Obion County, Tennessee

Last updated

Obion County
Obion County Court House Union City TN 2013-04-06 007.jpg
Obion County Courthouse
Map of Tennessee highlighting Obion County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Tennessee
Tennessee in United States.svg
Tennessee's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°22′N89°09′W / 36.36°N 89.15°W / 36.36; -89.15
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Tennessee.svg  Tennessee
Founded1824 [1]
Named for Obion River [1]
Seat Union City
Largest cityUnion City
Government
  MayorSteve Carr [2]
Area
  Total556 sq mi (1,440 km2)
  Land545 sq mi (1,410 km2)
  Water11 sq mi (30 km2)  1.9%
Population
 (2020)
  Total30,787 Decrease2.svg
  Density58/sq mi (22/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 8th
Website www.obioncountytn.gov
Reelfoot Lake Reelfoot Lake State Park Cypress Boardwalk Obion County TN 2013-04-06 033.jpg
Reelfoot Lake

Obion County is a county located in the northwest corner of the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 31,807. [3] The county seat is Union City. [4] The county was formed in 1823 and organized in 1824. [1] It was named after the Obion River. [5]

Contents

Obion County is part of the Union City, TN–KY Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Martin–Union City, TN Combined Statistical Area.

History

In the year, 1811 there was a large seismic activity located on the New Madrid Fault Line. The series of earthquakes, while devastating, formed Reelfoot Lake.

Obion was later established in 1823 and organized the following year. It was named for the Obion River, which flows through the county and is a tributary of the nearby Mississippi River. The word "Obion" is believed to be derived from a Native American word meaning "many forks," or from an Irish trapper named O'Brien. [1] [6] [7] [8]

The founding of Obion County originally came from the expansion of railroads. The county has since moved towards many agricultural and manufacturing productions. [9]

In 2013, Discovery Park of America opened in Union City. Discovery Park is a 50-acre encyclopedic museum and heritage park with exhibits pertaining to local and national history, military history, art, science, and technology.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 556 square miles (1,440 km2), of which 545 square miles (1,410 km2) is land and 11 square miles (28 km2) (1.9%) is water. [10] It is located in the "rolling hills of northwest Tennessee". [1]

Adjacent counties

National protected area

State protected areas

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1830 2,099
1840 4,814129.3%
1850 7,63358.6%
1860 12,81767.9%
1870 15,58421.6%
1880 22,91247.0%
1890 27,27319.0%
1900 28,2863.7%
1910 29,9465.9%
1920 28,393−5.2%
1930 29,0862.4%
1940 30,9786.5%
1950 29,056−6.2%
1960 26,957−7.2%
1970 29,93611.1%
1980 32,7819.5%
1990 31,717−3.2%
2000 32,4502.3%
2010 31,807−2.0%
2018 (est.)30,267 [11] −4.8%
U.S. Decennial Census [12]
1790-1960 [13] 1900-1990 [14]
1990-2000 [15] 2010-2014 [3]
Age pyramid for Obion County USA Obion County, Tennessee.csv age pyramid.svg
Age pyramid for Obion County

2020 census

Obion County racial composition [17]
RaceNum.Perc.
White (non-Hispanic)24,73680.35%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic)3,13710.19%
Native American 500.16%
Asian 1030.33%
Other/Mixed 1,1873.86%
Hispanic or Latino 1,5745.11%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 30,787 people, 12,717 households, and 8,389 families residing in the county.

2000 census

As of the census [18] of 2000, there were 32,450 people, 13,182 households, and 9,398 families residing in the county. The population density was 60 people per square mile (23/km2). There were 14,489 housing units at an average density of 27 per square mile (10/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 88.16% White, 9.85% Black or African American, 0.19% Asian, 0.14% Native American, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.91% from other races, and 0.71% from two or more races. 1.90% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 13,182 households, out of which 31.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.40% were married couples living together, 11.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.70% were non-families. 25.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.40% under the age of 18, 8.40% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 15.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,764, and the median income for a family was $40,533. Males had a median income of $32,963 versus $20,032 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,409. About 10.10% of families and 13.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.60% of those under age 18 and 15.10% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

United States presidential election results for Obion County, Tennessee [19]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 10,79079.80%2,58919.15%1421.05%
2016 9,52677.77%2,42619.81%2972.42%
2012 8,81471.68%3,32127.01%1621.32%
2008 8,87366.26%4,30832.17%2111.58%
2004 7,85958.06%5,54941.00%1270.94%
2000 6,16849.58%6,05648.68%2161.74%
1996 4,31037.36%6,22653.97%1,0008.67%
1992 4,81237.41%6,49750.51%1,55512.09%
1988 6,03755.60%4,78544.07%360.33%
1984 6,38456.74%4,76942.38%990.88%
1980 5,39747.49%5,76650.73%2021.78%
1976 2,98628.93%7,20469.81%1301.26%
1972 5,80070.36%2,24327.21%2002.43%
1968 2,42025.92%2,23523.94%4,68050.13%
1964 2,80233.07%5,67266.93%00.00%
1960 3,80046.36%4,24451.78%1521.85%
1956 2,34930.76%5,18567.89%1031.35%
1952 2,68236.51%4,62362.94%400.54%
1948 64213.91%3,49075.59%48510.50%
1944 61514.31%3,67085.39%130.30%
1940 53610.91%4,36088.73%180.37%
1936 41710.06%3,72889.94%00.00%
1932 3349.36%3,18389.18%521.46%
1928 78924.05%2,49275.95%00.00%
1924 48512.87%3,22385.51%611.62%
1920 1,30722.25%4,54777.41%200.34%
1916 59115.59%3,17083.64%290.77%
1912 45515.89%2,15275.17%2568.94%


The county is part of District 77 of the Tennessee House of Representatives, currently represented by Republican Rusty Grills, and District 76, currently represented by Republican Tandy Darby. The county is part of District 24 of the Tennessee Senate, currently represented by Republican John Stevens. [20] At the federal level, it is part of the state's 8th congressional district, currently represented by Republican David Kustoff.

Education

Obion County Schools

School NameTeam MascotSchool ColorsSchool Website
Lake Road Elementary SchoolGeneralsBlue/Orange
Hillcrest Elementary SchoolCougarsRed/Navy Blue
Ridgemont Elementary SchoolMustangsRed/Yellow
Black Oak Elementary SchoolEaglesYellow/Blue
South Fulton Elementary SchoolRed DevilsRed/White
South Fulton Middle/High School Red DevilsRed/White
Obion County Central High School RebelsRed/White/Blue

Union City Schools

School NameTeam MascotSchool ColorsSchool Website
Union City Elementary SchoolTornadoesPurple/Gold 1
Union City Middle SchoolTornadoesPurple/Gold 1
Union City High SchoolTornadoesPurple/Gold 1

Attractions

Discovery Park of America in Union City. Discovery Center from the Northeast.jpg
Discovery Park of America in Union City.

Obion County is home to many attractions and activities.

Media

Other services

Obion County has a public library, with a 30,000-square-foot (2,800 m2) building and a catalog of over 70,000 books, video and audio materials. [23]

Residents of the county's unincorporated communities have the option of paying $75 per year if they want firefighting services from the city of South Fulton. [24] [25]

Communities

The Tower at Discovery Park of America The Tower at Discovery Park of America.jpg
The Tower at Discovery Park of America

Cities

Towns

Unincorporated communities

See also

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Obion, Tennessee</span> Town in Tennessee, United States

Obion is a town in Obion County, Tennessee, United States, along the Obion River. The population was 1,119 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Union City, TN–KY Micropolitan Statistical Area.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Samburg, Tennessee</span> Town in Tennessee, United States

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South Fulton is a city in Obion County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 2,245 at the 2020 census. It is part of the Union City, TN–KY Micropolitan Statistical Area.

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Troy is a town in Obion County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 1,423 at the 2020 census. It is part of the Union City, TN–KY Micropolitan Statistical Area.

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Union City is located in Obion County, Tennessee, United States. The 2020 census reported the population of the town as 11,170. It is the principal urban settlement of the surrounding micropolitan area, which includes Obion County and Fulton County, Kentucky. Union City is home to Discovery Park of America which is a world-renowned encyclopedic museum with many exhibits pertaining to local history, as well as state, national, and world history, science, technology, and art.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Woodland Mills, Tennessee</span> City in Tennessee, United States

Woodland Mills is a city in Obion County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 378 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Union City, TN–KY Micropolitan Statistical Area.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tennessee State Route 157</span> Highway in Tennessee

State Route 157 is a short secondary highway in northern Obion County, Tennessee.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 R.C. Forrester. "Obion County". Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
  2. "Steve Carr Wins Obion County Mayors Race". Thunderbolt Radio. Retrieved August 7, 2022.
  3. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved December 6, 2013.
  4. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  5. "Origins Of Tennessee County Names" (PDF). Tennessee Blue Book. 2005–2006. p. 512. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  6. Connection, Sportsman's (July 16, 2016). Western Tennessee Fishing Map Guide. Sportsman's Connection. ISBN   9781885010704 via Google Books.
  7. Miller, Larry L. (April 27, 2001). Tennessee Place-names. Indiana University Press. ISBN   0253214785 via Google Books.
  8. "Obion County, Tennessee: History and Information". www.ereferencedesk.com.
  9. "Obion County | Tennessee Encyclopedia". Tennessee Encyclopedia. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  10. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  11. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved July 20, 2019.
  12. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  13. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  14. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  15. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  16. Based on 2000 census data.
  17. "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  18. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  19. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  20. Senate District 24 from the website of the Tennessee General Assembly
  21. "Obion County, Tennessee - Home". obioncounty.org. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  22. "Obion County Fair – A Volunteer Tradition". www.obioncountyfair.net. Retrieved August 16, 2018.
  23. "About". Obion County Public Library. Archived from the original on October 26, 2013. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
  24. "Firefighters watch as home burns to the ground". WPSD-TV. September 30, 2010. Archived from the original on October 3, 2010. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
  25. Jason Hibbs (December 5, 2011). "Home burns while firefighters watch, again". WPSD-TV. Archived from the original on December 8, 2011. Retrieved December 6, 2011.

Coordinates: 36°22′N89°09′W / 36.36°N 89.15°W / 36.36; -89.15