Capped Bust

Last updated
Denominational set of the Capped Bust
1831-5C (clashed reverse die).jpg
1831 five-cent
1834 10C PR (large 4).jpg
1834 10-cent
1822 25C PR (over 50C).jpg
1822 25-cent
1822 50C PR.jpg
1822 50-cent

The Capped Bust coinage of the United States consisted of a half dime, dime, quarter and half dollar. [1]

History

John Reich designed this capped-head concept of Liberty, and it was modified by Chief Engraver of the Mint, William Kneass. It proved to be a popular design and lasted from 1807 to 1839 on the half dollar, 1815 to 1838 on the quarter, 1809 to 1837 on the dime, and 1829 to 1837 on the half dime. [2] All four of these coin were struck in 89.2% silver and 10.8% copper. [3] [4] [5] [6]

There was also a gold design created by engraver Robert Scot created in 1795, also called the Capped Bust, although it is more popularly known as the "Turban Head" because of its unusual, exotic appearance. The Turban design was used on the gold Quarter Eagle, Half Eagle, and Eagle from 1795 to 1834. [7] On the Quarter and Half Eagles, the Turban design was replaced with the regular Capped Bust design in 1808 and 1807, respectively, [8] while the Eagle, having been out of production since 1804, adopted the "Coronet" Liberty Head design in 1838. [9]

The obverse of the 2008 Andrew Jackson's Liberty First Spouse coin and medal features the Capped Bust design. [10]

Related Research Articles

United States Mint Produces circulating coinage for the United States

The United States Mint is a bureau of the Department of the Treasury responsible for producing coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce, as well as controlling the movement of bullion. It does not produce paper money; that responsibility belongs to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The first United States Mint was created in Philadelphia in 1792, and soon joined by other centers, whose coins were identified by their own mint marks. There are currently four active coin-producing mints: Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco, and West Point.

Dime (United States coin) Current denomination of United States currency

The dime, in United States usage, is a ten-cent coin, one tenth of a United States dollar, labeled formally as "one dime". The denomination was first authorized by the Coinage Act of 1792. The dime is the smallest in diameter and is the thinnest of all U.S. coins currently minted for circulation, being 0.705 inches in diameter and 0.053 in (1.35 mm) in thickness. The obverse of the current dime depicts the profile of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the reverse boasts an olive branch, a torch, and an oak branch, from left to right respectively. As of 2011, the dime coin cost 5.65 cents to produce.

Half dime Former United States five-cent silver coin

The half dime, or half disme, was a silver coin, valued at five cents, formerly minted in the United States.

United States cent mintage figures

Below are the mintage figures for the United States cent.

Stella (United States coin) Four-dollar coin minted 1879–1880

The United States four dollar coin, also officially called a Stella, is a unit of currency equivalent to four United States dollars.

Pattern coin Sample coin to demonstrate the design of a coin

A pattern coin is a coin which has not been approved for release, but produced to evaluate a proposed coin design. They are often off-metal strike, to proof standard or piedforts. Many coin collectors collect and study pattern coins because of their historical importance. Many of the world's most valuable coins are pattern coins; nearly 25 of the pieces listed in 100 Greatest US Coins are pattern coins.

The Seated Liberty portrait designs appeared on most regular-issue silver United States coinage from 1836 through 1891. The denominations which featured the Goddess of Liberty in a Seated Liberty design included the half dime, the dime, the quarter, the half dollar, and until 1873 the silver dollar. Another coin that appeared exclusively in the Seated Liberty design was the twenty cent piece. This coin was produced from 1875 to 1878, and was discontinued because it looked very similar to the quarter. Seated Liberty coinage was minted at the main United States Mint in Philadelphia, as well as the branch mints in New Orleans, San Francisco, and Carson City.

Large cent One-cent coin in the United States from 1793 to 1957

The United States large cent was a coin with a face value of 1/100 of a United States dollar. Its nominal diameter was 118 inch (28.57 mm). The first official mintage of the large cent was in 1793, and its production continued until 1857, when it was officially replaced by the modern-size one-cent coin.

<i>A Guide Book of United States Coins</i>

A Guide Book of United States Coins , first compiled by R. S. Yeoman in 1946, is a price guide for coin collectors of coins of the United States dollar, commonly known as the Red Book.

Half eagle

The half eagle is a United States coin that was produced for circulation from 1795 to 1929 and in commemorative and bullion coins since the 1980s. Composed almost entirely of gold, it has a face value of five dollars. Its production was authorized by The Act of April 2, 1792, and it was the first gold coin minted by the United States.

Draped Bust Former design used on United States coinage

"Draped Bust" was the name given to a design of United States coins. It appeared on much of the regular-issue copper and silver United States coinage, 1796–1807. It was designed by engraver Robert Scot.

Washington quarter US 25-cent coin minted since 1932

The Washington quarter is the present quarter dollar or 25-cent piece issued by the United States Mint. The coin was first struck in 1932; the original version was designed by sculptor John Flanagan.

Coronet large cent One-cent coin issued by the United States Mint from 1816 to 1857

The Coronet large cent was a type of large cent issued by the United States Mint at the Philadelphia Mint from 1816 until 1839.

The Sheldon Coin Grading Scale is a 70-point coin grading scale used in the numismatic assessment of a coin's quality. The American Numismatic Association based its Official ANA Grading Standards in large part on the Sheldon scale. The scale was created by William Herbert Sheldon.

Turban Head eagle US ten-dollar gold piece (1795–1804)

The Turban Head eagle, also known as the Capped Bust eagle, was a ten-dollar gold piece, or eagle, struck by the United States Mint from 1795 to 1804. The piece was designed by Robert Scot, and was the first in the eagle series, which continued until the Mint ceased striking gold coins for circulation in 1933. The common name is a misnomer; Liberty does not wear a turban but a cap, believed by some to be a pileus or Phrygian cap : her hair twisting around the headgear makes it resemble a turban.

Flowing Hair coinage was issued in the United States between 1793 and 1795. The design was used for the first half dime, half dollar, dollar, and the first two large cents.

United States Sesquicentennial coinage 1926 commemorative US half dollar and quarter eagle

The United States Sesquicentennial coin issue consisted of a commemorative half dollar and quarter eagle struck in 1926 at the Philadelphia Mint for the 150th anniversary of American independence. The obverse of the half dollar features portraits of the first president, George Washington, and the president in 1926, Calvin Coolidge, making it the only American coin to depict a president in his lifetime.

1804 dollar Coin worth one US$

The 1804 dollar or Bowed Liberty Dollar was a dollar coin struck by the Mint of the United States, of which fifteen specimens are currently known to exist. Though dated 1804, none were struck in that year; all were minted in the 1830s or later. They were first created for use in special proof coin sets used as diplomatic gifts during Edmund Roberts' trips to Siam and Muscat.

Below are the mintage figures for the United States quarter.

Liberty Cap half cent First half cents produced by the United States Mint

The Liberty Cap half cent was the first half cent coin produced by the United States Mint. It was issued from 1793 until 1797.

References

  1. Yeoman, R.S.; Bressett, Kenneth; Garrett, Jeff; Bowers, Q. David (2019). A Guide Book of United States Coins (72nd ed.). Pelham, AL: Whitman Publishing. pp. 156–157, 162–164, 180–181, 212–219.
  2. A Guide Book of United States Coins 2017
  3. "1829 H10C (Regular Strike) Capped Bust Half Dime - PCGS CoinFacts". PCGS. Retrieved 2019-08-25.
  4. "1809 10C (Regular Strike) Capped Bust Dime - PCGS CoinFacts". PCGS. Retrieved 2019-08-25.
  5. "1815 25C (Regular Strike) Capped Bust Quarter - PCGS CoinFacts". PCGS. Retrieved 2019-08-25.
  6. "1807 50C Large Stars 50/20 (Regular Strike) Capped Bust Half Dollar - PCGS CoinFacts". PCGS. Retrieved 2019-08-25.
  7. "Exploring Historic US Coin Designs: Turban Head and Capped Bust". jmbullion.com. JM Bullion. Retrieved 13 July 2019.
  8. Yeoman, R.S; Bressett, Kenneth; Garrett, Jeff; Bowers, Q. David (2019). A Guide Book of United States Coins. Pelham, Alabama: Whitman Publishing. pp. 265, 275–276.
  9. Yeoman, R.S.; Bressett, Kenneth; Garrett, Jeff; Bowers, Q. David (2019). A Guide Book of United States Coins. Pelham, Alabama: Whitman Publishing. p. 288.
  10. "Andrew Jackson's Liberty First Spouse $10 Gold Coin | U.S. Mint". www.usmint.gov. Retrieved 2019-07-29.