Calendar of saints (Church of the Province of Melanesia)

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The calendar of saints and commemorations in the Church of the Province of Melanesia (the Anglican Church in the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu) is a continually developing list. Both old and new, universal and local saints and worthies are celebrated.

Calendar of saints Christian liturgical calendar celebrating saints

The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".

Solomon Islands Country in Oceania

Solomon Islands is a sovereign state consisting of six major islands and over 900 smaller islands in Oceania lying to the east of Papua New Guinea and northwest of Vanuatu and covering a land area of 28,400 square kilometres (11,000 sq mi). The country's capital, Honiara, is located on the island of Guadalcanal. The country takes its name from the Solomon Islands archipelago, which is a collection of Melanesian islands that also includes the North Solomon Islands, but excludes outlying islands, such as Rennell and Bellona, and the Santa Cruz Islands.

Vanuatu Country in Oceania

Vanuatu, officially the Republic of Vanuatu, is a Pacific island country located in the South Pacific Ocean. The archipelago, which is of volcanic origin, is 1,750 kilometres (1,090 mi) east of northern Australia, 540 kilometres (340 mi) northeast of New Caledonia, east of New Guinea, southeast of the Solomon Islands, and west of Fiji.

Contents

Classification of saint's days and commemorations

There are three main classes of saint's day within the calendar. This classification is based on the reformed scheme of holy day classification used by the Roman Catholic Church from 1965 to 1970.

Class I

Class I days are all the Major Holy Days of the Church. All the festivals of our Lord and a few others are Class I. There is always a First Evensong and Second Evensong. Morning Prayer, the Holy Eucharist and the both Evensongs all have proper psalms and lessons appropriate to the day. The Holy Eucharist is sung, and the Creed and Gloria are used. These Major Holy Days are never transferred unless they fall during Holy Week or Easter Week. Baptism, Confirmation, and Ordination are appropriate for these days, but not funerals or weddings. though these frequently occur.

Sundays are all Class I Holy Days because they are festivals of our Lord on which we give thanks for the Resurrection of Christ. Therefore, every Saturday evening there is a First Evensong for the Sunday. On Saturday evenings, only the Collect for the next day should be used.

Class II

Class II days are all feasts of the apostles and Four Evangelists and some others. Sometimes there is a First Evensong. There are propers for the day, i.e. appropriate collects, psalms, lessons. The Second Order provides other propers, such as prefaces and blessings, sentences, etc. The Eucharist should be sung and the Creed and the Gloria are used. These also are appropriate for Baptism, Confirmation and Ordination. Weddings and funerals may be held on these days as well.

Four Evangelists authors of the four canonical gospels of the New Testament (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John)

In Christian tradition, the Four Evangelists are Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, the authors attributed with the creation of the four Gospel accounts in the New Testament that bear the following titles: Gospel according to Matthew; Gospel according to Mark; Gospel according to Luke and Gospel according to John.

Class III

Class III days are the days for other saints and special days. There are usually no proper psalms and lessons at the Offices or the Eucharist, but a proper collect for the Holy Day may be used (but not in Advent or Lent). The Eucharist is not usually sung. The Gloria may be used (except in Advent and Lent), but not the Creed.

Local commemorations are observed exactly as for Class III.

Days of special observance

These are days appointed by church, civil or local authority. They may be recurring or only happen once. Recurring days of special observance include:

Litany, in Christian worship and some forms of Judaic worship, is a form of prayer used in services and processions, and consisting of a number of petitions. The word comes through Latin litania from Ancient Greek λιτανεία (litaneía), which in turn comes from λιτή (litê), meaning "supplication".

There are days celebrated by organisations within the church such as the Mothers' Union, the MBH and Companions, the SSF and TSSF, the CSC and Associates, and CSM and Associates, Girls Friendly Society, Melanesian Guild of Servers, Catechist and Lay Preachers Associations, Men's Fellowships, Youth Groups and Sunday Schools, etc. These are to be coordinated with the rector and may be celebrated on free days or Class III days. They may be celebrated on Class II days (or as Class II days) if they are significant to the organisation and do not contravene the tables of precedence above, or overshadow the saint or event celebrated on that day.

Calendar of saint's days and holy days

These dates apply unless transferred according to the Rules of Precedence.

January

Saint Timothy Early Christian evangelist and bishop from Roman Anatolia

Timothy was an early Christian evangelist and the first Christian bishop of Ephesus, who tradition relates died around the year AD 97.

Saint Titus Greek saint

Titus was an early Christian missionary and church leader, a companion and disciple of Paul the Apostle, mentioned in several of the Pauline epistles including the Epistle to Titus. He is believed to be a Gentile converted to Christianity by Paul and, according to tradition, he was consecrated as Bishop of the Island of Crete.


A bishop is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight.

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

III

Moveable feasts and days

The date of Easter governs the cycle of feasts dependent upon this, the most important feast. The number of Sundays after Epiphany and the number of Sundays after Pentecost depend on the date of Easter.

See also

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