Watson, Minnesota

Last updated
Watson
Chippewa County Minnesota Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Watson Highlighted.svg
Location of Watson, Minnesota
Coordinates: 45°0′37″N95°48′1″W / 45.01028°N 95.80028°W / 45.01028; -95.80028
Country United States
State Minnesota
County Chippewa
Area
[1]
  Total0.17 sq mi (0.45 km2)
  Land0.17 sq mi (0.45 km2)
  Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
1,030 ft (314 m)
Population
  Total205
  Estimate 
(2017) [3]
192
  Density1,116.28/sq mi (429.87/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
56295
Area code(s) 320
FIPS code 27-68656 [4]
GNIS feature ID0653844 [5]

Watson is a city in Chippewa County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 205 at the 2010 census. [6] Lac Qui Parle State Park is nearby.

Chippewa County, Minnesota County in the United States

Chippewa County is a county in the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 12,441. Its county seat is Montevideo. The county was formed in 1862, and was organized in 1868.

Minnesota State of the United States of America

Minnesota is a state in the Upper Midwest, Great Lakes, and northern regions of the United States. Minnesota was admitted as the 32nd U.S. state on May 11, 1858, created from the eastern half of the Minnesota Territory. The state has a large number of lakes, and is known by the slogan the "Land of 10,000 Lakes". Its official motto is L'Étoile du Nord.

2010 United States Census 23rd national census of the United States, taken in 2010

The 2010 United States Census is the twenty-third and most recent United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million, as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

Contents

History

Watson was platted in 1879 when the railroad was extended to that point. [7] [8] The city took its name from the Watson Farmers Elevator, a local grain elevator. [9] A post office has been in operation in Watson since 1879. [10]

Plat scale map showing the divisions of a piece of land

In the United States, a plat is a map, drawn to scale, showing the divisions of a piece of land. United States General Land Office surveyors drafted township plats of Public Lands Surveys to show the distance and bearing between section corners, sometimes including topographic or vegetation information. City, town or village plats show subdivisions into blocks with streets and alleys. Further refinement often splits blocks into individual lots, usually for the purpose of selling the described lots; this has become known as subdivision.

Grain elevator grain storage building

A grain elevator is an agrarian facility complex designed to stockpile or store grain. In grain trade, the term grain elevator also describes a tower containing a bucket elevator or a pneumatic conveyor, which scoops up grain from a lower level and deposits it in a silo or other storage facility.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.18 square miles (0.47 km2), all of it land. [11]

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

U.S. Route 59 and Minnesota State Highway 7 (co-signed) serves as a main route in the community.

U.S. Route 59 highway in the United States

U.S. Route 59 is a north–south United States highway. A latecomer to the U.S. numbered route system, US 59 is now a border-to-border route, part of NAFTA Corridor Highway System. It parallels U.S. Route 75 for nearly its entire route, never much more than 100 miles (160 km) away, until it veers southwest in Houston, Texas. Its number is out of place since US 59 is either concurrent with or entirely west of U.S. Route 71.

Minnesota State Highway 7 highway in Minnesota

Minnesota State Highway 7, or Trunk Highway 7, is a state highway in Minnesota, which runs from its intersection with MN 28 near Beardsley and continues east to its terminus with MN 100 and County Road 25 (CR 25) in St. Louis Park. The highway runs east–west for approximately 194.2 miles (312.5 km) through mostly rural farmland in the central part of the state. On its western end, it is part of the Minnesota River Scenic Byway where it runs northwest–southeast along the Minnesota River and associated lakes near the border with the adjoining state of South Dakota. For roughly 24 miles (39 km) of its route, it runs concurrently with U.S. Highway 59 (US 59) between Appleton and Montevideo. In Montevideo, the highway turns to the east cutting across the state. It passes through several small towns before entering the Twin Cities metropolitan area. In the metro area, MN 7 follows an expressway through several suburbs before terminating in St. Louis Park. Two different segments have been listed on the National Highway System, system of roads considered important to the country.

Concurrency (road) instance of one physical road bearing two or more different highways

A concurrency in a road network is an instance of one physical roadway bearing two or more different route numbers. When two roadways share the same right-of-way, it is sometimes called a common section or commons. Other terminology for a concurrency includes overlap, coincidence, duplex, triplex, multiplex, dual routing or triple routing.

Watson is known as "The Goose Capitol of the USA" due to the large number of Canada geese which migrate through and inhabit nearby Lac Qui Parle every fall.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1900 167
1910 152−9.0%
1920 21541.4%
1930 24614.4%
1940 29017.9%
1950 284−2.1%
1960 267−6.0%
1970 228−14.6%
1980 2384.4%
1990 211−11.3%
2000 209−0.9%
2010 205−1.9%
Est. 2017192 [3] −6.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [12]

2010 census

As of the census [2] of 2010, there were 205 people, 90 households, and 50 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,138.9 inhabitants per square mile (439.7/km2). There were 102 housing units at an average density of 566.7 per square mile (218.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.5% White, 1.0% from other races, and 0.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.5% of the population.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practice.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 90 households of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.3% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 44.4% were non-families. 37.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 3.08.

The median age in the city was 41.2 years. 28.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.5% were from 25 to 44; 30.8% were from 45 to 64; and 12.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 56.1% male and 43.9% female.

2000 census

As of the census [4] of 2000, there were 209 people, 86 households, and 52 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,186.3 people per square mile (448.3/km²). There were 98 housing units at an average density of 556.3 per square mile (210.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.69% White, 0.96% Asian, 3.35% from other races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.35% of the population.

There were 86 households out of which 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.3% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.5% were non-families. 32.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the city, the population was spread out with 28.7% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 113.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 109.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,688, and the median income for a family was $45,000. Males had a median income of $25,781 versus $21,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,617. About 7.1% of families and 13.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.3% of those under the age of eighteen and 32.0% of those sixty five or over.

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References

  1. "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jan 3, 2019.
  2. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-11-13.
  3. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  4. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. "2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 27 April 2011.
  7. "Old-timers say automobiles changed growing hamlets into ghost towns". The Hour. Nov 23, 1984. p. 55. Retrieved 28 October 2015.
  8. Upham, Warren (1920). Minnesota Geographic Names: Their Origin and Historic Significance. Minnesota Historical Society. p. 105.
  9. Heim, Michael (March 2004). Exploring America's Highways: Minnesota Trip Trivia. Exploring America's Highway. p. 234. ISBN   978-0-9744358-1-7.
  10. "Chippewa County". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 19 April 2015.
  11. "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-11-13.
  12. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.

Coordinates: 45°00′35″N95°48′05″W / 45.00972°N 95.80139°W / 45.00972; -95.80139