Athletics at the 2002 Commonwealth Games – Women's 400 metres hurdles

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The women's 400 metres hurdles event at the 2002 Commonwealth Games was held on 27–28 July.

Contents

Medalists

GoldSilverBronze
Jana Pittman
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Debbie-Ann Parris
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Karlene Haughton
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada

Results

Heats

Qualification: First 3 of each heat (Q) and the next 2 fastest (q) qualified for the final.

RankHeatNameNationalityTimeNotes
11 Jana Pittman Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 54.14Q, PB
21 Debbie-Ann Parris Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 55.23Q
32 Deon Hemmings Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 55.78Q
41 Natasha Danvers Flag of England.svg  England 56.12Q
52 Sonia Brito Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 56.29Q
62 Karlene Haughton Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 56.45Q
71 Melaine Walker Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 56.98q
82 Sinead Dudgeon Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 57.11q
92 Tracey Duncan Flag of England.svg  England 57.45
102 Andrea Blackett Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 57.48
111 Katie Jones Flag of England.svg  England 57.69PB
121 Carole Kaboud Mebam Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 59.30

Final

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Jana Pittman Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 54.40
Silver medal icon.svg Debbie-Ann Parris Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 55.24
Bronze medal icon.svg Karlene Haughton Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 56.13
4 Melaine Walker Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 57.10
5 Sonia Brito Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 57.79
6 Sinead Dudgeon Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 58.68
7 Natasha Danvers Flag of England.svg  England 1:27.12
Deon Hemmings Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica DNS

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