Bryant, Arkansas

Last updated
Bryant, Arkansas
Motto(s): 
Geographical center of ARKANSAS"
Saline County Arkansas Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Bryant Highlighted 0509460.svg
Location of Bryant in Saline County, Arkansas.
Coordinates: 34°36′49″N92°29′29″W / 34.61361°N 92.49139°W / 34.61361; -92.49139 Coordinates: 34°36′49″N92°29′29″W / 34.61361°N 92.49139°W / 34.61361; -92.49139
Country United States
State Arkansas
County Saline
Area
[1]
  Total20.46 sq mi (52.99 km2)
  Land20.37 sq mi (52.77 km2)
  Water0.09 sq mi (0.23 km2)
Elevation
413 ft (126 m)
Population
  Total16,688
  Estimate 
(2017) [2]
20,194
  Density991.21/sq mi (382.70/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP codes
72022, 72089
Area code(s) 501
FIPS code 05-09460
GNIS feature ID0057459
Website cityofbryant.com

Bryant is a city in Saline County, Arkansas, United States and a suburb of Little Rock. According to the 2010 Census, the population of the city was 16,688. [3] It is part of the Little Rock North Little Rock Conway Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Saline County, Arkansas County in the United States

Saline County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 107,118. at the 2010 census. Its county seat and largest city is Benton. Saline County was formed on November 2, 1835, and named for the salt water (brine) springs in the area, however, it is pronounced "suh-LEAN" instead of the typical pronunciation, "SAY-lean". Until November 2014, it was an alcohol prohibition or dry county.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Little Rock, Arkansas Capital of Arkansas

Little Rock is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Arkansas. As the county seat of Pulaski County, the city was incorporated on November 7, 1831, on the south bank of the Arkansas River close to the state's geographic center. The city derives its name from a rock formation along the river, named the "Little Rock" by the French explorer Jean-Baptiste Bénard de la Harpe in the 1720s. The capital of the Arkansas Territory was moved to Little Rock from Arkansas Post in 1821. The city's population was 198,541 in 2016 according to the United States Census Bureau. The six-county Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway, AR Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is ranked 78th in terms of population in the United States with 738,344 residents according to the 2017 estimate by the United States Census Bureau.

Contents

History

European settlers established themselves along Hurricane Creek in the early 19th century. A skirmish in the area occurred during the American Civil War. [4] Rail service in the 1870s brought development. [5] The town was hard hit by economic struggles in the early 20th century and through the Great Depression. World War II era saw development as demand for the area's bauxite grew. [4]

Great Depression 20th-century worldwide economic depression

The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how intensely the world's economy can decline.

Bauxite aluminium ore

Bauxite is a sedimentary rock with a relatively high aluminium content. It is the world's main source of aluminium. Bauxite consists mostly of the aluminium minerals gibbsite (Al(OH)3), boehmite (γ-AlO(OH)) and diaspore (α-AlO(OH)), mixed with the two iron oxides goethite and haematite, the aluminium clay mineral kaolinite and small amounts of anatase (TiO2) and ilmenite (FeTiO3 or FeO.TiO2).

Geography

Bryant is located at 34°36′49″N92°29′29″W / 34.61361°N 92.49139°W / 34.61361; -92.49139 (34.613518, -92.491464). [6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 9.1 square miles (24 km2), of which 9.1 square miles (24 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) (0.33%) is water.

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1900 113
1910 91−19.5%
1920 13245.1%
1930 16222.7%
1940 1736.8%
1950 387123.7%
1960 73790.4%
1970 1,19962.7%
1980 2,682123.7%
1990 5,26996.5%
2000 9,76485.3%
2010 16,68870.9%
Est. 201720,194 [2] 21.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
2015 Estimate [8]

As of the census [9] of 2000, there were 9,764 people, 3,601 households, and 2,823 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,076.4 people per square mile (415.6/km²). There were 3,762 housing units at an average density of 414.7 per square mile (160.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.2% White, 1.5% Black or African American, 0.34% Native American, 1.05% Asian, 0.37% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. 1.05% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practice.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

There were 3,601 households out of which 42.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.9% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.6% were non-families. 19.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.03.

Marriage Social union or legal contract between people called spouses that creates kinship

Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a socially or ritually recognised union between spouses that establishes rights and obligations between those spouses, as well as between them and any resulting biological or adopted children and affinity. The definition of marriage varies around the world not only between cultures and between religions, but also throughout the history of any given culture and religion, evolving to both expand and constrict in who and what is encompassed, but typically it is principally an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually sexual, are acknowledged or sanctioned. In some cultures, marriage is recommended or considered to be compulsory before pursuing any sexual activity. When defined broadly, marriage is considered a cultural universal. A marriage ceremony is known as a wedding.

In the city, the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 32.7% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $48,870, and the median income for a family was $56,038. Males had a median income of $39,380 versus $26,261 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,730. About 3.5% of families and 4.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.1% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.

Water supply

Bryant purchases treated surface water from Lake Maumelle and Lake Winona from Central Arkansas Water.

Government and infrastructure

The Arkansas Department of Human Services Arkansas Juvenile Assessment & Treatment Center (AJATC) is located in Bryant. [10] [11]

The U.S. Postal Service operates the Bryant Post Office. [12]

Education

Public education for elementary and secondary school students may attend Bryant School District with students graduating from Bryant High School.

In the early 1970s, political aide Carol Rasco set up the public school system's psychological counseling services while she worked in the district. [13]

Notable people

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References

  1. "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Aug 22, 2018.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  3. "Annual Estimates of the Population for All Incorporated Places in Arkansas". 2005 Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. June 21, 2006. Archived from the original (CSV) on 2006-10-15. Retrieved November 16, 2006.
  4. 1 2 http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=980
  5. Company, Goodspeed Publishing (16 April 1889). "Biographical and Historical Memoirs: Pulaski, Jefferson, Lonoke, Faulkner, Grant, Saline, Perry, Garland, and Hot Spring Counties, Arkansas". Southern Historical Press via Google Books.
  6. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  7. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  8. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Archived from the original on 2016-10-19. Retrieved June 2, 2016.
  9. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  10. "Community-based program directory." Arkansas Department of Human Services. Retrieved on August 30, 2010. "Arkansas Juvenile Assessment and Treatment Center 1501 Woody Drive Alexander, AR 72002"
  11. "Bryant city, Arkansas." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on August 30, 2010.
  12. "Post Office™ Location - BRYANT Archived March 5, 2011, at the Wayback Machine ." U.S. Postal Service. Retrieved on March 1, 2011.
  13. Radcliffe, Donnie (1993-08-24). "CLINTON'S WINDOW ON THE HOME FRONT". Washington Post. ISSN   0190-8286 . Retrieved 2018-07-28.