2013 Boston Marathon

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2013 Boston Marathon
Lelisa Desisa Benti boston marathon 2013.jpg Rita jeptoo 2013 boston marathon.jpg
Lelisa Desisa Benti, male winner and Rita Jeptoo, female winner of the 2013 Boston Marathon, near the race's half-way point at the Wellesley College "Scream Tunnel".
Venue Boston, Massachusetts
DatesApril 15
  2012
2014  

The 2013 Boston Marathon took place in Boston, Massachusetts on Monday April 15, 2013. It was the 117th edition of the mass-participation Boston Marathon. Organized by the Boston Athletic Association, it was the second of the World Marathon Majors series to be held in 2013. Over 23,000 runners participated. Lelisa Desisa won the men's division with a time of 2:10:22. Rita Jeptoo won the women's division with a time of 2:26:25. More than $800,000 of prize money was awarded. [1]

Boston Marathon marathon running race held in Boston, Untied States

The Boston Marathon is an annual marathon hosted by several cities in greater Boston in eastern Massachusetts, United States. It is always held on Patriots' Day, the third Monday of April. Begun in 1897, the event was inspired by the success of the first marathon competition in the 1896 Summer Olympics. The Boston Marathon is the world's oldest annual marathon and ranks as one of the world's best-known road racing events. It is one of six World Marathon Majors. Its course runs from Hopkinton in southern Middlesex County to Copley Square in Boston.

The Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) is a non-profit, running-focused, organized sports association for the Greater Boston area. The B.A.A. hosts such events as the Boston Marathon, the B.A.A. 5K, the B.A.A. 10K, the B.A.A. Half Marathon, the B.A.A. Distance Medley, and the B.A.A. Invitational Mile.

The Abbott World Marathon Majors (AWMM) is a championship-style competition for marathon runners that started in 2006. It comprises six annual races for the cities of Tokyo, Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago and New York City, a biennial race, the IAAF World Championships Marathon, and a quadrennial race, the Olympic Games Marathon.

Contents

The event was disrupted by a terrorist attack in which two consecutive explosions on the sidewalk near the finish line killed three spectators and injured 264 other people. [2] The race was halted, preventing many participants from finishing. The attack received widespread international media attention.

Boston Marathon bombing Deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt

During the annual Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013, two homemade pressure cooker bombs detonated 12 seconds and 210 yards (190 m) apart at 2:49 p.m., near the finish line of the race, killing three people and injuring several hundred others, including 16 who lost limbs.

Race description

Course map Boston Marathon route.png
Course map

After 26 seconds of silence to honor the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, the marathon got underway with 52 wheelchair competitors leaving Hopkinton at 9:17 am EDT. At 9:30 am, 51 elite women left the starting line, followed by the elite men at 10 am. The remaining competitors were released in three waves over the next 40 minutes. [3] In total, 23,336 competitors, from all 50 states plus Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico, and from 92 countries, started the marathon. [4] The temperature at start time was in the upper 40s °F (810 °C) range and climbed to 54 °F (12 °C) at the finish. [3]

Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut

The Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting occurred on December 14, 2012, in Newtown, Connecticut, United States, when 20-year-old Adam Lanza fatally shot 20 children between six and seven years old, and six adult staff members. Before driving to the school, he shot and killed his mother at their Newtown home. As first responders arrived at the school, Lanza committed suicide by shooting himself in the head.

Twenty-three-year-old Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia beat out two other runners in a three-way sprint to finish first in the men's division. [3] It was his first win at Boston and just his second ever marathon. [1] [3] Desisa took home $150,000 and an olive wreath crown. His time of 2 hours, 10 minutes and 22 seconds was five seconds ahead of second-place finisher, Kenya's Micah Kogo. [3] Gebre Gebremariam of Ethiopia was six seconds back in third place. American Jason Hartmann finished fourth for the second straight year. [3]

Lelisa Desisa Ethiopian long distance runner

Lelisa Desisa Benti is an Ethiopian long-distance runner who specialises in road running competitions. He gained his first international medal at the 2009 African Junior Athletics Championships, where he took the 10,000 metres gold medal.

Micah Kogo Kenyan long-distance runner (b. 1968)

Micah Kemboi Kogo is a Kenyan long-distance runner, who specialises in the 10,000 metres. He is the former world record holder in the 10 kilometres road race event with a time of 27:01, and is the second fastest after countryman Leonard Komon. He made his first Olympic appearance in 2008, taking the 10,000 m bronze medal in Beijing. His 10000m best of 26.35 is 6th fastest of all time.

Jason Hartmann American marathon runner

Jason Hartmann is a NCAA coach and a former American long-distance runner who specializes in marathon races. He won the Twin Cities Marathon in 2009. He was the top American finisher at the 2010 Chicago Marathon and was fourth at the Boston Marathon in both 2012 and 2013. His personal record for the event is 2:11:06.

Halfway through the race, nine men, all from Kenya or Ethiopia, broke away from the main pack. With one mile to go, the lead group was down to three. At that point, Desisa made his move and pulled away from the other two. His lead widened as he sprinted to the finish line for the win. [3] He became the fourth Ethiopian man to win the race, and the 24th East African to win in the past 26 years. [3]

Rita Jeptoo of Kenya won the women's division with a time of 2 hours, 26 minutes and 25 seconds. It was her second win at Boston, the other coming in 2006, and her first major win since taking two years off to have a baby. [1] [3] She finished 33 seconds ahead of Ethiopia's Meseret Hailu, who took second place. [3] Defending champion Sharon Cherop of Kenya took third, 36 seconds off the lead. [3] American Shalane Flanagan finished fourth. [1]

Rita Jeptoo Kenyan marathon runner

Rita Jeptoo is a Kenyan marathon runner. Originally a winner of the Boston Marathon three times, including setting the then course record at 2:18:57 in 2014, she had also won marathons in Chicago, Stockholm, and Milan, as well as having represented Kenya in the event at the 2007 World Championships in Athletics. She was the bronze medalist at the 2006 IAAF World Road Running Championships.

Meseret Hailu Ethiopian long-distance runner

Meseret Hailu Debele is an Ethiopian long-distance runner who competes in half marathons and marathons. She was the gold medallist at the 2012 IAAF World Half Marathon Championships and won the Amsterdam Marathon that same year. Her personal bests are 2:21:09 hours for the marathon and 66:56 minutes for the half marathon.

Sharon Cherop Kenyan long-distance runner

Sharon Jemutai Cherop is a Kenyan long-distance runner who specialises in the marathon. She won a bronze medal at the age of sixteen in the 5000 metres at the World Junior Championships. She was the bronze medal winner in the marathon at the 2011 World Championships in Athletics and won the Boston Marathon in 2012.

Jeptoo is the third consecutive Kenyan winner. East Africans have won 17 of the past 19 races of the women's side. [3]

Hiroyuki Yamamoto of Japan won the men's wheelchair race, beating out nine-time champion Ernst Van Dyk of South Africa by 39 seconds. [1] American Tatyana McFadden won the women's wheelchair race. [1]

Results

Elite Men
PlaceAthleteNationalityTime
Gold medal icon.svg Lelisa Desisa Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 2:10:22
Silver medal icon.svg Micah Kogo Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 2:10:27
Bronze medal icon.svg Gebregziabher Gebremariam Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 2:10:28
4 Jason Hartmann Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2:12:12
5 Wesley Korir Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 2:12:30
6 Markos Geneti Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 2:12:44
7 Dickson Chumba Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 2:14:08
8 Jeffrey Hunt Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 2:14:28
9 Daniel Tapia Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2:14:30
10 Craig Leon Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2:14:38
Elite Women
PlaceAthleteNationalityTime
Gold medal icon.svg Rita Jeptoo Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 2:26:25
Silver medal icon.svg Meseret Hailu Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 2:26:58
Bronze medal icon.svg Sharon Cherop Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 2:27:01
4 Shalane Flanagan Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2:27:08
5 Tirfi Tsegaye Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 2:28:09
6 Kara Goucher Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2:28:11
7 Madai Perez Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 2:28:59
8 Diane Nukuri-Johnson Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi 2:29:54
9 Ana Dulce Felix Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 2:30:05
10 Sabrina Mockenhaupt Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 2:30:09

Wheelchair

Men
PlaceAthleteNationalityTime
Gold medal icon.svg Hiroyuki Yamamoto Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 1:25:33
Silver medal icon.svg Ernst F. Van Dyk Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 1:27:12
Bronze medal icon.svg Kota Hokinoue Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 1:27:13
Women
PlaceAthleteNationalityTime
Gold medal icon.svg Tatyana McFadden Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1:45:25
Silver medal icon.svg Sandra Graf Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1:46:54
Bronze medal icon.svg Amanda M. McGrory Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1:49:19

Bombing

Aftermath of the first blast 2013 Boston Marathon aftermath people.jpg
Aftermath of the first blast

At 2:50 pm EDT, race clock time 4:09.43, almost two hours after the winners had completed the race, two explosions occurred near the finish line. [5] [6] Three spectators were killed and 264 others were injured. [2] Among the injured, 17 were reported in critical condition. [7] At least 14 people required amputations. [5] The race was halted 8 minutes after the explosions; runners east of Massachusetts Avenue were diverted into Boston Common, while those west of it were diverted to Kenmore Square. [5] Over 5,000 participants who were unable to finish due to the race being halted were given medals. [8] [9]

On May 16, the Boston Athletic Association gave participants who ran at least half the distance but were not able to complete the 2013 Marathon early entry into the 2014 Marathon, which was held on April 21, 2014. The BAA agreed to allow these 5,633 runners entry in August, compared to September for regular entrants. Qualifying standards were also waived for them. [10]

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2012 Chicago Marathon

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2013 London Marathon 33rd London Marathon

The 2013 London Marathon took place on Sunday 21 April 2013. It was the 33rd running of the annual mass-participation marathon race and the third World Marathon Major of the year. 34,631 people participated.

2013 New York City Marathon

The 2013 New York City Marathon took place on Sunday, November 3, 2013, and was the 43rd edition of that race. It followed a one-year hiatus after the 2012 New York City Marathon was canceled due to Hurricane Sandy. Geoffrey Mutai of Kenya won the men's division with a time of 2:08:24, his second consecutive win in New York. Priscah Jeptoo, also from Kenya, won the women's division with a time of 2:25:07. The two winners each received $100,000 in prize money, with Jeptoo capturing the World Marathon Majors title for $500,000.

2014 London Marathon 34th London Marathon

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2014 Boston Marathon 2014 athletic marathon

The 2014 Boston Marathon took place in Boston, Massachusetts, on Monday, April 21. It was the 118th edition of the mass-participation marathon. The race is organized by the Boston Athletic Association. On account of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, extra security measures were implemented. The 2014 Marathon had about 36,000 registered participants, second only to the 1996 race in number of entries. The Boston Globe reported that over a million people were expected to line the marathon route to watch the race, twice the number who attend during a typical year.

2015 Boston Marathon

The 2015 Boston Marathon was the 119th running of the Boston Athletic Association's mass-participation marathon. It took place on Monday, April 20. The men's race was won by Lelisa Desisa from Ethiopia in a time of 2:09:17. Caroline Rotich of Kenya won the women's race with a time 2:24:55.

Lemi Berhanu Hayle, also known as Berhanu Lemi, is an Ethiopian long-distance runner who specialises in the marathon. He competed in the marathon event at the 2015 World Championships in Athletics in Beijing, China, placing 15th. His personal best of 2:04:33 hours, set in 2015, ranks him in the world's top 15 athletes for the distance. In April 2016, he won the Boston Marathon.

The 45th New York City Marathon took place on November 1, 2015. The event was organised by the New York Road Runners and sponsored by Tata Consultancy Services (TCS). A total of 50,229 runners were registered to take part in the event. The main race saw the third successive set of Kenyans taking first place. Stanley Biwott won the men's division with a time of 2:10:34. His compatriot Mary Keitany claimed the women's division with a time of 2:24:25, her second consecutive win in New York. In the wheelchair divisions, South African Ernst van Dyk won the men's division with a time of 1:30:54 and American Tatyana McFadden won the women's division with a new record of 1:43:04.

2016 Boston Marathon

The 2016 Boston Marathon was the 120th running of the Boston Athletic Association's mass-participation marathon. It took place on Monday, April 18. Both of the winners were from Ethiopia: the men's race was won by Lemi Berhanu Hayle in a time of 2:12:45. Atsede Baysa won the women's race with a time of 2:29:19.

The 48th New York City Marathon took place on November 4, 2018. The men's race was won by Ethiopian racer Lelisa Desisa. Desisa held off a late close, being chased to the finish by Shura Kitata. The women's race was won by Kenyan Mary Keitany, her fourth win. The only woman to beat Keitany during a streak of 5 marathons was 2017 winner Shalane Flanagan. Both Desisa and Keitany recorded the second fastest times on the course.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Mark Memmott (April 15, 2013). "Africans Win At Boston Marathon". NPR. Retrieved April 15, 2013.
  2. 1 2 Kotz, Deborah (April 24, 2013). "Injury toll from Marathon bombs reduced to 264" . Retrieved April 29, 2013. Boston public health officials said Tuesday that they have revised downward their estimate of the number of people injured in the Marathon attacks, to 264.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 "Lelisa Desisa, Rita Jeptoo win Boston Marathon". USA Today. Associated Press. April 15, 2013. Retrieved April 15, 2013.
  4. "2013 Boston Marathon Statistics". Archived from the original on April 23, 2013. Retrieved April 22, 2013.
  5. 1 2 3 "Explosions rock Boston Marathon, several injured". CNN. April 15, 2013. Retrieved April 15, 2013.
  6. Golen, Jimmy (April 15, 2013). "Two explosions at Boston marathon finish line". AP Newswire. Archived from the original on April 15, 2013. Retrieved April 15, 2013.
  7. "Deaths, injuries reported after Boston Marathon blasts". USA Today. April 15, 2013. Retrieved April 15, 2013.
  8. "Boston Marathon runners receive medals after bombings stop them from finishing" . Retrieved April 17, 2013.
  9. "Boston Marathon Runners Sidelined by Bombings Feel 'Angry,' 'Disappointed'" . Retrieved April 21, 2013.
  10. Boston Marathon invites stopped runners back