660 BC

Last updated
Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
660 BC in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 660 BC
DCLIX BC
Ab urbe condita 94
Ancient Egypt era XXVI dynasty, 5
- Pharaoh Psamtik I, 5
Ancient Greek era 30th Olympiad (victor
Assyrian calendar 4091
Balinese saka calendar N/A
Bengali calendar −1252
Berber calendar 291
Buddhist calendar −115
Burmese calendar −1297
Byzantine calendar 4849–4850
Chinese calendar 庚申(Metal  Monkey)
2037 or 1977
     to 
辛酉年 (Metal  Rooster)
2038 or 1978
Coptic calendar −943 – −942
Discordian calendar 507
Ethiopian calendar −667 – −666
Hebrew calendar 3101–3102
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat −603 – −602
 - Shaka Samvat N/A
 - Kali Yuga 2441–2442
Holocene calendar 9341
Iranian calendar 1281 BP – 1280 BP
Islamic calendar 1320 BH – 1319 BH
Javanese calendar N/A
Julian calendar N/A
Korean calendar 1674
Minguo calendar 2571 before ROC
民前2571年
Nanakshahi calendar −2127
Thai solar calendar −117 – −116
Tibetan calendar 阳金猴年
(male Iron-Monkey)
−533 or −914 or −1686
     to 
阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
−532 or −913 or −1685

The year 660 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. In the Roman Empire, it was known as year 94 Ab urbe condita . The denomination 660 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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References

  1. Ian Sample (March 11, 2019). "Radioactive particles from huge solar storm found in Greenland". The Guardian . Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  2. Paschal O'Hare (2019). "Multiradionuclide evidence for an extreme solar proton event around 2,610 B.P. (∼660 BC)". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 116 (13): 5961–5966. Bibcode:2019PNAS..116.5961O. doi:10.1073/pnas.1815725116. PMC   6442557 . PMID   30858311.