Fultonville, New York

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Fultonville, New York
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Fultonville, New York
Location within the state of New York
Coordinates: 42°56′48″N74°22′10″W / 42.94667°N 74.36944°W / 42.94667; -74.36944 Coordinates: 42°56′48″N74°22′10″W / 42.94667°N 74.36944°W / 42.94667; -74.36944
Country United States
State New York
County Montgomery
Government
  MayorLinda Petterson-Law
  Street and Water SuperintendentRonald Kasza
  ClerkVickie Romano
Area
[1]
  Total0.52 sq mi (1.35 km2)
  Land0.48 sq mi (1.24 km2)
  Water0.04 sq mi (0.11 km2)
Elevation
289 ft (88 m)
Population
 (2020)
  Total742
  Density1,555.56/sq mi (600.55/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP codes
12016, 12072
Area code 518
FIPS code 36-27859
GNIS feature ID0950807
Website Village website


Fultonville Historic District
NRHP reference No. 100004242
Designated HDAugust 8, 2019

Fultonville is a village in Montgomery County, New York, United States. The village is named after Robert Fulton, inventor of the steamboat. [2]

Contents

The Fultonville Village is on the south bank of the Mohawk River in the Town of Glen. It is west of Amsterdam, and is often referred to as South Fonda.

In 2019, the area of the village that had been in developed in the 19th and early 20th centuries was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Fultonville Historic District in recognition of its well-preserved architecture from its original settlement, the era centering around the development of the Erie Canal, and afterwards. [3]

History

The area was located near to the site of the Mohawk village of Andagaron during the middle of the seventeenth century, which was located about a mile to the west. [4]

John Evart Van Epps house, Fultonville, NY, c.1936, front view. This building built c.1800 J.E.VanEpps House.jpg
John Evart Van Epps house, Fultonville, NY, c.1936, front view. This building built c.1800

The first white settlement on the site was made around 1750 by John Evart Van Epps, and was called "Van Epps Swamp" due to the swampland by the river. During the American Revolution, the homes that were located here were burned. [5]

Lithograph of Fultonville from 1889 by L.R. Burleigh including list of landmarks Fultonville, N.Y. LOC 2007625475.jpg
Lithograph of Fultonville from 1889 by L.R. Burleigh including list of landmarks

The village was founded around 1824 in anticipation of the opening of the Erie Canal, and the West Shore Railroad ran through Fultonville, and had a station there as of 1889. The West Shore was later absorbed into the New York Central system. Fultonville was incorporated as a village on August 9, 1848.

John Henry Starin was born in August of 1825 in Sammonsville on the north side of the Mohawk, when the Erie Canal was in its infancy. His father, Myndert, had a tavern along the river, and his grandfather John was a farmer who had served in the military during the American Revolution. The family was successful and had some money, but Starin would become one of the richest men in America as president of the Starin City River & Harbor Transportation Co. and as director of the North River Bank in New York City and the Fultonville National Bank.

Original Trustees

Mayors

2016 presidential election

At the time of incorporation, the village's population numbered 630. In 1875, the population had increased to 1220.

Attractions

Poplar Mist boat tours

With operations commencing in 1993, the Poplar Hotel/Restaurant offered a two and a half hour boat trip down the Mohawk River on a 102-passenger boat from mid-May through mid-October.

Cobblestone Hall and Free Library

Cobblestone Hall and Free Library Cobblestone Hall and Free Library.jpg
Cobblestone Hall and Free Library

Cobblestone Hall and Free Library was built sometime before 1868 when the house belonged to C. B. Freeman. Freeman was the proprietor of Fultonville Steam Mills. He lived at this residence until at least 1878 when F. W. Beers published a history of Montgomery and Fulton Counties. By 1905, a large wooden addition had been made to the rear of the building which was then called "Cobblestone Free Hall and Library." The building still stands, minus the addition, and is a private residence.

Geography

Fultonville is located at 42°56′48″N74°22′10″W / 42.94667°N 74.36944°W / 42.94667; -74.36944 (42.946764, -74.369395). [7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village covers a total area of 0.5 square miles (1.3 km2), of which 0.5 square miles (1.3 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) is water.

The village is on the south bank of the Mohawk River with the Village of Fonda on the opposite shore, linked by a bridge carrying NY-30A. The Mohawk River is part of the Erie Canal at this location.

The New York State Thruway (Interstate 90) passes through the community. New York State Route 5S (Maple Avenue), parallels the Thruway and intersects New York State Route 30A (Main Street) in Fultonville.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1870 1,117
1880 881−21.1%
1890 1,12227.4%
1900 977−12.9%
1910 812−16.9%
1920 8697.0%
1930 831−4.4%
1940 806−3.0%
1950 8404.2%
1960 815−3.0%
1970 812−0.4%
1980 777−4.3%
1990 748−3.7%
2000 710−5.1%
2010 78410.4%
2020 742−5.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]

As of the census [9] of 2000, 710 people, 279 households, and 191 families resided in the village. The population density was 1,590.0 people per square mile (571.1/km2). The 309 housing units create an average density of 642.8 per square mile (248.6/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 99.00% White, 1.00% Latino. A total of 99.52% spoke English, 0.36% spoke German and 0.12% spoke Polish.

33.0% of households had children under age 18 living with them. 44.4% were married couples living together. 17.6% had a female householder with no husband present. 31.2% were non-families. 25.8% of all households were made up of single individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone aged 65+. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.96.

27.7% were under age 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 26.9% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% who were 65+. The median age was 35. For every 100 females, the village hosted 87.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.6 males.

The median household income was $32,361, and the median family income was $34,167. Males had a median income of $30,500 versus $20,909 for females. The per capita income for the village was $15,283. About 3.4% of families and 6.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Fultonville area residents attend the Fonda-Fultonville Central School District, located in Fonda.

Religion

Cemeteries

See also

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References

  1. "ArcGIS REST Services Directory". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 20, 2022.
  2. Zurlo, Sam (15 April 1996). "Area place names reflect local history and personalities". The Daily Gazette . pp. B5. Retrieved 23 April 2015.
  3. "Weekly List 20190809". U.S. National Park Service. August 8, 2019. Retrieved August 17, 2019.
  4. Greene, Nelson, ed. (1925). History of the Mohawk Valley: Gateway to the West 1614-1925. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. Retrieved Nov 29, 2018.
  5. "John E. Van Eps House". rooteweb.com. Retrieved Nov 29, 2018.
  6. Frisch, Morgan (3 May 2017). "Weitz, Dimezzas resign from positions in Fultonville". The Recorder . Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  7. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  8. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  9. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.