Hartsville Nuclear Plant

Last updated

The Hartsville Nuclear Plant is a canceled nuclear power plant project located near Hartsville, Tennessee. To be built and operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority, it was to have four General Electric boiling water reactors.

A cooling tower from the canceled plant Hartsville-cooling-tower-tn1.jpg
A cooling tower from the canceled plant

Land along the Cumberland River was acquired by TVA in the late 1960s for construction of the plant which was to accommodate the electricity demand for the 1980s. Construction began in 1975. The Plant B reactors were canceled on March 22, 1983 and the Plant A reactors were canceled on August 29, 1984. [1]

There are currently plans to turn 550 acres (220 ha) of the 1,940-acre (790 ha) property into an industrial park [1] similar to what became of the Satsop Nuclear Plant in Washington. The Trousdale Turner Correctional Center, a private prison operated by CoreCivic, began operations on the site in 2016.

Related Research Articles

Tennessee Valley Authority American utility company

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is a federally-owned electric utility corporation in the United States. TVA's service area covers all of Tennessee, portions of Alabama, Mississippi, and Kentucky, and small areas of Georgia, North Carolina, and Virginia. While owned by the federal government, TVA receives no taxpayer funding and operates similar to a private for-profit company. It is headquartered in Knoxville, Tennessee, and is the sixth largest power supplier and largest public utility in the country.

Hartsville, Tennessee Consolidated city-county in Tennessee, United States

Hartsville is a town in Trousdale County, Tennessee, United States. It is the county seat of Trousdale County, with which it shares a consolidated city-county government. The population of Hartsville was 7,870 as of 2010.

Savannah River Site Nuclear reservation in the US

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reservation in the United States in the state of South Carolina, located on land in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell counties adjacent to the Savannah River, 25 miles (40 km) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The site was built during the 1950s to refine nuclear materials for deployment in nuclear weapons. It covers 310 square miles (800 km2) and employs more than 10,000 people.

Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Nuclear power plant located on Tennessee River, Alabama

The Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant is located on the Tennessee River near Decatur and Athens, Alabama, on the north side of Wheeler Lake. The site has three General Electric boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear generating units and is owned entirely by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). With a generating capacity of nearly 3.8 gigawatts, it is the second most powerful nuclear plant in the United States, behind the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station in Arizona, and the most powerful generating station operated by TVA.

Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Nuclear power plant in Hamilton County, Tennessee

The Sequoyah Nuclear Plant is a nuclear power plant located on 525 acres (212 ha) located 7 miles (11 km) east of Soddy-Daisy, Tennessee, and 20 miles (32 km) north of Chattanooga, abutting Chickamauga Lake, on the Tennessee River. The facility is owned and operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Nuclear power plant in Rhea County, Tennessee

The Watts Bar Nuclear Plant is a Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) nuclear reactor pair used for electric power generation. It is located on a 1,770-acre (7.2 km²) site in Rhea County, Tennessee, near Spring City, between the cities of Chattanooga and Knoxville. Watts Bar supplies enough electricity for about 1,200,000 households in the Tennessee Valley.

Bellefonte Nuclear Plant Unfinished nuclear power plant located in Hollywood, Alabama

The Bellefonte Nuclear Generating Station (BLN) is an unfinished nuclear power plant in Hollywood, Alabama, United States.

The Black Fox Nuclear Power Plant was a nuclear power plant proposed by the Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO) in May 1973. It was cancelled in 1982.

Pickwick Landing Dam Dam in Tennessee, United States

Pickwick Landing Dam is a hydroelectric dam on the Tennessee River in Hardin County, in the U.S. state of Tennessee. The dam is one of nine dams on the river owned and operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority, which built the dam in the 1930s as part of a New Deal-era initiative to create a continuous navigation channel between the river's mouth and Knoxville, and bring economic development to the area. The dam impounds the 43,100-acre (17,400 ha) Pickwick Lake and its tailwaters are part of Kentucky Lake.

Chickamauga Dam Dam in Tennessee, United States

The Chickamauga Dam is a hydroelectric dam on the Tennessee River in Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States. The dam is owned and operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority, which built the dam in the late 1930s as part of a New Deal era initiative to improve navigation and bring flood control and economic development to the Tennessee Valley. The dam impounds the 36,240-acre (14,670 ha) Chickamauga Lake and feeds into Nickajack Lake. The dam and associated infrastructure were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2017.

Clinch River Nuclear Site Proposed nuclear reactor site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

The Clinch River Nuclear Site (CRNS) is a project site owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). It was once proposed as the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the U.S. electric power industry to design and construct a sodium-cooled fast-neutron nuclear reactor. The project was opposed by President Carter.

Great Falls Dam (Tennessee) United States historic place

Great Falls Dam is a hydroelectric dam on the Caney Fork, straddling the county line between White County and Warren County in the U.S. state of Tennessee. It is the only dam outside the Tennessee River watershed owned and operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority. The dam impounds the 1,830-acre (740 ha) Great Falls Lake, and its tailwaters feed into Center Hill Lake. The completion of Great Falls Dam in late 1916 was an engineering triumph, marking the first successful attempt to impound the volatile and flood-prone Caney Fork. The dam is also notable for its design, utilizing a mostly underground conduit to carry water from the reservoir via a tributary to the Power House 0.75 miles (1.21 km) downstream from the dam.

Cherokee Dam Dam in Tennessee, United States

Cherokee Dam is a hydroelectric dam located on the Holston River in Grainger County and Jefferson County, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. The dam is operated and maintained by the Tennessee Valley Authority, which built the dam in the early 1940s to help meet urgent demands for energy at the outbreak of World War II. Cherokee Dam is 175 feet (53 m) high and impounds the 28,780-acre (11,650 ha) Cherokee Lake. It has a generating capacity of 136 megawatts. The dam was named for the Cherokee, a Native American tribe that controlled much of East Tennessee when the first European settlers arrived in the mid-18th century.

Fort Patrick Henry Dam Dam in Tennessee, United States

Fort Patrick Henry Dam is a hydroelectric dam on the South Fork Holston River within the city of Kingsport, in Sullivan County in the U.S. state of Tennessee. It is the lowermost of three dams on the South Fork Holston owned and operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority, which built the dam in the early 1950s to take advantage of the hydroelectric potential created by the regulation of river flow with the completion of Watauga Dam, South Holston Dam, and Boone Dam further upstream in preceding years. The dam impounds the 872-acre (353 ha) Fort Patrick Henry Lake. While originally built for hydroelectric generation, the dam now plays an important role in the regulation of water flow and water temperature for the John Sevier Fossil Plant and other industrial plants downstream. The dam and associated infrastructure were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2017.

WNP-1 and WNP-4

Washington Nuclear Project Nos. 1 and 4, abbreviated as WNP-1 and WNP-4 were two of the five nuclear power plants on which construction was started by the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) in order to meet projected electricity demand in the Pacific Northwest. WNP-1, WNP-2 and WNP-3 were part of the original 1968 plan, with WNP-4 and WNP-5 added in the early 1970s.

Yellow Creek Nuclear Plant

The Yellow Creek Nuclear Plant is a canceled nuclear power plant project near Iuka, Mississippi. It was originally planned to have two 1,350-MW (output) reactors operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The steam turbine-generator sets were provided by General Electric.

Clinton Engineer Works Manhattan Project uranium enrichment facility

The Clinton Engineer Works (CEW) was the production installation of the Manhattan Project that during World War II produced the enriched uranium used in the 1945 bombing of Hiroshima, as well as the first examples of reactor-produced plutonium. It consisted of production facilities arranged at three major sites, various utilities including a power plant, and the town of Oak Ridge. It was in East Tennessee, about 18 miles (29 km) west of Knoxville, and was named after the town of Clinton, eight miles (13 km) to the north. The production facilities were mainly in Roane County, and the northern part of the site was in Anderson County. The Manhattan District Engineer, Kenneth Nichols, moved the Manhattan District headquarters from Manhattan to Oak Ridge in August 1943. During the war, Clinton's advanced research was managed for the government by the University of Chicago.

Phipps Bend Nuclear Plant Uncompleted nuclear power plant in Hawkins County, Tennessee

Phipps Bend Nuclear Plant was a planned nuclear power generation facility that was to be constructed and operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in unincorporated Hawkins County, Tennessee. Proposed to house two reactor units, the power plant was estimated to cost $1.6 billion when it was first planned in late 1977, provide a generating capacity of 2,600,000 kilowatts. Following negative public reactions towards nuclear energy following the Three Mile Island accident and a decreasing demand for power due to regional economic decline, the TVA's board of directors voted to defer further construction of the power plant. By 1981, the plant was 40% complete and an estimated $1.5 billion in planning, engineering, and construction costs had accumulated. Construction never resumed, and the project was canceled overall in 1982 due to lower load growth than forecast. By the project's cancellation, the TVA had amassed over $2.6 billion in spending for the uncomplete nuclear facility. After being auctioned off by the TVA in 1987, the land acquired for the plant would be under the ownership of Hawkins County's industrial development board, who converted most of the site into an industrial park. A 1 MW solar farm was built at the site in 2017.

Watts Bar Steam Plant

Watts Bar Steam Plant was a 267-megawatt (MW), coal power plant operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) located in Rhea County, Tennessee near the present site of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant and Watts Bar Dam. The plant was the first coal-fired power plant constructed by TVA.

References

  1. 1 2 Tennessee Valley Authority. "Hartsville Nuclear Plant Site, Transfer of TVA Property For Industrial Park" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on January 5, 2009. Retrieved August 28, 2009.

Coordinates: 36°20′57.00″N86°5′3.00″W / 36.3491667°N 86.0841667°W / 36.3491667; -86.0841667