Korin Japanese Trading Company

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Korin Japanese Trading Company provides expensive kitchen knives from Japan. In addition to their own brand, they sell Masamoto, Misono, Glestain, and Suisin, at prices from under $50 to over $3,000. Founded in 1982 by Sakai, Osaka knife maker Chiharu Sugai and waitress Saori Kawano as a wholesaler to the food service industry, Korin began selling to the public in 2001 and has become popular among celebrity chefs as well as serious cooks and collectors of fine cutlery. [1]

Misono knives are used in the kitchen at the White House, the residence of the President of the United States in Washington, D.C. [2]

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References

  1. "How to Succeed at Knife-Sharpening Without Losing a Thumb" New York Times , September 23, 2006. Accessed September 23, 2006.
  2. Williamson, Elizabeth (February 26, 2011). "Cooking for the Commander in Chief". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved June 22, 2015.