote, outlying, sparsely populated or uninhabited areas.

Back Creek is a 59.5-mile-long (95.8 km) tributary of the Potomac River that flows north from Frederick County, Virginia, to Berkeley County in West Virginia's Eastern Panhandle. Back Creek originates along Frederick County's border with Hampshire County, West Virginia, at Farmer's Gap in the Great North Mountain. Its name reflects its location to the west of North Mountain. The perspective of colonists from the east in the 18th century led them to call it "Back Creek", because it lay to the back of North Mountain.

Berkeley County, West Virginia County in the United States

Berkeley County is located in the Shenandoah Valley in the Eastern Panhandle region of West Virginia in the United States. The county is part of the Hagerstown-Martinsburg, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Tomahawk Spring and the Park's Gap Bridge were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994. [3]

Tomahawk Spring

Tomahawk Spring is a historic spring house located near Martinsburg, at Tomahawk, Berkeley County, West Virginia. It was built about 1860 on the stone foundation of a previous building. It is a one-story, wood-frame structure atop a three-feet-tall stone foundation in two sections. The first section is atop the spring and is approximately 16 by 12 feet, surrounded by a lattice enclosure. The second section contains a pool and is 13 by 12 feet.

Parks Gap Bridge bridge in United States of America

Park's Gap Bridge is a historic Howe Truss bridge located near Martinsburg, at Tomahawk, Berkeley County, West Virginia. It was built in 1892, and has a span 93 feet (28 m) long and 12 feet (3.7 m) wide over Back Creek. It is a simple span pony truss supported on stone abutments.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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