High Sheriff of Cumbria

Last updated

The high sheriff is the oldest secular office under the Crown. Formerly the high sheriff was the principal law enforcement officer in the county but over the centuries most of the responsibilities associated with the post have been transferred elsewhere or are now defunct, so that its functions are now largely ceremonial. The high sheriff changes every April.

The position of High Sheriff of Cumbria has existed since the creation of the non-metropolitan and ceremonial county of Cumbria in 1974 which saw the abolition of the former shrievalties of Cumberland and Westmorland. As well as Cumberland and Westmorland Cumbria also includes former parts of Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire.

The non-metropolitan county of Cumbria is to be abolished in April 2023 and replaced with two unitary authorities to be known as Cumberland and Westmorland and Furness. The two new unitary authorities will continue to constitute a ceremonial county named "Cumbria" for the purpose of lieutenancy and shrievalties, being presided over by a Lord Lieutenant of Cumbria and a High Sheriff of Cumbria. [1] [2]

List of high sheriffs

Related Research Articles

Cumbria Ceremonial county of England

Cumbria is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in North West England. The county and Cumbria County Council, its local government, came into existence in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972. Cumbria's county town is Carlisle, in the north of the county. The only other major urban area is Barrow-in-Furness on the south-western tip of the county.

Westmorland Historic county of England

Westmorland is a historic county in north-west England. It formed an administrative county between 1889 and 1974, after which the whole county was administered by the new administrative and ceremonial county of Cumbria. The people of Westmorland are known as Westmerians. In April 2023, it is planned that local government in Cumbria will be reorganised into two unitary authorities, one of which is to be named Westmorland and Furness and would cover most of the historic county along with parts of historic Yorkshire, Lancashire and Cumberland.

Cumberland Historic county of England

Cumberland is a historic county in North West England that had an administrative function from the 12th century until 1974. It is bordered by the historic counties of Northumberland to the northeast, County Durham to the east, Westmorland to the southeast, Lancashire to the south, and the Scottish counties of Dumfriesshire and Roxburghshire to the north. It formed an administrative county from 1889 to 1974 and now forms part of Cumbria. In April 2023 local government in Cumbria will be reorganised into two unitary authorities, one of which is to be named Cumberland and would include most of the historic county, with the exception of Penrith and the surrounding area.

This is a list of those who have held the position of Lord Lieutenant of Cumbria. Cumbria was formed on 1 April 1974 by combining Cumberland and Westmorland and some other areas.

Cumbria County Cricket Club

Cumbria County Cricket Club is one of twenty minor county clubs within the domestic cricket structure of England and Wales. Originally, it represented the historic counties of Cumberland and Westmorland. It now represents the ceremonial county of Cumbria, as defined by the Lieutenancies Act 1997. Cumbria was first created in 1974 as an administrative county by combining the traditional counties of Cumberland and Westmorland along with Furness and a small part of north-west Yorkshire.

Hesket, Cumbria Parish in Cumbria, England

Hesket is a large civil parish in the Eden District of Cumbria, England, on the main A6 between Carlisle and Penrith. At the 2001 census it had a population of 2,363, increasing to 2,588 at the 2011 census, and estimated at 2,774 in 2019. The parish formed in 1894 with the passing of the Local Government Act 1894 and grew to embrace the parish of Plumpton Wall by a County Review Order in 1934. Hesket is part of the historic royal hunting ground of Inglewood Forest. Settlement hereabouts dates back to the Roman occupation.

This is a list of sheriffs and since 1974 high sheriffs of Cambridgeshire.

Westmorland in North West England no longer exists as a county, the original core of it having merged into the modern district of Eden within the county of Cumbria.

The office of High Sheriff of Powys was established in 1974 as part of the creation of the county of Powys in Wales, replacing the shrievalties of the amalgamated counties: High Sheriff of Montgomeryshire, High Sheriff of Radnorshire and High Sheriff of Brecknockshire.

The sheriff is the oldest secular office under the Crown. Formerly the sheriff was the principal law enforcement officer in the county but over the centuries most of the responsibilities associated with the post have been transferred elsewhere or are now defunct so that its functions are now largely ceremonial. The sheriff changes every April.

The High Sheriff of the East Riding of Yorkshire is a current High Sheriff title which has existed since 1996. For around 1,000 years the entire area of Yorkshire was covered by a single High Sheriff of Yorkshire. After the Local Government Act 1972 the title was split to cover several newly created counties. Most of the former area of the East Riding became part of the county of Humberside and under the High Sheriff of Humberside title. Humberside was abolished in 1996 and a High Sheriff title was created for the newly reconstituted East Riding of Yorkshire.

The office of High Sheriff of Dyfed was established in 1974 as part of the creation of the county of Dyfed in Wales following the Local Government Act 1972, and effectively replaced the shrievalties of the amalgamated counties of Cardiganshire, Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire. Since 1996 Dyfed has a purely ceremonial meaning, having been broken up for administrative purposes.

Stagecoach Cumbria & North Lancashire Bus operator

Stagecoach Cumbria & North Lancashire is a major operator of bus services in North West England. It is a subsidiary of the Stagecoach Group, and has its origins in the purchase of Cumberland in 1987 and Ribble in 1988 from the National Bus Company. The head office of Stagecoach Cumbria & North Lancashire is in Carlisle. It was previously known as Stagecoach North West until 1 September 2011, when Stagecoach Merseyside joined Preston and Chorley depots to form Stagecoach Merseyside & South Lancashire.

Cumberland (unitary authority) Proposed Unitary authority area in England

Cumberland is a proposed unitary authority in the ceremonial county of Cumbria, England. It is proposed that the council area will consist of the area covered by the districts of Allerdale, Carlisle and Copeland.

Westmorland and Furness Proposed Unitary authority area in England

Westmorland and Furness is a proposed unitary authority in the ceremonial county of Cumbria, England. It is proposed that the council area will consist of the area covered by the districts of Barrow-in-Furness, Eden and South Lakeland.

References

  1. https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukdsi/2022/9780348231359/article/28 [ bare URL ]
  2. https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukdsi/2022/9780348231359/article/29 [ bare URL ]
  3. "No. 46249". The London Gazette . 28 March 1974. p. 4006.
  4. "No. 46524". The London Gazette. 21 March 1975. p. 3843.
  5. "No. 46857". The London Gazette. 25 March 1976. p. 4337.
  6. "No. 47171". The London Gazette. 11 March 1977. p. 3435.
  7. "No. 47497". The London Gazette. 23 March 1978. p. 3663.
  8. "No. 47795". The London Gazette. 16 March 1979. p. 3547.
  9. "No. 48134". The London Gazette. 21 March 1980. p. 4411.
  10. "No. 48563". The London Gazette. 24 March 1981. p. 4215.
  11. "No. 48919". The London Gazette. 10 March 1982. p. 3495.
  12. "No. 49294". The London Gazette. 16 March 1983. p. 3829.
  13. "No. 49677". The London Gazette. 16 March 1984. p. 3867.
  14. "No. 50071". The London Gazette. 22 March 1985. p. 4108.
  15. "No. 50472". The London Gazette (Supplement). 28 March 1986. p. 4373.
  16. "No. 50865". The London Gazette. 19 March 1987. p. 3691.
  17. "No. 51281". The London Gazette. 23 March 1988. p. 3545.
  18. "No. 51678". The London Gazette. 17 March 1989. p. 3357.
  19. "No. 52081". The London Gazette. 20 March 1990. p. 3677.
  20. "No. 52484". The London Gazette. 25 March 1991. p. 4710.
  21. "No. 52868". The London Gazette. 20 March 1992. p. 5026.
  22. "No. 53247". The London Gazette. 10 March 1993. p. 4679.
  23. "No. 53818". The London Gazette. 18 March 1994. p. 4243.
  24. "No. 53985". The London Gazette. 20 March 1995. p. 4273.
  25. "No. 54345". The London Gazette. 14 March 1996. p. 3831.
  26. "No. 54715". The London Gazette. 25 March 1997. p. 3621.
  27. "No. 55079". The London Gazette. 25 March 1998. p. 3449.
  28. "No. 55428". The London Gazette. 12 March 1999. p. 2937.
  29. "No. 55792". The London Gazette. 16 March 2000. p. 2987.
  30. "No. 56155". The London Gazette. 22 March 2001. p. 3253.
  31. "No. 56531". The London Gazette. 26 March 2002. p. 4283.
  32. "No. 56531". The London Gazette. 26 March 2003. p. 4283.
  33. "No. 56884". The London Gazette. 21 March 2004. p. 3603.
  34. "The News and Star" . Retrieved 24 July 2011.
  35. "No. 57921". The London Gazette. 9 March 2006. p. 3375.
  36. "No. 58266". The London Gazette. 7 March 2007. p. 3313.
  37. "No. 58639". The London Gazette. 13 March 2008. pp. 3947–3948.
  38. "No. 59011". The London Gazette. 19 March 2009. p. 4924.
  39. 1 2 3 4 5 "Cumbria 2014/15". High Sheriffs Association. Retrieved 23 July 2014.
  40. "Cumbria 2015/16". High Sheriffs Association. Retrieved 19 September 2015.
  41. "Cumbria 2016/17". High Sheriffs Association. Retrieved 5 December 2016.
  42. "Cumbria 2017/18". High Sheriffs Association. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  43. "No. 62229". The London Gazette. 15 March 2018. pp. 4814–4814.
  44. "High Sheriff". Cumbria County Council. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  45. "Cumbria 2020/2021". High Sheriffs Association. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  46. "Cumbria". High Sheriffs' Association. Retrieved 29 April 2021.