Jerry Rhome

Last updated
Jerry Rhome
No. 13, 17
Position: Quarterback
Personal information
Born: (1942-03-06) March 6, 1942 (age 79)
Dallas, Texas
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school: Sunset (Dallas, Texas)
College: Tulsa
NFL Draft: 1964  / Round: 13 / Pick: 172
AFL Draft: 1964  / Round: 25 / Pick: 195
(By the New York Jets)
Career history
As a player:
As a coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:71
TD INT:7-14
Yards:1628
QB Rating:55.2
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR
Coaching stats at PFR

Jerry Byron Rhome (born March 6, 1942) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Dallas Cowboys, Cleveland Browns, Houston Oilers and Los Angeles Rams. He closed out his professional career with the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League (CFL). He played college football at the University of Tulsa.

Contents

Early years

Rhome attended Sunset High School in Texas, where he played football for his father. Byron Rhome. He also practiced basketball and baseball.

He accepted a football scholarship from Southern Methodist University. He became a starter at quarterback as a sophomore, registering 74 completions (led the conference) out of 129 attempts (second in the conference) for 693 yards (second in the conference), one touchdown and 6 interceptions. In 1961, he transferred to the University of Tulsa after a 2-7-1 football season, and hence the firing of Head Coach Bill Meek. [1]

In 1963 after sitting out a year, Rhome starred at Tulsa, passing for 1,909 yards, 10 touchdowns, and suffering 13 interceptions. He improved as a senior, with 2,870 passing yards, 32 touchdowns and just 4 interceptions, while leading the nation in total offense (3,128 yards). He finished second in the voting for the Heisman Trophy -- to John Huarte of Notre Dame -- in one of the closest elections ever recorded. [2]

Rhome held a number of NCAA records, including the largest number of touchdowns in a game, in a season, and the most consecutive passes without an interception in a football season and in his career. Rhome also won the Sammy Baugh Trophy in 1964, and had his Number 17 jersey retired by the school.

In 1984, he was inducted into the University of Tulsa Athletic Hall of Fame. In 1988, he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. He also was inducted into the Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame, the Texas High School Hall of Fame, the Inaugural Class of the Dallas Independent School District Athletic Hall of Fame and the Sunset High School Hall of Fame.

Professional career

Dallas Cowboys

Knowing that he had one more year of eligibility, the Dallas Cowboys selected him in the thirteenth round (172nd overall) of the 1964 NFL Draft with a future draft pick, as would the New York Jets in the 25th round (195th overall) of the 1964 AFL Draft. [3]

Rhome began his professional career in 1965 as the third quarterback behind Don Meredith and Craig Morton; he got a chance to start one game that same year against the Cleveland Browns (17-23 loss). [4]

He would serve in a backup role until the start of the 1969 season when Roger Staubach joined the team, and at his request the Cowboys traded Rhome to the Cleveland Browns in exchange for a third round draft choice, later used to select Charlie Waters in the 1970 NFL Draft. [5]

Cleveland Browns

In 1969, although Rhome was a backup to Bill Nelsen, the information he provided about the Cowboys offense helped the Browns beat them in a 38-14 Conference Championship playoff win. [6]

On January 27, 1970, he was traded to the Houston Oilers in exchange for a third round draft choice, that they gave back to the Dallas Cowboys in payment for their original trade. [7]

Houston Oilers

Rhome would only play as a backup for the Houston Oilers for a year. On August 17, 1971, he was waived after the team decided to keep rookies Dan Pastorini and Lynn Dickey, to back up starter Charley Johnson. [8]

Los Angeles Rams

On August 19, 1971, he was claimed off the waiver wire by the Los Angeles Rams, where he was a backup for one year. [9] On August 24, 1972, he was released after the Rams acquired quarterback Pete Beathard. [10]

Montreal Alouettes (CFL)

In October 1972, he signed with the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League. [11] On December 18, he announced his retirement. [12]

Coaching life

After he finished his pro playing career, Rhome became an assistant coach at the University of Tulsa. Next, his first of many NFL coaching jobs was with the Seattle Seahawks. Then while with the Washington Redskins, he earned a Super Bowl championship ring. Rhome is also credited with the signing of future hall of fame wide receiver Steve Largent with the Seattle Seahawks. [13]

See also

Related Research Articles

Steve Largent American football wide receiver and politician

Stephen Michael Largent is an American former professional football player, enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and a former Republican politician, having served in the U.S. House of Representatives for Oklahoma, from 1994 until 2002. Prior to his political career, Largent was a wide receiver for the Seattle Seahawks in the National Football League for his entire 14-season professional football career. He held several all-time receiving records when he retired and is considered one of the greatest wide receivers of all time.

Larry Craig Morton is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL) for 18 seasons, primarily with the Dallas Cowboys and Denver Broncos. He played college football at California, receiving All-American honors, and was selected by the Cowboys fifth overall in the 1965 NFL Draft. Following nine seasons on the Cowboys, a quarterback controversy with Roger Staubach led to Morton joining the New York Giants for three seasons. Morton spent his final six seasons as a member of the Broncos, where he won NFL Comeback Player of the Year and AFC Offensive Player of the Year in 1977. After his 1982 retirement, he became a 1992 inductee of the College Football Hall of Fame. He was also named to the Broncos Ring of Fame in 1988.

Stephen John Walsh is an American football coach and former player. He is a former quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Dallas Cowboys, New Orleans Saints, Chicago Bears, St. Louis Rams, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and Indianapolis Colts. He played college football at the University of Miami.

Anthony Wright (American football) American football quarterback

Anthony Lavon Wright is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Pittsburgh Steelers, Dallas Cowboys, Baltimore Ravens, Cincinnati Bengals and New York Giants. He played college football at the University of South Carolina.

Gary Keith Hogeboom is an American former football quarterback, real estate developer, and television personality. He played in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Indianapolis Colts and Phoenix Cardinals. Hogeboom played college football at Central Michigan University. He was a contestant on the CBS reality TV show Survivor: Guatemala.

Drew Pearson (American football) Pro football wide receiver and sportscaster

Drew Pearson is an American former professional football player, who was a wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL) for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football for the Tulsa Golden Hurricane. He was elected for induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2021.

Jack Concannon American football player, quarterback

John Joseph "Jack" Concannon Jr. was an American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Philadelphia Eagles, Chicago Bears, Dallas Cowboys, Green Bay Packers, and Detroit Lions. He played college football at Boston College.

Paul McDonald (American football)

Paul Brian McDonald is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Cleveland Browns and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the University of Southern California.

Babe Laufenberg

Brandon Hugh 'Babe' Laufenberg is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the New Orleans Saints, San Diego Chargers, Dallas Cowboys, Washington Redskins, and Kansas City Chiefs. He also was a member of the Ohio Glory in the World League of American Football. He played college football at Indiana University.

Charles Wade Wilson was an American football coach and previously a quarterback who played for the Minnesota Vikings, Atlanta Falcons, New Orleans Saints, Dallas Cowboys and the Oakland Raiders in a seventeen-year career from 1981 to 1998 in the National Football League (NFL). He was quarterbacks coach for the Dallas Cowboys from 2000 to 2002 and from 2007 to 2017 and the Chicago Bears from 2004 to 2006. He played college football for East Texas State University, where he was an NAIA All-American Quarterback and led the Lions to the NAIA national semifinals during the 1980 season.

Clifford Lewis Stoudt is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Pittsburgh Steelers, Phoenix Cardinals, Miami Dolphins and Dallas Cowboys. He also was a member of the Birmingham Stallions of the United States Football League. He was drafted in the fifth round by the Steelers. He played college football at Youngstown State University.

Hugh Breedlove Millen is a former professional football quarterback in the National Football League for the Los Angeles Rams, Atlanta Falcons, New England Patriots, Dallas Cowboys and Denver Broncos. He played college football at the University of Washington.

Buddy Humphrey

Loyie Nawlin "Buddy" Humphrey was an American American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Los Angeles Rams, Dallas Cowboys, and St. Louis Cardinals. He also was a member of the Houston Oilers in the American Football League. He played college football at Baylor University and was drafted in the second round of the 1959 NFL Draft.

The Oil Bowl is a high school football all-star game in Wichita Falls, Texas. The game began in 1938, originally between East and West Texas high school football all-stars. In 1945, the game began pitting teams from Oklahoma and Texas, and continued in that format until 2012. In 2013, a dispute concerning the disposition of Oklahoma's share of the game's charitable proceeds led the Oklahoma Coaches Association to withdraw from the game, and the 2013 game matched two Texas teams. For the years in which Texas and Oklahoma teams played, the overall record was 46-19-1 in favor of Texas.

Christopher J. Greisen is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Arizona Cardinals, Washington Redskins and Dallas Cowboys and current coach for West De Pere High School. He was drafted by the Arizona Cardinals in the seventh round of the 1999 NFL Draft. He also was a member of the Rhein Fire, Green Bay Blizzard, Dallas Desperados, Georgia Force, Florida Tuskers, Milwaukee Iron, and Virginia Destroyers. He played college football at Northwest Missouri State.

Craig Marion Kupp is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Phoenix Cardinals and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Pacific Lutheran University.

James Bedford Harris was an American football defensive back in the National Football League (NFL) for the Philadelphia Eagles, Los Angeles Rams, and Dallas Cowboys. He also was a member of the Dallas Texans in the American Football League (AFL). He played college football at the University of Oklahoma.

Garrett Gilbert American football player, quarterback

Garrett Antone Gilbert is an American football quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). Regarded as one of the best high school quarterbacks of his class, he played college football at Texas and SMU and was selected by the St. Louis Rams in the sixth round of the 2014 NFL Draft. He is the son of former NFL quarterback Gale Gilbert.

William Ben Van Burkleo is a former defensive back in the Canadian Football League for the Toronto Argonauts, Winnipeg Blue Bombers, Ottawa Rough Riders, Calgary Stampeders and Hamilton Tiger-Cats. He played college football at the University of Tulsa.

The 1964 Tulsa Golden Hurricane football team represented the University of Tulsa during the 1964 NCAA University Division football season. In their fourth year under head coach Glenn Dobbs, the Golden Hurricane compiled a 9–2 record, 3–1 against Missouri Valley Conference opponents, led the country in scoring with an average of 36.2 points per game, and defeated Ole Miss, 14-7 in the 1964 Bluebonnet Bowl. Under Glenn Dobbs, Tulsa led the nation in passing for five straight years from 1962 to 1966.

References

  1. "Rhome Enters Hall of Fame Former Tulsa Quarterback" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  2. "Notre Dame's Huarte Wins Heisman Award" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  3. "Cowboys Get Jerry Rhome" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  4. "Rhome Gets Starting Role For Cowboys" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  5. "Cowboys' Rhome Sent To Browns" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  6. "Rhome Played Big Part" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  7. "Trade Activity Hot On Pro Draft Day" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  8. "'QB-Rich' Oilers Cut Jerry Rhome" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  9. "Rams Claim Jerry Rhome" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  10. "Rams Put Rhome On Waiver List" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  11. "Goes To Montreal" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  12. "Rhome To Quit Pro Football" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  13. "Largent was the blessed receiver" . Retrieved February 19, 2018.