Moore County, Tennessee

Last updated
Moore County
Moore County Courthouse in Lynchburg Tennessee 4-8-2010.jpg
Moore County Courthouse in Lynchburg
Map of Tennessee highlighting Moore County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Tennessee
Tennessee in United States.svg
Tennessee's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 35°17′N86°22′W / 35.28°N 86.36°W / 35.28; -86.36
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Tennessee.svg  Tennessee
Founded1871
Named for William Moore, state legislator [1]
Seat Lynchburg
Largest cityLynchburg
Area
  Total130 sq mi (300 km2)
  Land129 sq mi (330 km2)
  Water1.2 sq mi (3 km2)  0.9%%
Population
  Estimate 
(2018)
6,411
  Density49/sq mi (19/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
  Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district 4th
Website Government & Education Services

Moore County is a county located in the south central part of the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 6,362, [2] making it the third-least populous county in Tennessee. It forms a consolidated city-county government with its county seat of Lynchburg. [3]

Contents

With 130 square miles (340 km2), it is the second-smallest county in Tennessee, behind only Trousdale. The county was created in 1871, during the Reconstruction era. [1] [4] Moore County is part of the Tullahoma-Manchester, TN Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Moore County was established in 1871 from parts of Lincoln, Bedford and Franklin counties, and named in honor of General William Moore, an early settler and long-time member of the state legislature. [1] The new county originally contained about 300 square miles, but Lincoln County sued and successfully reclaimed a portion of its land, reducing the new county's size. [1]

Beginning in the 1820s, whiskey distilleries were developed in what is now Moore County. By 1875, fifteen distilleries were operating in the county. At the end of the 20th century, the Jack Daniel Distillery in Lynchburg was a major employer and the county's primary source of revenue. [1]

Because of the small size of this county, in the late 20th century city and county officials began to discuss creating a consolidated government in order to lower costs and improve services. In 1988, the Metropolitan Government of Lynchburg, Moore County, Tennessee was voted into law as the governing body of Moore County, including Lynchburg. [5] [6]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 130 square miles (340 km2), of which 129 square miles (330 km2) are land and 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2) (0.9%) are water. [7] It is the second-smallest county in Tennessee by area. The county is located partially on the rugged Highland Rim and partially in the flatter Nashville Basin. [1]

Adjacent counties

Protected area

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 6,233
1890 5,975−4.1%
1900 5,706−4.5%
1910 4,800−15.9%
1920 4,491−6.4%
1930 4,037−10.1%
1940 4,0931.4%
1950 3,948−3.5%
1960 3,454−12.5%
1970 3,5683.3%
1980 4,51026.4%
1990 4,7214.7%
2000 5,74021.6%
2010 6,36210.8%
Est. 20186,411 [8] 0.8%
U.S. Decennial Census [9]
1790-1960 [10] 1900-1990 [11]
1990-2000 [12] 2010-2014 [2]
Age pyramid Moore County USA Moore County, Tennessee.csv age pyramid.svg
Age pyramid Moore County

As of the census [14] of 2010, there were 6,362 people, 2,492 households, and 1,841 families residing in the county. There were 2,492 occupied housing units. The racial makeup of the county was 95.4% White, 2.3% Black or African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. 1.1% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,492 households, out of which 27% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.8% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.1% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older, male or female. The average household size was 2.51, and the average family size was 2.93.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.2% under the age of 20, 14.8% from 20 to 34, 20.5% from 35 to 49, 22.1% from 50 to 64, and 18.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.3 years.

Per 2000 Census data, the median income for a household in the county was $36,591, and the median income for a family was $41,484. Males had a median income of $31,559 versus $20,987 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,040. 9.6% of the population, and 7.8% of families were below the poverty line. 11.7% were under the age of 18, and 12.1% were 65 or older.

Economy

Moore County is the location of the Jack Daniel Distillery, whose famous brand of Tennessee whiskey is marketed worldwide. Despite the distillery, Moore is a dry county. [15] This status dates to the passage of state prohibition laws in the early 20th century.

While federal prohibition ended in 1933 with the repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment, state prohibition laws remain in effect. All Tennessee counties are dry by default, though any county can become "wet" by passing a county-wide "local option" referendum. Moore County has yet to pass such a referendum. [16]

Education

Schools in Moore County are a part of Moore County Schools, overseen by The Moore County Department of Education: [17]

Motlow State Community College is located in northern part of Moore County.

Politics

Presidential election results
Presidential Elections Results [18]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 79.5%2,32517.0% 4963.6% 105
2012 73.4%2,05325.2% 7051.5% 41
2008 68.1%2,01029.8% 8812.1% 61
2004 60.1%1,66839.1% 1,0840.8% 22
2000 49.8%1,14548.1% 1,1072.1% 49
1996 42.7% 84647.2%93510.1% 199
1992 30.8% 66153.7%1,15115.5% 333
1988 51.4%78647.8% 7310.9% 13
1984 51.4%86348.1% 8080.5% 9
1980 34.6% 55162.3%9933.2% 51
1976 22.9% 33176.0%1,1011.1% 16
1972 61.0%60835.7% 3563.2% 32
1968 15.7% 22424.3% 34660.0%856
1964 20.3% 26479.7%1,034
1960 26.4% 31372.7%8630.9% 11
1956 23.1% 27076.5%8930.3% 4
1952 30.0% 35470.0%826
1948 12.3% 10262.9%52324.8% 206
1944 16.2% 14383.8%742
1940 10.8% 10688.5%8690.7% 7
1936 12.2% 10187.2%7190.6% 5
1932 6.5% 6592.7%9230.8% 8
1928 23.3% 13375.5%4311.2% 7
1924 7.6% 4191.6%4920.7% 4
1920 15.3% 9084.7%497
1916 9.0% 7191.1%722
1912 14.1% 11684.4%6941.5% 12

See also

Related Research Articles

Trousdale County, Tennessee U.S. county in Tennessee

Trousdale County, also known as Hartsville/Trousdale County, is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,870. Its county seat is Hartsville, with which it shares a uniquely formed consolidated city-county government. With an area of just 117 square miles (300 km2), it is Tennessee's smallest county.

McNairy County, Tennessee U.S. county in Tennessee

McNairy County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 26,075. Its county seat is Selmer. McNairy County is located along Tennessee's border with the state of Mississippi.

Lincoln County, Tennessee U.S. county in Tennessee

Lincoln County is a county located in the south central part of the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 33,361. Its county seat and largest city is Fayetteville. The county is named for Major General Benjamin Lincoln, an officer in the American Revolutionary War.

Coffee County, Tennessee U.S. county in Tennessee

Coffee County is a county located in the central part of the state of Tennessee, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the county's population was 52,796. Its county seat is Manchester.

Bedford County, Tennessee U.S. county in Tennessee

Bedford County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 45,058. Its county seat is Shelbyville.

Highland County, Ohio U.S. county in Ohio

Highland County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 43,589. Its county seat is Hillsboro. The county is named for the topography which is hilly and divides the watersheds of the Little Miami and Scioto Rivers.

McKinley County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

McKinley County is a county in the northwestern section of the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 71,492. Its county seat is Gallup. The county was created in 1901 and named for President William McKinley.

Burt County, Nebraska U.S. county in Nebraska

Burt County is a county in the U.S. state of Nebraska, bordering the west bank of the upper Missouri River. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 6,858. Its county seat is Tekamah. The county was formed in 1854 and named after Francis Burt, the first governor of Nebraska Territory.

Trigg County, Kentucky U.S. county in Kentucky

Trigg County is a county located on the far southwestern border of the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,339. Its county seat is Cadiz. Formed in 1820, the county was named for Stephen Trigg, an officer in the American Revolutionary War who was killed at the Battle of Blue Licks, now in Robertson County, Kentucky. It was a victory for British and allied troops.

Bourbon County, Kentucky U.S. county in Kentucky

Bourbon County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 19,985. Its county seat is Paris.

Allen County, Kentucky U.S. county in Kentucky

Allen County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 19,956. Its county seat is Scottsville. The county is named for Colonel John Allen, a state senator and soldier who was killed leading the 1st Regiment of Kentucky Rifleman at the Battle of Frenchtown, Michigan during the War of 1812. Allen County practices the prohibition of alcohol and is a completely dry county. It was formed in 1815 from parts of Barren and Warren counties.

Palos Hills, Illinois City in Illinois, United States

Palos Hills is a city in Cook County, Illinois, United States. It is a southwest suburb of Chicago. The city was established in 1958 and had reached a population of 17,484 in the 2010 census. It is the home of Moraine Valley Community College as well as Amos Alonzo Stagg High School.

Sand Lake, Michigan Village in Michigan, United States

Sand Lake is a general law village in Nelson Twp, Kent County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 500 at the 2010 census.

Benoit, Mississippi Town in Mississippi, United States

Benoit is a town in Bolivar County, Mississippi, United States. The population was 477 at the 2010 census, down from 611 in 2000.

Lynchburg, Mississippi Census-designated place in Mississippi, United States

Lynchburg is an unincorporated area and census-designated place (CDP) in DeSoto County, Mississippi, United States. The population was 2,437 at the 2010 census.

Cameron, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Cameron is a town in Moore County, North Carolina in the United States. The population was 285 at the 2010 census.

Lynchburg, Ohio Village in Ohio, United States

Lynchburg is a village in Clinton and Highland counties in the U.S. state of Ohio. The population was 1,499 at the 2010 census.

Petersburg, Tennessee Town in Tennessee, United States

Petersburg is a town in Lincoln and Marshall counties in the U.S. state of Tennessee. The population was 580 at the 2000 census and 544 at the 2010 census.

Lynchburg, Tennessee Consolidated city-county in Tennessee, United States

Lynchburg is a city in the south-central region of the U.S. state of Tennessee. It is governed by a consolidated city-county government unit whose boundaries coincide with those of Moore County. Lynchburg is best known as the location of Jack Daniel's, whose famous Tennessee whiskey is marketed worldwide as the product of a city with only one traffic light. Despite the operational distillery, which is a major tourist attraction, Lynchburg's home county of Moore is a dry county. The population was 6,362 at the 2010 census.

Harrogate, Tennessee City in Tennessee, United States

Harrogate is a city in Claiborne County, Tennessee, United States. It is adjacent to Cumberland Gap National Historical Park.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Megan Dobbs Eades, "Moore County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: 11 March 2013.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved December 6, 2013.
  3. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  4. "Origins Of Tennessee County Names" (PDF). Tennessee Blue Book. 2005–2006. p. 512. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  5. Leland, Suzanne M.; Thurmaier, Kurt (2010). City–County Consolidation: Promises Made, Promises Kept?. Georgetown University Press. p. 180. ISBN   158901622X . Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  6. "Charter of the Lynchburg, Moore County Metropolitan Government" (PDF). University of Tennessee Municipal Technical Advisory Service. Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  7. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  8. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved July 20, 2019.
  9. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  10. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  11. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  12. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  13. Based on 2000 census data
  14. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-12. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  15. Locke, Michelle (January 9, 2013). "Some states unhappy about the idea of happy hours". Yahoo! News. Retrieved 7 April 2014.
  16. "Jack Daniel Distillery," Moore County News. Retrieved: 28 October 2013.
  17. "Board of Education - Moore County Department of Education". www.moorecountyschools.net. Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  18. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-11.

Coordinates: 35°17′N86°22′W / 35.28°N 86.36°W / 35.28; -86.36