Trousdale County, Tennessee

Last updated

Trousdale County
Hartsville-Trousdale County
Trousdale-county-courthouse-tn1.jpg
Trousdale County Courthouse in Hartsville
Map of Tennessee highlighting Trousdale County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Tennessee
Tennessee in United States.svg
Tennessee's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°23′N86°10′W / 36.39°N 86.16°W / 36.39; -86.16
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Tennessee.svg  Tennessee
FoundedSeptember 5, 1870 [1]
Named for William Trousdale [2]
Seat Hartsville
Largest townHartsville
Area
  Total117 sq mi (300 km2)
  Land114 sq mi (300 km2)
  Water2.5 sq mi (6 km2)  2.1%%
Population
 (2020)
  Total11,615 Increase2.svg
  Density69/sq mi (27/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 6th
Website www.trousdalecountytn.gov

Trousdale County, also known as Hartsville/Trousdale County, [3] is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 11,615. [4] Its county seat is Hartsville, [5] with which it shares a uniquely formed consolidated city-county government. With an area of just 117 square miles (300 km2), it is Tennessee's smallest county.

Contents

Trousdale County is part of the Nashville-Davidson Murfreesboro Franklin, TN Metropolitan Statistical Area, although it is located just beyond the ring of "bedroom communities" in the Nashville metropolitan area. Farming and livestock-raising characterize this largely rural area.

Hartsville is the county seat of Trousdale County and now coextensive with it as a metropolitan government by virtue of a referendum which passed in Trousdale County by a single vote. Trousdale County High School is located here, as well as a technical school operated by the Tennessee Board of Regents. Trousdale County is one of two counties in Tennessee to have legalized parimutuel betting on horse racing, but no group has ever stepped forward to build a racetrack. [6]

In 2016, Corrections Corporation of America (since renamed CoreCivic) opened the Trousdale Turner Correctional Center in Hartsville. Its approximately 2,500 prisoners comprise over a fifth of the county's residents and nearly 12% of Tennessee state prisoners. [7] The prison became a hot spot for COVID-19 cases during the COVID-19 pandemic, giving the county the highest incidence rate in the U.S. in May 2020, with 1 in 7 residents known to be infected with coronavirus. [8]

History

Trousdale County was formed in 1870 from parts of Macon, Smith, Sumner and Wilson counties. It was named for William Trousdale (1790–1872), Brigadier General in the Mexican War, Governor of Tennessee, 1849–1851, and U.S. Minister to Brazil, 18531857. Hartsvillians had initially sought the creation of their own, separate county in 1849, but the effort failed.

On December 7, 1862, The Battle of Hartsville occurred within the boundaries of the county (although Trousdale County was not officially a county until 1870), with the Confederate forces under John Hunt Morgan defeating the Union forces of Absalom B. Moore in a surprise attack on their campsite. Morgan captured most of the Union forces and marched them South to Lebanon, Tennessee.

In the early part of the 20th century, a series of floods left the county seat devastated, with some floodwaters reaching flood stage of nine to twelve feet. There are photographs showing residents of the county canoeing in front of the flooded courthouse. [9] During the Second World War, American infantry often trained in Trousdale County, simulating battles and participating in minor war games on the countryside owned by local farmers. After the war, the county flourished with the railroad running through the county. However, after the trains stopped running through the county, business slowed and suffered economically.

In 2020, an outbreak of COVID-19 at the Trousdale Turner Correctional Center, a privately operated prison, made Trousdale County the county with the highest per capita infection rate in the United States as of May 5, 2020. As of May 8, 1,284 prisoners at Trousdale had tested positive for the coronavirus, as had 50 employees and contractors at the facility. [10]

Geography

Hartsville area Hartsville-tennessee-greentop.jpg
Hartsville area

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 117 square miles (300 km2), of which 114 square miles (300 km2) is land and 2.5 square miles (6.5 km2) (2.1%) is water. [11] It is the smallest county by area in Tennessee.

Adjacent counties

State protected areas

Highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 6,646
1890 5,850−12.0%
1900 6,0042.6%
1910 5,874−2.2%
1920 5,9962.1%
1930 5,629−6.1%
1940 6,1138.6%
1950 5,520−9.7%
1960 4,914−11.0%
1970 5,1554.9%
1980 6,13719.0%
1990 5,920−3.5%
2000 7,25922.6%
2010 7,8708.4%
2020 11,61547.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [12]
1790-1960 [13] 1900-1990 [14]
1990-2000 [15] 2010-2014 [4]
Age pyramid Trousdale County USA Trousdale County, Tennessee.csv age pyramid.svg
Age pyramid Trousdale County

2020 census

Trousdale County racial composition [17]
RaceNumberPercentage
White (non-Hispanic)8,78675.64%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)1,91716.5%
Native American 260.22%
Asian 270.23%
Other/Mixed 4844.17%
Hispanic or Latino 3753.23%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 11,615 people, 3,189 households, and 2,083 families residing in the county.

2000 census

As of the census [18] of 2000, there were 7,259 people, 2,780 households, and 2,034 families residing in the county. The population density was 64 people per square mile (25/km2). There were 3,095 housing units at an average density of 27 per square mile (10/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 86.57% White, 11.35% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.99% from other races, and 0.72% from two or more races. 1.52% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,780 households, out of which 31.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.30% were married couples living together, 11.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.80% were non-families. 23.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.20% under the age of 18, 8.50% from 18 to 24, 28.10% from 25 to 44, 24.90% from 45 to 64, and 14.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,212, and the median income for a family was $37,401. Males had a median income of $27,466 versus $21,207 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,838. About 9.70% of families and 13.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.00% of those under age 18 and 20.00% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

The old Methodist Church building in Hartsville Hartsville-methodist-church-tn1.jpg
The old Methodist Church building in Hartsville

Hartsville, the county seat, is the only officially constituted municipality in Trousdale County. Unincorporated communities include:

Politics

United States presidential election results for Trousdale County, Tennessee [19]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 2,93673.44%1,01225.31%501.25%
2016 2,10366.55%94629.94%1113.51%
2012 1,61255.49%1,24042.69%531.82%
2008 1,68852.11%1,47545.54%762.35%
2004 1,31441.18%1,85158.01%260.81%
2000 95032.26%1,96666.76%290.98%
1996 68327.33%1,61564.63%2018.04%
1992 56521.21%1,84669.29%2539.50%
1988 96944.59%1,19354.90%110.51%
1984 78140.36%1,14259.02%120.62%
1980 62926.72%1,67471.11%512.17%
1976 33219.24%1,38580.24%90.52%
1972 66353.90%53943.82%282.28%
1968 25215.80%69443.51%64940.69%
1964 20513.90%1,27086.10%00.00%
1960 30822.71%1,03676.40%120.88%
1956 20916.76%1,03282.76%60.48%
1952 26117.43%1,23682.57%00.00%
1948 1048.46%1,01482.51%1119.03%
1944 13110.05%1,17089.72%30.23%
1940 949.17%92990.63%20.20%
1936 728.58%76591.18%20.24%
1932 647.11%83592.78%10.11%
1928 17922.74%60777.13%10.13%
1924 14317.21%68482.31%40.48%
1920 57437.52%95562.42%10.07%
1916 21723.98%68876.02%00.00%
1912 21126.71%54468.86%354.43%


See also

Related Research Articles

Clay County, Tennessee County in Tennessee, United States

Clay County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 7,581. Its county seat and only incorporated city is Celina. Clay County is named in honor of American statesman Henry Clay, member of the United States Senate from Kentucky and United States Secretary of State in the 19th century. Its mayor is Dale Reagan.

Wilson County, Tennessee County in Tennessee, United States

Wilson County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. It is in Middle Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 147,737. Its county seat is Lebanon. The largest city is Mt. Juliet. Wilson County is part of the Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Sumner County, Tennessee County in Tennessee, United States

Sumner County is a county located on the central northern border of the U.S. state of Tennessee, in what is called Middle Tennessee.

Smith County, Tennessee County in Tennessee, United States

Smith County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 19,166. Smith County is located in the region of the state known as Middle Tennessee. Its county seat is Carthage. The county was organized in 1799 and is named for Daniel Smith, a Revolutionary War veteran who made the first map of Tennessee and served as a United States senator.

Macon County, Tennessee County in Tennessee, United States

Macon County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,248. Its county seat is Lafayette. Macon County is part of the Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Lewis County, Tennessee County in Tennessee, United States

Lewis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,161. Its county seat is Hohenwald. The county is named for explorer Meriwether Lewis, who died and was buried at Grinder's Stand near Hohenwald in 1809.

Hardeman County, Tennessee County in Tennessee, United States

Hardeman County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 25,462. Its county seat is Bolivar.

Hancock County, Tennessee County in Tennessee, United States

Hancock County is a county located in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 6,662, making it the fourth-least populous county in Tennessee. Its county seat is Sneedville.

Dyer County, Tennessee County in Tennessee, United States

Dyer County is a county located in the westernmost part of the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 36,801. The county seat is Dyersburg. Dyer County comprises the Dyersburg, TN Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Bledsoe County, Tennessee County in Tennessee, United States

Bledsoe County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 census, the population was 14,913. Its county seat is Pikeville.

Darlington County, South Carolina County in South Carolina, United States

Darlington County is a county in the U.S. state of South Carolina. As of the 2010 census, its population was 67,234. Its county seat is Darlington. Hartsville is the largest city in the county. Darlington County is home to the Darlington Raceway, which hosts the annual NASCAR Southern 500. Darlington County is also home to Coker College in Hartsville. Darlington County was named by an act in March 1785.

Cibola County, New Mexico County in New Mexico, United States

Cibola County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,213. Its county seat is Grants. It is New Mexico's youngest county, and the third youngest county in the United States, created on June 19, 1981, from the westernmost four-fifths of the formerly much larger Valencia County.

Hartsville, Indiana Town in Indiana, United States

Hartsville is a town in Haw Creek and Clifty townships, Bartholomew County, Indiana, United States. The population was 362 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Columbus, Indiana metropolitan statistical area.

Hartsville is a town in Steuben County, New York, United States. The population was 585 at the 2000 census. The town is named after a prominent early settler, Reuben Hart.

North Hartsville, South Carolina Census-designated place in South Carolina, United States

North Hartsville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Darlington County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 3,251 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Florence Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Hartsville Urban Cluster.

Toone, Tennessee Town in Tennessee, United States

Toone is a town in Hardeman County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 364 at the 2010 census.

Sardis, Tennessee Town in Tennessee, United States

Sardis is a town in Henderson County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 381 at the 2010 census.

Carthage, Tennessee Town in Tennessee, United States

Carthage is a town in and the county seat of Smith County, Tennessee, United States; it is part of the Nashville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 2,306 at the 2010 census. It is located on the Cumberland River, which was important to its early development. It is likely best known as the hometown of former Vice President and Senator Al Gore of the Democratic Party and his father, Senator Albert Gore, Sr. The younger Gore announced his 1988 and 2000 presidential bids, as well as his 1992 vice-presidential bid, from the steps of the Smith County Courthouse.

Hartsville, Tennessee Consolidated city-county in Tennessee, United States

Hartsville is a town in Trousdale County, Tennessee, United States. It is the county seat of Trousdale County, with which it shares a consolidated city-county government. The population of Hartsville was 7,870 as of 2010.

Waynesboro, Tennessee City in Tennessee, United States

Waynesboro is a city in and the county seat of Wayne County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 2,449 at the 2010 census, up from 2,228 in 2000.

References

  1. "Genealogy Inc. Trousdale County, Tennessee Facts. Retrieved: 12 June 2016.
  2. Jeffrey Durbin, "Trousdale County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: 19 April 2013.
  3. Hartsville/Trousdale County, USA.com. Retrieved: 6 November 2013.
  4. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on October 13, 2015. Retrieved December 7, 2013.
  5. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  6. Ridley Wills II, "Thoroughbred Horse Breeding and Racing." The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture, 2009. Retrieved: 11 February 2013.
  7. Tennessee Department of Correction (April 30, 2020), Tennessee Bed Space and Operating Capacities Report (PDF)
  8. See "Coronavirus in the U.S.: Latest Map and Case Count" The New York Times May 15, 2020.
  9. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on February 5, 2020. Retrieved February 5, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. Finley, Jeremy (May 8, 2020). "Recorded conversations reveal life inside prison ravaged by COVID-19". WSMV Nashville. Retrieved May 8, 2020.
  11. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  12. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  13. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  14. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  15. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved April 14, 2015.
  16. Based on 2000 census data
  17. "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 24, 2021.
  18. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  19. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 12, 2020.

Coordinates: 36°23′N86°10′W / 36.39°N 86.16°W / 36.39; -86.16