2007 FIFA Women's World Cup

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2007 FIFA Women's World Cup
2007年女子世界杯足球赛
2007 Nián nǚzǐ shìjièbēi zúqiú sài
2007 FIFA Women's World Cup.svg
Tournament details
Host countryChina
Dates10–30 September
Teams16 (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s)5 (in 5 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Germany.svg  Germany (2nd title)
Runners-upFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Third placeFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Fourth placeFlag of Norway.svg  Norway
Tournament statistics
Matches played32
Goals scored111 (3.47 per match)
Attendance1,190,971 (37,218 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Brazil.svg Marta (7 goals)
Best player(s) Flag of Brazil.svg Marta
Best goalkeeper Flag of Germany.svg Nadine Angerer
Fair play awardFlag of Norway.svg  Norway
2003
2011

The 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fifth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was an international association football competition for women held in China from 10 to 30 September 2007. [1] Originally, China was to host the 2003 edition, but the outbreak of SARS in that country forced that event to be moved to the United States. FIFA immediately granted the 2007 event to China, which meant that no new host nation was chosen competitively until the voting was held for the 2011 Women's World Cup.

Contents

The tournament opened with a record-breaking match in Shanghai, as Germany beat Argentina 11–0 to register the biggest win and the highest scoring match in Women's World Cup history, records which stood until 2019. The tournament ended with Germany defeating Brazil 2–0 in the final, having never surrendered a goal in the entire tournament. The Germans became the first national team in FIFA Women's World Cup history to retain their title.

The golden goal rule for extra time in knockout matches was eliminated by FIFA, although no matches went to extra time nor required a penalty shootout.

Teams

Africa (CAF)
Asia (AFC)
North America, Central America & Caribbean (CONCACAF)
Europe (UEFA)
Oceania (OFC)
South America (CONMEBOL)

Venues

The venues selected to host the competition were: [2]

Tianjin
2007 FIFA Women's World Cup (China)
Tianjin Olympic Centre Stadium
Capacity: 60,000
Tianjin Olympic Center Stadium.jpg
Wuhan
Wuhan Stadium
Capacity: 55,000
Wuhan Sport Centre 01.jpg
Hangzhou Chengdu Shanghai
Yellow Dragon Sports Center Chengdu Sports Centre Hongkou Stadium
Capacity: 51,000Capacity: 40,000Capacity: 33,000
Hangzhou-yellow-dragon-stad.jpg Chengdu Sports Center.JPG Hongkou Stadium in Shanghai.jpg

Squads

Referees

Draw

The group draw took place on 22 April 2007 at the Guanggu Science and Technology Exhibition Centre in Wuhan after the completion of the qualifying rounds. [3]

FIFA automatically seeded the host and defending champions, slotting China and Germany into Group D and Group A, respectively. [4] The FIFA Women's World Ranking for March 2007 was used to determine the teams to occupy the other seeded positions, B1 and C1. [5] United States were ranked first, Germany second and Norway third, [6] so the United States and Norway were also seeded.

Also, no two teams from the same confederation could draw each other, except for those from UEFA, where a maximum of two teams from UEFA could be drawn into the same group. Group B quickly became dubbed the group of death [7] since three of the top five teams in the world were drawn in this group – the USA (1st), Sweden (3rd) and North Korea (5th), according to the June 2007 FIFA Women's World Rankings, the last to be released before the tournament. The same four teams were drawn together in Group A in the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, [7] on that occasion the US and Sweden progressed to the knockout stages.

Group stage

Participating countries and their results FIFA Womens World Cup 2007.png
Participating countries and their results

All times are local (UTC+8).

Tiebreakers

Teams are ranked on the following criteria: [8]

  1. Greater number of points in all group matches
  2. Goal difference in all group matches
  3. Greater number of goals scored in all group matches
  4. Greatest number of points in matches between teams
  5. Goal difference in matches between teams
  6. Greatest number of goals scored in matches between teams
  7. Fair play criteria based on red and yellow cards received
  8. Drawing of lots by the FIFA Organising Committee

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3210130+137Advance to knockout stage
2Flag of England.svg  England 312083+55
3Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 31113414
4Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 3003118170
Source: FIFA
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 11–0 Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina
Report
Japan  Flag of Japan.svg 2–2 Flag of England.svg  England
Report

Argentina  Flag of Argentina.svg 0–1 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Report
England  Flag of England.svg 0–0 Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Report

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 2–0 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Report
Yellow Dragon Stadium, Hangzhou
Attendance: 39,817 [9]
Referee: Adriana Correa (Colombia)
England  Flag of England.svg 6–1 Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina
Report

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States 321052+37Advance to knockout stage
2Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 311154+14
3Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 31113414
4Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 30121431
Source: FIFA

The four teams were also paired in the same group in 2003.

United States  Flag of the United States.svg 2–2 Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea
Report
Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg 1–1 Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Report

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg 0–2 Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report
North Korea  Flag of North Korea.svg 2–0 Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Report

Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg 0–1 Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report
Hongkou Football Stadium, Shanghai
Attendance: 6,100 [9]
Referee: Mayumi Oiwa (Japan)
North Korea  Flag of North Korea.svg 1–2 Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Report

Group C

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3210104+67Advance to knockout stage
2Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 312074+35
3Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 311174+34
4Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 3003315120
Source: FIFA
Ghana  Flag of Ghana.svg 1–4 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Report
Yellow Dragon Stadium, Hangzhou
Attendance: 30,752 [9]
Referee: Adriana Correa (Colombia)
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 2–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Report
Yellow Dragon Stadium, Hangzhou
Attendance: 30,752 [9]
Referee: Christine Beck (Germany)

Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 4–0 Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana
Report
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg 1–1 Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Report
Yellow Dragon Stadium, Hangzhou
Attendance: 33,835 [9]
Referee: Niu Huijun (China PR)

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 7–2 Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana
Report
Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2–2 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Report

Group D

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 3300100+109Advance to knockout stage
2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR (H)32015616
3Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 31024403
4Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 30030990
Source: FIFA
(H) Host.
New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg 0–5 Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Report
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 3–2 Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Report

Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg 2–0 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
Report
Wuhan Sports Centre Stadium, Wuhan
Attendance: 54,000 [9]
Referee: Mayumi Oiwa (Japan)
Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg 4–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Report

China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2–0 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
Report
Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg 1–0 Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Report

Knockout stage

Bracket

 
Quarter-finals Semi-finals Final
 
          
 
22 September – Wuhan
 
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3
 
26 September – Tianjin
 
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 0
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3
 
23 September – Wuhan
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 0
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1
 
30 September – Shanghai
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 0
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 2
 
22 September – Tianjin
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3
 
27 September – Hangzhou
 
Flag of England.svg  England 0
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0
 
23 September – Tianjin
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 4 Third place play-off
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 3
 
30 September – Shanghai
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 2
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1
 
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 4
 

Quarter-finals

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 3–0 Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea
Report

United States  Flag of the United States.svg 3–0 Flag of England.svg  England
Report

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 1–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Report

Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg 3–2 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Report

Semi-finals

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 3–0 Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Report

United States  Flag of the United States.svg 0–4 Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Report

Third place play-off

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 1–4 Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report

Final

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 2–0 Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Report

Statistics

Goalscorers

There were 111 goals scored in 32 matches, for an average of 3.47 goals per match. Marta of Brazil won the Golden Shoe award for scoring seven goals.

7 goals

6 goals

5 goals

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

Assists

3 assists

2 assists

1 assist

Source: FIFA Technical Report

Awards

The following awards were given at the conclusion of the tournament. [14] [15] [16] FIFA.com shortlisted ten goals for users to vote on as the Goal of the Tournament. [17] The Most Entertaining Team award was also decided by a poll on FIFA.com. [18] [19] [20]

Golden BallSilver BallBronze Ball
Flag of Brazil.svg Marta Flag of Germany.svg Birgit Prinz Flag of Brazil.svg Cristiane
Golden ShoeSilver ShoeBronze Shoe
Flag of Brazil.svg Marta Flag of the United States.svg Abby Wambach Flag of Norway.svg Ragnhild Gulbrandsen
7 goals, 5 assists6 goals, 1 assist6 goals, 0 assists
Best Goalkeeper
Flag of Germany.svg Nadine Angerer
Goal of the Tournament
Flag of Brazil.svg Marta
Soccerball shade.svg 79' for 4–0 in Semi-finals vs United States (27 September)
FIFA Fair Play Award
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Most Entertaining Team
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil

All-Star Team

GoalkeepersDefendersMidfieldersForwards

Flag of Germany.svg Nadine Angerer
Flag of Norway.svg Bente Nordby

Flag of Germany.svg Ariane Hingst
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Li Jie
Flag of Norway.svg Ane Stangeland Horpestad
Flag of Germany.svg Kerstin Stegemann

Flag of Brazil.svg Daniela
Flag of Brazil.svg Formiga
Flag of England.svg Kelly Smith
Flag of Germany.svg Renate Lingor
Flag of Norway.svg Ingvild Stensland
Flag of the United States.svg Kristine Lilly

Flag of Australia (converted).svg Lisa De Vanna
Flag of Brazil.svg Marta
Flag of Brazil.svg Cristiane
Flag of Germany.svg Birgit Prinz

Tournament ranking

Per statistical convention in football, matches decided in extra time are counted as wins and losses, while matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws.

PosGrpTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsFinal result
1 A Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 6510210+2116Champions
2 D Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 6501174+1315Runners-up
3 B Flag of the United States.svg  United States 6411127+513Third place
4 C Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 63121211+110Fourth place
5 D Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR (H)42025726Eliminated in
quarter-finals
6 C Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 412197+25
7 A Flag of England.svg  England 412186+25
8 B Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 41125724
9 C Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 311174+34Eliminated in
group stage
10 A Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 31113414
10 B Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 31113414
12 D Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 31024403
13 B Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 30121431
14 D Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 30030990
15 C Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 3003315120
16 A Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 3003118170
Source: FIFA Technical Report [21]
(H) Host.

Coverage

Numerous TV stations around the world provided coverage of the tournament. One notable example is the Chinese-language channel CCTV-5, which also broadcast over the internet via TVUnetworks.

Monetary rewards

For the first time in FIFA Women's World Cup history, all teams received monetary bonuses according to the round they reached (all in USD): [22]

Other rewards

UEFA used the FIFA Women's World Cup as its qualifying tournament for the 2008 Olympic women's tournament. The best three performing UEFA teams will qualify for the Olympics. Originally it was thought that, should England make the top three European teams, they would compete under the United Kingdom banner. However, on 6 September 2007, FIFA issued a press release indicating that England are ineligible to participate in the 2008 Olympics as England does not have its own Olympic Committee. [23] For the determination of the ranking only first through fourth place, quarterfinal elimination or group phase elimination count. If there is a need to make a distinction between teams eliminated in the quarterfinal or between teams eliminated in the group phase these teams will meet in a play-off match. In no case will the points or goals (difference) count for teams eliminated before the semi-final.

Germany and Norway qualified for the Olympics at the World Cup, whereas Denmark and Sweden had to enter a play-off for the third Olympics spot. Sweden won both legs of the playoffs with a total of 7–3 on aggregate to qualify for the Olympics.

Controversies

Kenneth Heiner-Møller and Danish players accused the Chinese hosts of harassment and covert surveillance prior to China's first round match against Denmark. China's Swedish coach Marika Domanski-Lyfors and her assistant Pia Sundhage were unaware of the incidents and Heiner-Møller absolved them of any blame, although he refused to shake hands after the match. [24]

Notes

  1. 1 2 The Germany v Japan and England v Argentina matches, originally scheduled on 18 September 2007, 17:00 CST, [10] were moved to a day earlier to due to commemorations for the Mukden Incident. [11]
  2. 1 2 3 The Norway v Ghana match, originally scheduled on 19 September 2007, 17:00 CST, at Hongkou Football Stadium, Shanghai, was postponed by FIFA on 18 September to the following day and moved to Yellow Dragon Stadium, Hangzhou, due to Typhoon Wipha. [12] On 19 September, FIFA also delayed the Australia v Canada match, originally scheduled on 19 September 2007, 17:00 CST, to the following day to allow for simultaneous kick-off times on the final matchday of the group after it was confirmed that weather conditions would not affect the rescheduling. [13]
  3. 1 2 The Brazil v Denmark match, originally scheduled on 19 September 2007, 20:00 CST, was postponed by FIFA on 18 September to the following day due to Typhoon Wipha. [12] On 19 September, FIFA also delayed the China PR v New Zealand match, originally scheduled on 19 September 2007, 20:00 CST, to allow for simultaneous kick-off times on the final matchday of the group after it was confirmed that weather conditions would not affect the rescheduling. [13]

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