Leon Botstein

Last updated

Botstein, Leon. The History of Listening: How Music Creates Meaning. New York, NY: Basic Books.
  • Botstein, Leon (2013). Von Beethoven zu Berg: Das Gedächtnis der Moderne. Zsolnay.
  • Botstein, Leon (2011). Freud und Wittgenstein Sprache und menschliche Natur. Vienna: Picus Verlag.
  • Botstein, Leon (2004). Vienna: Jews and the City of Music. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. ISBN   978-1931493277.
  • Botstein, Leon (1999). The Complete Brahms: A Guide to the Musical Works of Johannes. New York, NY.
  • Botstein, Leon (1997). Jefferson's Children: Education and the Promise of American Culture. New York, NY: Doubleday. ISBN   0-385-47555-1.
  • Botstein, Leon (1991). Judentum und Modernität : Essays zur Rolle der Juden in der deutschen und österreichischen Kultur, 1848 bis 1938. Vienna: Böhlau. ISBN   3-205-05358-3.
  • Selected articles, essays, and chapters

    • (2020) Botstein, Leon (2020). "Traditionalism". In Kristiansen, Morten (ed.). Strauss in Context. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   9781108379939.
    • (2020) Botstein, Leon (2020). "The Eroica in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries". In November, Nancy (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to the Eroica Symphony. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   978-1108422581.
    • (2020) Botstein, Leon (2020). "The Philosophical Composer: The Influence of Moses Mendelssohn and Friedrich Schleiermacher on Felix Mendelssohn". In Taylor, Benedict (ed.). Rethinking Mendelssohn. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. ISBN   9780190611781.
    • (2018) Botstein, L. (2018). "Redeeming the Liberal Arts". Liberal Education. 104 (4): 1–5. doi: 10.1515/9780691202006-018 .
    • (2017) "Hungary's xenophobic attack on Central European University is a threat to freedom everywhere". Washington Post. April 4, 2017. [72]
    • (2017) "American Universities Must Take a Stand". New York Times. February 8, 2017. [73]
    • (2016) "Bard president draws parallels between European anti-Semitism and American racism to explain Trump's win". Washington Post. December 16, 2016. [74]
    • (2016) "The Election Was About Racism Against Barack Obama". TIME. December 13, 2016. [75]
    • (2016) "Why the Next President Should Forgive All Student Loans". TIME. August 12, 2016. [76]
    • (2016) Botstein, Leon (August 9, 2016). "Walther Rathenau (1867-1922): Bildung, Prescription, Prophecy". In Picard, Jacques (ed.). Makers of Jewish Modernity: Thinkers, Artists, Leaders, and the World They Made. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. ISBN   9780691164236.
    • (2015) "Can Music Speak Truth to Power?". Musical America. August 12, 2015. [77]
    • (2014) "The SAT is Part Hoax, Part Fraud". TIME. Vol. 183, no. 11. March 24, 2014. p. 17.
    • (2014) "How an Anti-Semitic Composer Created 'Kol Nidre' and 'Moses'". The Jewish Daily Forward. March 24, 2014. [78]
    • (2014) "Book Review: 'Mad Music' by Stephen Budiansky & 'Charles Ives in the Mirror' by David C. Paul". The Wall Street Journal. August 1, 2014. [79]
    • (2013) "Resisting Complacency, Fear, and the Philistine: The University and its Challenges". The Hedgehog Review. June 1, 2013. [80]
    • (2011) Botstein, Leon (September 29, 2011). "The Eye of the Needle: Music as History after the Age of Recording". In Fulcher, Jane (ed.). The Oxford Handbook to the New Cultural History of Music. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 256–304. ISBN   978-0-19-534186-7.
    • (2010) "The High School Sinkhole". New York Times. February 10, 2010.
    • (2010) "Why Mahler?". Wall Street Journal. October 9, 2010.
    • (2009) "For the Love of Learning". The New Republic. March 2, 2009.
    • (2009) "Recovery Depends on School Reform". New York Times. February 2, 2009.
    • (2008) "The Unsung Success of Live Classical Music". Wall Street Journal. October 3, 2008.
    • (2007) Botstein, Leon (March 24, 2007). "Freud and Wittgenstein: Language and human nature". Psychoanalytic Psychology. 24 (4): 603–622. doi:10.1037/0736-9735.24.4.603.
    • (2006) "Memories of beginnings past". The Jerusalem Post. September 21, 2006.
    • (2006) "Milton Babbitt: Speaking Truth Through Music". The Chronicle of Higher Education. April 14, 2006.
    • (2005) Botstein, Leon (2005). "Music, Femininity, and Jewish Identity: The Tradition and Legacy of the Salon". In Bilski, Emily (ed.). Jewish Women and Their Salons: The Power of Conversation. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. ISBN   9780300103854.
    • (2004) Botstein, Leon (2004). "Being Jewish". In Pearl, Judea and Ruth (ed.). I Am Jewish: Personal Reflections Inspired by the Last Words of Daniel Pearl. Woodstock, VT: Jewish Lights Publishing. ISBN   9781580232593.
    • (2003) Botstein, Leon (2003). "The Future of Conducting". In Bowen, José (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Conducting. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   978-0521527910.
    • (2003) "The Merit Myth". The New York Times. January 14, 2003. [81]
    • (2001) Botstein, Leon (2001). "Neoclassicism, Romanticism, and Emancipation: The Origins of Felix Mendelssohn's Aesthetic Outlook". In Seaton, Douglas (ed.). The Mendelssohn Companion. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. ISBN   978-0313284458.
    • (2001) "We Waste Our Children's Time". The New York Times. January 24, 2001. [82]
    • (2000) "What Local Control?". The New York Times. September 19, 2000. [83]
    • (2000) Botstein, Leon (2000). "Sound and Structure in Beethoven's Orchestral Music". In Glenn, Stanley (ed.). The Cambridge Companion to Beethoven. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN   978-1139002202.

    Selected recordings

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    References

    1. Profile: Leon Botstein, Hadassah Magazine, "Botstein is a proud secular Jew not ambivalent or defensive about his identity. In I Am Jewish: Personal Reflections Inspired by the Last Words of Daniel Pearl (Jewish Lights), he writes: "In Judaism, learning is prayer, for it celebrates the human capacity for language and thought." He waxes nostalgic for the days of "exceptional Jewry," arguing that "Jews have entered the indistinguishable middle class…. We are no longer the people of the book; we are a people of ordinary vulgarity. The real tragedy of American Jewry—and Israel—is that we've used privilege to become absolutely ordinary.""
    2. 1 2 3 4 Depalma, Anthony (October 4, 1992). "The Most Happy College President: Leon Botstein of Bard". The New York Times. Retrieved February 22, 2021.
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    4. Abel, Olivia (July 6, 2011). "Interview with Leon Botstein: 35 Years (and Counting) as President of Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY" . Retrieved February 22, 2021.
    5. Elliott, Susan. "Orchestrating a career: College president, conductor, and writer: for Leon Botstein, work is a three-part harmony". University of Chicago Magazine. Retrieved February 22, 2021.
    6. Gregory, Alice (September 22, 2014). "The Duke of Bard". The New Yorker. ISSN   0028-792X . Retrieved December 25, 2017.
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    11. Gregory, Alice (September 22, 2014). "The Duke of Bard". The New Yorker. ISSN   0028-792X . Retrieved December 25, 2017.
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    15. Wilson, Robin (October 10, 1997). "In a 22-Year Career, Bard's President Radically Transforms College's Mission". The Chronicle of High Education. Retrieved February 22, 2021.
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    17. Elliott, Susan. "Orchestrating a career: College president, conductor, and writer: for Leon Botstein, work is a three-part harmony". University of Chicago Magazine. Retrieved February 22, 2021.
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    73. Botstein, Leon (February 8, 2017). "American Universities Must Take a Stand". The New York Times. Retrieved February 8, 2017.
    74. Ross, Janell. "Bard president draws parallels between European anti-Semitism and American racism to explain Trump's win". washingtonpost.com. Retrieved December 16, 2016.
    75. Botstein, Leon. "The Election Was About Racism Against Barack Obama". time.com. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
    76. Botstein, Leon (August 12, 2016). "Why the Next President Should Forgive All Student Loans". Money.com . Archived from the original on August 18, 2020.
    77. Botstein, Leon. "Can Music Speak Truth to Power?". musicalamerica.com.
    78. Leon Botstein (March 24, 2014). "How an Anti-Semitic Composer Created 'Kol Nidre' and 'Moses'". The Forward.
    79. Leon Botstein (August 1, 2014). "Book Review: 'Mad Music' by Stephen Budiansky & 'Charles Ives in the Mirror' by David C. Paul". The Wall Street Journal.
    80. Leon Botstein (June 1, 2013). "Resisting Complacency, Fear, and the Philistine: The University and its Challenges". The Hedgehog Review.
    81. Leon Botstein (January 14, 2003). "The Merit Myth". The New York Times.
    82. Leon Botstein (January 24, 2001). "We Waste Our Children's Time". The New York Times.
    83. Leon Botstein (September 19, 2000). "What Local Control?". The New York Times.
    Leon Botstein
    Leon Botstein conducting.jpg
    President of Bard College
    Assumed office
    1975