David Jones (New Zealand politician)

Last updated

David Jones
David Jones (Ellesmere Guardian, 1925).gif
David Jones in 1925
13th Minister of Agriculture
In office
22 September 1931 8 January 1932
Prime Minister George Forbes
Preceded by Alfred Murdoch
Succeeded by Charles MacMillan
Minister of Mines
In office
22 September 1931 8 January 1932
Prime Minister George Forbes
Preceded by Alfred Murdoch
Succeeded by Charles MacMillan
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for Kaiapoi
In office
17 December 1919  15 November 1922
Preceded by David Buddo
Succeeded byDavid Buddo
Majority50 (0.75%)
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for Ellesmere
In office
4 November 1925  18 October 1928
Preceded by Heaton Rhodes
Succeeded byConstituency abolished
Majority634 (8.57%)
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for Mid-Canterbury
In office
14 November 1928  12 November 1931
Preceded byNew constituency
Succeeded by Jeremiah Connolly
Majority55 (0.59%)
Personal details
Born(1873-11-09)9 November 1873
Templeton, Canterbury, New Zealand
Died23 September 1941(1941-09-23) (aged 67)
Wadestown, Wellington, New Zealand
NationalityNew Zealand
Political party Reform Party
Occupationfarmer
Cabinet Forbes

David Jones (9 November 1873 – 23 September 1941) was a Reform Party Member of Parliament in the Canterbury region of New Zealand. In September 1931, he was appointed Minister of Agriculture and Minister of Mines in the United–Reform Coalition Government, but he was unexpectedly defeated in the December 1931 general election. He was a farmer and involved with many farming organisations, and was instrumental in forming the New Zealand Farmers Union, which eventually developed into Federated Farmers. Outside parliament, he was best known for his involvement with the New Zealand Meat Producers Board, of which he was the inaugural chairman, and which he chaired for more than a decade.

Contents

Early life

Jones was born in Templeton in 1873. [1] His father was James Jones (1835–1922), [2] one of the earliest settlers in Canterbury. [3] Jones attended Templeton School. [3]

On 14 September 1899, he married Elizabeth Jane Maginness, the daughter of John Maginness. [4] [5] [6] They were to have one son and four daughters. [1]

Jones first farmed in Weedons near Rolleston. In 1909–1910, he farmed in the Waikato. [3] Next, he farmed in Dunsandel. [7] Apart from the two years in the Waikato, all his farming was in Canterbury. [3]

Public roles

Jones was one of the instigators of the New Zealand Farmers Union, which eventually developed into Federated Farmers. On three occasions, he was the president of the North Canterbury branch. He belonged to the Wheat Board and, after World War I, the Repatriation Board. [3] He was the chairman of the parliamentary committee that recommended the establishment of the New Zealand Meat Producers Board, and when it was established in 1922, he was appointed as its first chairman. [1] [8] He remained in that role until 1931 and outside his parliamentary activities, this is what he was best known for. [1] He resigned from the position when he was appointed to cabinet. Soon afterwards, he failed to get re-elected in the 1931 election, so he resumed his role as chairman of the Meat Producers Board and held it until 1935. [1] He represented the Meat Producers Board at the 1932 British Empire Economic Conference in Ottawa, Canada. His 1935 resignation came about because he was appointed as member of the Commission of Agriculture. [1]

Political career

New Zealand Parliament
YearsTermElectorateParty
1919 1922 20th Kaiapoi Reform
1925 1928 22nd Ellesmere Reform
1928 1931 23rd Mid-Canterbury Reform
Forbes Coalition Ministry in 1931, including Jones (back left) NZ Coalition Cabinet of 1931.jpg
Forbes Coalition Ministry in 1931, including Jones (back left)

He first stood for election to Parliament in the Ashburton electorate in the 1908 election. [3] Of the five candidates, he came third and since the Second Ballot Act was in force, he did not proceed to the second ballot. He was beaten by William Nosworthy and Frederick Flatman, and was only 30 votes behind Nosworthy. [9] On election night when the results were published, Jones was ahead of Nosworthy, who encouraged his supporters to vote for Jones in the second ballot. After a recount, the situation was reversed and Jones advertised for his supporters to vote for Nosworthy, and indeed, Nosworthy was successful in the second ballot. [10] [11]

The next parliamentary election that Jones contested was in 1914 in the Kaiapoi electorate. [3] David Buddo had been the incumbent for the Liberal Party since 1899, plus an earlier term starting in 1893, [12] and Jones failed to unseat him; Buddo had a majority of close to 20% of the votes. [13]

Jones contested the Kaiapoi electorate again in the 1919 election. It was a three-way contest, with Morgan Williams standing for the recently formed Labour Party as the other candidate apart from the incumbent. Jones won by a wafer-thin majority of 50 votes (0.75%). [14]

The same three candidates contested the 1922 election. This time, the situation was reversed, with Buddo having a lean majority over the incumbent, Jones, of 65 votes (0.89%). [15]

In the 1925 election, Jones stood in the Ellesmere electorate. [16] Since 1899, Ellesmere had been held by Heaton Rhodes, who also represented the Reform Party. Rhodes retired in 1925 on medical advice. [17] [18] The other candidate in Ellesmere was Jeremiah Connolly for the Liberal Party (who, in that year, contested the election under the label 'National Party'). Jones had a comfortable majority of 634 votes (8.57%). [16]

In the 1927 Electoral Redistribution, the Ellesmere electorate was abolished and most of its area went to the new Mid-Canterbury electorate. [19] This change first applied at the 1928 election, when four candidates contested the electorate: Jones for Reform, Connolly for United, Williams for Labour, and a farmer from Mount Hutt, Robert Wallace Wightman, as an Independent. Nationally, there was a significant swing towards the United Party, who had developed from the Liberal Party, at this election, and Jones once again had a very slim majority, beating Connolly by only 55 votes (0.59%). [20]

In September 1931, just prior to the next election, Jones was appointed to Cabinet by George Forbes as Minister of Agriculture and Minister of Mines. [21] The election was contested by three of the four previous candidates (Williams stood in Kaiapoi instead and was successful), [22] and Hiram Hunter joined as an Independent Labour candidate. [23] Connolly, who stood and an Independent Liberal that year, had a majority of 136 votes (1.46%) over Jones and was returned. [23] [24] There was widespread surprise and regret expressed in New Zealand over Jones having lost the election, and having lost one of the more able cabinet ministers. [25] [26] Jones did not contest the 1935 election. [27] In 1935, he was awarded the King George V Silver Jubilee Medal. [28]

Family and death

The Jones had five children: Violet Irene (born 1900), [29] Ellen Adele (born 1902), [30] Millicent Eileen (born 1904), [31] Hilda Gracey (born 1906), [32] and David Ralston (born 1908). [33] For a time, the Jones family lived in the Christchurch suburb of Bryndwr. Approximately in 1935, Jones and his wife moved to Wellington [5] where they lived at 23 Main Road (Wadestown Road) in the suburb of Wadestown. [4]

His wife died on 17 August 1937 [5] and is buried at Karori Cemetery. [34] Jones retired in January 1940 and died on 23 September 1941 in a private hospital in Wellington. [1] His pall-bearers were all fellow ex-cabinet ministers: Gordon Coates, George Forbes, Adam Hamilton, Bill Endean, Jack Massey, and Bert Kyle. [35] He was survived by his five children [4] and is buried next to his wife. [36]

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "Mr. David Jones". The Evening Post . CXXXII (73). 23 September 1941. p. 8. Retrieved 23 November 2013.
  2. "Chicory: an early Christchurch industry". Christchurch City Libraries . Retrieved 23 November 2013.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "Mr. David Jones". Auckland Star . LXXII (225). 23 September 1941. p. 6. Retrieved 23 November 2013.
  4. 1 2 3 "Deaths". The Evening Post . CXXXII (73). 23 September 1941. p. 1. Retrieved 23 November 2013.
  5. 1 2 3 "Obituary". The Evening Post . CXXIV (43). 19 August 1937. p. 18. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  6. "Marriage Search". Department of Internal Affairs . Retrieved 23 November 2013. Search for Jones and Maginners on 14/09/1899; note that her surname is misspelled on that database
  7. "Mr. David Jones". The Evening Post . XCVIII (146). 18 December 1919. p. 10. Retrieved 23 November 2013.
  8. "Meat Export Board". The Evening Post . CIII (55). 7 March 1922. p. 8. Retrieved 23 November 2013.
  9. "The General Election, 1908". National Library. 1909. p. 33. Retrieved 23 November 2013.
  10. "The Ashburton Seat". The Press . LXIV (13278). 20 November 1908. p. 6. Retrieved 23 November 2013.
  11. Wilson 1985, p. 223.
  12. Wilson 1985, p. 186.
  13. "The General Election, 1914". National Library. 1915. p. 20. Retrieved 1 August 2013.
  14. The New Zealand Official Year-Book. Government Printer. 1920. Archived from the original on 1 September 2014. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  15. "The Official Count". Auckland Star . LIII (295). 13 December 1922. p. 5. Retrieved 23 November 2013.
  16. 1 2 "Election Notices". Akaroa Mail and Banks Peninsula Advertiser. XLIX (5121). 17 November 1925. p. 3. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  17. Rice, Geoffrey W. "Rhodes, Robert Heaton". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  18. Wilson 1985, p. 230.
  19. McRobie 1989, pp. 85–89.
  20. "Mr. Jones Wins". Ellesmere Guardian. XLVI (3275). 23 November 1928. p. 5. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  21. Wilson 1985, p. 81.
  22. Wilson 1985, p. 245.
  23. 1 2 "Public Notices". Ellesmere Guardian. LII (99). 11 December 1931. p. 1. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  24. Wilson 1985, pp. 190, 208.
  25. "After the Fray". Ellesmere Guardian. LII (99). 11 December 1931. p. 5. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  26. "Cabinet Weakened". Ellesmere Guardian. LII (100). 15 December 1931. p. 8. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  27. "The General Election". The Evening Post . CXX (128). 26 November 1935. p. 20. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  28. "Official jubilee medals". Evening Post . CXIX (105). 6 May 1935. p. 4. Retrieved 11 January 2016.
  29. "Birth Search". Department of Internal Affairs . Retrieved 24 November 2013. Search for registration number 1900/13638
  30. "Birth Search". Department of Internal Affairs . Retrieved 24 November 2013. Search for registration number 1902/3493
  31. "Birth Search". Department of Internal Affairs . Retrieved 24 November 2013. Search for registration number 1904/9158
  32. "Birth Search". Department of Internal Affairs . Retrieved 24 November 2013. Search for registration number 1906/8175
  33. "Birth Search". Department of Internal Affairs . Retrieved 24 November 2013. Search for registration number 1908/3072
  34. "Details". Wellington City Council . Retrieved 24 November 2013. Section PUBLIC3; Plot number 514 C
  35. "Late Mr. D. Jones". The Evening Post . CXXXII (75). 25 September 1941. p. 10. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  36. "Details". Wellington City Council . Retrieved 24 November 2013. Section PUBLIC3; Plot number 514 C

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References

New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by
David Buddo
Member of Parliament for Kaiapoi
19191922
Succeeded by
David Buddo
Preceded by
Heaton Rhodes
Member of Parliament for Ellesmere
19251928
Constituency abolished
New constituency Member of Parliament for Mid-Canterbury
19281931
Succeeded by
Jeremiah Connolly