Jefferson County, Tennessee

Last updated
Jefferson County
Jefferson-county-courthouse-tn1.jpg
Jefferson County Courthouse in Dandridge
Jeffersoncotnseal.jpg
Seal
Map of Tennessee highlighting Jefferson County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Tennessee
Tennessee in United States.svg
Tennessee's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°03′N83°27′W / 36.05°N 83.45°W / 36.05; -83.45
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Tennessee.svg  Tennessee
FoundedJune 11, 1792
Named for Thomas Jefferson [1]
Seat Dandridge
Largest city Jefferson City
Area
  Total314 sq mi (810 km2)
  Land274 sq mi (710 km2)
  Water40 sq mi (100 km2)  13%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2018)
54,012
  Density195/sq mi (75/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 (Eastern)
  Summer (DST) UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts 1st, 2nd
Website jeffersoncountytn.gov

Jefferson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 51,407. [2] Its county seat is Dandridge. [3]

Contents

Jefferson County is part of the Morristown, TN Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as the Knoxville-Morristown-Sevierville, TN Combined Statistical Area. [4]

History

Jefferson County was established on June 11, 1792, by William Blount, Governor of the Southwest Territory. [5] It had been a part of Caswell County during the State of Franklin period (17841789). Its county seat, Dandridge, was settled in 1783. [5]

On the eve of the Civil War, Jefferson County, like most other counties in mountainous East Tennessee, was opposed to secession. In Tennessee's Ordinance of Secession referendum on June 8, 1861, Jefferson County voters rejected secession by a margin of 1,987 to 603. [6] A railroad bridge at Strawberry Plains was among those targeted by the East Tennessee bridge-burning conspiracy in November 1861. [7] This led to internal conflict in the area throughout the war, with men from the county enlisting in both of the rival armies.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 314 square miles (810 km2), of which 274 square miles (710 km2) is land and 40 square miles (100 km2) (13%) is water. [8] The county is affected by two artificial lakes: Douglas Lake, created by the damming of the French Broad River in the south, and Cherokee Lake, created by the damming of the Holston River in the north.

Adjacent counties

State protected areas

Major Highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1810 7,309
1820 8,95322.5%
1830 11,80131.8%
1840 12,0762.3%
1850 13,2049.3%
1860 16,04321.5%
1870 19,47621.4%
1880 15,846−18.6%
1890 16,4784.0%
1900 18,59012.8%
1910 17,755−4.5%
1920 17,677−0.4%
1930 17,9141.3%
1940 18,6213.9%
1950 19,6675.6%
1960 21,4939.3%
1970 24,94016.0%
1980 31,28425.4%
1990 33,0165.5%
2000 44,29434.2%
2010 51,40716.1%
Est. 201854,012 [9] 5.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]
1790-1960 [11] 1900-1990 [12]
1990-2000 [13] 2010-2014 [2]
Age pyramid Jefferson County USA Jefferson County, Tennessee.csv age pyramid.svg
Age pyramid Jefferson County

As of the census [15] of 2000, there were 44,294 people, 17,155 households, and 12,608 families residing in the county. The population density was 162 people per square mile (62/km²). There were 19,319 housing units at an average density of 71 per square mile (27/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.66% White, 2.32% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.63% from other races, and 0.77% from two or more races. 1.33% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 17,155 households out of which 31.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.90% were married couples living together, 9.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.50% were non-families. 22.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.90% under the age of 18, 10.60% from 18 to 24, 29.10% from 25 to 44, 24.50% from 45 to 64, and 12.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.00 males. However, the last statistic is somewhat misleading because of female longevity, and if adults 18-65 were considered, the numbers would be very close to equal.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,824, and the median income for a family was $38,537. Males had a median income of $29,123 versus $20,269 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,841. About 9.60% of families and 13.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.90% of those under age 18 and 12.60% of those age 65 or over.

Politics and government

Presidential election results
Presidential Elections Results [16]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 77.5%14,77618.3% 3,4944.2% 802
2012 74.3%13,03824.1% 4,2321.7% 289
2008 70.7%13,09227.9% 5,1781.4% 262
2004 67.5%11,62531.8% 5,4690.7% 121
2000 61.5%8,65737.1% 5,2261.5% 204
1996 53.0%6,44638.6% 4,6888.4% 1,021
1992 50.0%6,18438.3% 4,74011.6% 1,438
1988 67.9%6,83231.5% 3,1680.7% 69
1984 70.4%7,72129.0% 3,1850.6% 69
1980 66.8%6,94430.6% 3,1802.6% 268
1976 57.2%5,45941.9% 3,9950.9% 84
1972 80.3%5,92518.4% 1,3571.4% 100
1968 67.1%5,49418.3% 1,49414.7% 1,199
1964 65.4%4,92334.6% 2,600
1960 78.8%6,14120.8% 1,6200.4% 33
1956 77.6%4,87021.3% 1,3381.0% 65
1952 78.9%4,62221.0% 1,2280.2% 10
1948 74.1%2,97922.4% 9003.5% 140
1944 76.3%3,15923.3% 9660.4% 18
1940 64.0%1,92135.4% 1,0620.7% 21
1936 68.3%2,35631.3% 1,0790.4% 13
1932 68.6%2,27529.4% 9752.0% 67
1928 85.6%2,58214.5% 436
1924 78.4%2,69920.7% 7120.9% 32
1920 81.6%3,58316.9% 7411.6% 68
1916 75.8%1,64823.9% 5200.2% 5
1912 27.0% 54025.7% 51447.4%949

Like all of Unionist East Tennessee, Jefferson County has been overwhelmingly Republican ever since the Civil War. No Democrat has carried the county in the century and a half since that time, and indeed only Southern Democrat Jimmy Carter in 1976 has managed to reach forty percent of Jefferson County's vote.

Jefferson County's current mayor is Mark Potts. The county has 21 commissioners, two from each of the ten districts, with White Pine electing three.

Education

K-12 public education in the county is conducted by Jefferson County Public Schools.

Communities

Cities

Towns

Unincorporated communities

See also

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White Pine, Tennessee Town in Tennessee, United States

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References

  1. Origins Of Tennessee County Names, Tennessee Blue Book 2005-2006, pages 508-513
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved December 3, 2013.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. "Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 19, 2013. Retrieved April 27, 2014.
  5. 1 2 Estle Muncy, "Jefferson County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: 18 October 2013.
  6. Oliver Perry Temple, East Tennessee and the Civil War (R. Clarke Company, 1899), p. 199.
  7. Temple, East Tennessee and the Civil War, pp. 370-406.
  8. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  9. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved July 20, 2018.
  10. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  11. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  12. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  13. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  14. Based on 2000 census data
  15. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-12. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  16. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-11.

Coordinates: 36°03′N83°27′W / 36.05°N 83.45°W / 36.05; -83.45