List of Metallica concert tours

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Metallica performing in Sweden for the World Magnetic Tour in 2009 Metallica, Sonisphere Sweden 2009, 1.jpg
Metallica performing in Sweden for the World Magnetic Tour in 2009

Metallica is an American heavy metal band, founded in 1981 by drummer Lars Ulrich and rhythm guitarist James Hetfield. Aside from Ulrich, the original lineup for some of the 1982 concerts included James Hetfield (rhythm guitar and lead vocals), Dave Mustaine (lead guitar and backing vocals) and Ron McGovney (bass guitar). Cliff Burton replaced McGovney in 1982 and played with the band until his death in 1986. After his death, bassists Jason Newsted (1986–2001), and Robert Trujillo (since 2003) [1] [2] were recruited in the band. While the lead guitarist role was taken by Kirk Hammett (since 1983) after Dave Mustaine got fired from the band. During the first years Metallica played in small festivals and as supporting acts on tours for bands such as Venom. [3] Since their very first live gig at Radio City, Anaheim on March 14, 1982, Metallica has performed on all populated continents numbering live events every year (with the exception of 2001) in a total of over 1,600 shows. The majority of these were played in the United States, but numerous concerts were also played in Canada, the United Kingdom, and Germany, among other countries. The band also went on seven worldwide tours: Damage, Inc. Tour (1986–1987), Damaged Justice (1988–1989), Wherever We May Roam Tour (1991–1992), Nowhere Else to Roam (1993), Madly in Anger with the World Tour (2003–2004), Escape from the Studio '06, and World Magnetic Tour (2008–2010). During these tours, South Africa as well as several countries in Central and South America, Asia, and Oceania were visited.

Metallica American heavy metal band

Metallica is an American heavy metal band. The band was formed in 1981 in Los Angeles by vocalist/guitarist James Hetfield and drummer Lars Ulrich, and has been based in San Francisco for most of its career. The group's fast tempos, instrumentals and aggressive musicianship made them one of the founding "big four" bands of thrash metal, alongside Megadeth, Anthrax and Slayer. Metallica's current lineup comprises founding members and primary songwriters Hetfield and Ulrich, longtime lead guitarist Kirk Hammett and bassist Robert Trujillo. Guitarist Dave Mustaine and bassists Ron McGovney, Cliff Burton and Jason Newsted are former members of the band.

Heavy metal is a genre of rock music that developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, largely in the United Kingdom. With roots in blues rock, psychedelic rock, and acid rock, the bands that created heavy metal developed a thick, massive sound, characterized by highly amplified distortion, extended guitar solos, emphatic beats, and overall loudness. The genre's lyrics and performance styles are sometimes associated with aggression and machismo.

Lars Ulrich Danish musician

Lars Ulrich is a Danish musician, songwriter, record producer and podcaster. He is best known as the drummer and co-founder of the American heavy metal band Metallica. The son of tennis player Torben Ulrich and grandson of tennis player Einer Ulrich, he also played tennis in his youth and moved to Los Angeles at age 16 to train professionally. However, rather than playing tennis, Ulrich began playing drums. After publishing an advertisement in The Recycler, Ulrich met vocalist/guitarist James Hetfield and formed Metallica. Along with Hetfield, Ulrich has songwriting credits on all of the band's songs. He was the face of the band during the Napster controversy. Later in his career Ulrich began hosting the It's Electric podcast, in which he speaks with other prominent musicians.

Contents

Metallica has played many shows at major rock festivals such as Woodstock '94, Ozzfest, Monsters of Rock, Lollapalooza, Download Festival, Reading Festival, and Days on the Green. They also held numerous concerts in stadiums, some of which featured crowds of over 100,000 people. One of the highest-attendance music concerts in history was held by Metallica on September 28, 1991 at Tushino Airfield in Moscow, where unofficially 1.6 million people attended. Some of these performances were later released as videos for special box set or DVD releases. Some performances have been held in theaters, including two April 1999 shows alongside the San Francisco Symphony that were released as the album S&M . [4]

Rock festival Type of music festival

A rock festival is a large-scale rock music concert, featuring multiple acts performing an often diverse range of rock music including heavy metal, alternative, folk, and related genres.

Woodstock 94 music festival

Woodstock '94 was an American music festival held in 1994 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the original Woodstock festival of 1969. It was promoted as "2 More Days of Peace and Music". The poster used to promote the first concert was revised to feature two doves perched on the neck of an electric guitar, instead of the original acoustic one.

Ozzfest is an annual festival tour of the United States and sometimes Europe featuring performances by many heavy metal and hard rock musical groups. It was founded by Ozzy Osbourne and his wife Sharon Osbourne, both of whom also organise each yearly tour with their son Jack Osbourne. The Ozzfest tour has featured bands of a variety of genres within heavy metal and hard rock, including alternative metal, thrash metal, industrial metal, metalcore, hardcore punk, deathcore, nu metal, death metal, post-hardcore, gothic metal and black metal. Ozzy Osbourne and Black Sabbath have played the tour several times over the years.

Metallica's first official tour was Kill 'Em All for One, which started in 1983 to promote their debut album. Their longest so far have been the Wherever We May Roam and World Magnetic Tours, which lasted 14 months and 20 months, respectively, with each having over 170 concerts. [5] The band is among the most lucrative live bands, selling out half of their first 187 concerts held during the 2000s, and gaining an attendance of over 3.5 million people and a gross of over US$227 million. [6]

<i>Kill Em All</i> 1983 studio album by Metallica

Kill 'Em All is the debut studio album by the American heavy metal band Metallica, released on July 25, 1983, by the independent record label Megaforce Records. Kill 'Em All is regarded as a groundbreaking album for thrash metal because of its precise musicianship, which fuses new wave of British heavy metal riffs with hardcore punk tempos. The album's musical approach and lyrics were markedly different from rock's mainstream of the early 1980s and inspired a number of bands who followed in similar manner. The album did not enter the Billboard 200 until 1986, when it peaked at number 155, following Metallica's commercial success with its third studio album Master of Puppets; the 1988 Elektra reissue peaked at number 120. Kill 'Em All was critically praised at the time of its release and in retrospect, and was placed on a few publications' best album lists. It was certified 3× Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) in 1999 for shipping three million copies in the United States. The album generated two singles, "Whiplash" and "Jump in the Fire".

1980s tours

Year(s)TitleLegs (locations) and datesNumber of
shows
[note 1]
Supporting acts [note 2]
1983–1984 Kill 'Em All for One US: July 27, 1983 – January 22, 198452 Raven, Anthrax, Exodus [3] [7]

This was the first tour played as a band, and it supported their first album, Kill 'Em All . [7]

1984Seven Dates of HellEurope: February 3 – August 29, 198416 Venom (headliner), Twisted Sister [3] [8]

Metallica played as supporting act for Venom, performing in front of 7,000 people at the Aardschok Festival in Zwolle, Netherlands. [9]

1984Bang That Head That Doesn't BangEurope: November 16 – December 20, 198425 Tank [10]

The band had its first major European tour, with an average crowd of 1,300. [10]

1985 Ride the Lightning Tour North America: January 11 – March 19, 1985
Europe: August 13 – September 14, 1985
US: September 29, 1985 – December 31, 1985
57 WASP (co-headliner), Armored Saint, Tank, ZZ Top, Marillion, Bon Jovi, Ratt, Magnum, Tommy Vance, Exodus [10] [11]

The band went on tour to support their second album, Ride the Lightning , gaining an attendance of 60,000 at a show in Oakland, California, at the Day on the Green festival. [10] During the tour, Metallica played for the first time at the Monsters of Rock festival. The concert was at Donington Park, England, in front of 70,000 people. [10]

1986–1987 Damage, Inc. Tour North America: March 27 – August 3, 1986
Europe: September 10–26, 1986
Japan: November 15–20, 1986
North America: November 26 – December 20, 1986
Europe: January 8 – February 13, 1987
142 Anthrax, Metal Church

The tour supported the band's third album Master of Puppets in which the headliner of the North American spring and summer portion was Ozzy Osbourne. [10] It was plagued with misfortune for the band, as the guitar technician John Marshall had to fill James Hetfield's place at the rhythm guitar twice due to wrist injury. [12] [13] Later, during the European portion, a bus accident in Sweden killed bassist Cliff Burton. [12] The World Tour that followed introduced the new bassist, Jason Newsted. [13]

1987 Monsters of Rock '87 Europe: August 20–30, 19874 Bon Jovi, Dio, Anthrax, WASP, Cinderella [11] [14]

The group went on the festival tour for the second time, with concerts in England and West Germany. [15]

1988 Monsters of Rock '88 US: May 27 – July 30, 198832 Van Halen (headliner), Scorpions, Dokken, Living Colour, Kingdom Come [16]

Metallica went on the same festival tour, the second year in a row, and played in front of crowds numbering 40,000 to 53,000 people. [17] [18]

1988–1989 Damaged Justice Europe: September 11 – November 5, 1988
North America: November 15, 1988 – April 21, 1989
Pacific Rim: May 1–27, 1989
North America: May 31 – September 23, 1989
South America: October 4–7, 1989
222 Danzig, Queensrÿche, Faith No More, Mortal Sin, The Cult [19] [20] [21]

The tour supported the band's fourth album, ...And Justice for All . [22] The August 29 and 30, 1989 shows in Seattle were later released in the box set Live Shit: Binge & Purge . [23]

1990s tours

Year(s)TitleLegs (locations) and datesNumber of
shows
[note 3]
Supporting acts [note 2]
1990Tour 1990Europe, North America: May 11 – September 11, 199012 Warrior Soul, Dio, Bonham, Aerosmith (headliner) [24] [25]

The tour consisted of several European festivals and stadium shows, as well as a private gig at The Marquee under the name The Frayed Ends. [26] It included two shows in Aerosmith's Pump Tour, along with The Black Crowes and Warrant, with crowds of 60,000 and 30,000 spectators respectively. [25] [27]

1991Monsters of Rock '91Europe: August 10 – September 28, 199119 AC/DC (headliner), Pantera, Mötley Crüe, Queensrÿche, The Black Crowes [11]

Metallica went on the festival tour a fourth time. The last concert of the tour, held on September 28 at Tushino Airfield in Moscow, was described as "the first free outdoor Western rock concert in Soviet history" and had a crowd estimated between 500,000 and 3,500,000 people, [28] [29] with some unofficial estimates as high over 2,000,000. [30]

1991–1992 Wherever We May Roam Tour North America: October 12, 1991 – July 5, 1992
Europe: October 22 – December 18, 1992
174 Metal Church - Opened: June 19 – July 5, 1992

The tour supported the fifth album, Metallica (also known as "The Black Album") which included a performance at the Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, with the band performing a short set list and Hetfield performing with Queen and Tony Iommi. The January 13 and 14, 1992 shows in San Diego were later released in the box set Live Shit: Binge & Purge , [23] while the tour and the album were later documented in A Year and a Half in the Life of Metallica . [31]

1992 Guns N' Roses/Metallica Stadium Tour North America: July 17 – October 6, 199225 Guns N' Roses (co-headliner), Faith No More, Motörhead [32] [33] [34]

It was an overlap of Metallica's Wherever We May Roam Tour and Guns N' Roses' Use Your Illusion Tour. James Hetfield suffered serious burns during a show in Montreal; John Marshall filled the guitar for the rest of the tour. [32]

1993 Nowhere Else to Roam North America: January 22 – March 13, 1993
World Tour: March 16 – May 8, 1993
Europe: May 19 – July 4, 1993
77 Suicidal Tendencies, The Cult, Alice in Chains, Kyuss [35] [36]

The shows in Mexico City across February and March 1993 were later released as part of the box set Live Shit: Binge & Purge . [37] It is also the first time the band met Robert Trujillo who would join the band almost a decade later. [35]

1994 Shit Hits the Sheds Tour US: May 28 – August 21, 199451 Danzig, Suicidal Tendencies, Candlebox, Fight [35]

The tour included a performance at Woodstock '94 on August 13 in front of a crowd of 350,000. [38] [39]

1995Escape from the Studio '95UK, Canada, US: August 23 – December 14, 19955 Slayer, Skid Row, Slash's Snakepit, Therapy?, Warrior Soul, Machine Head, White Zombie, Corrosion of Conformity [11]

During the tour, a song from each of the next two albums were played ("2 × 4" and "Devil's Dance"). [40] At the Donington Park concert, Metallica joined the Monsters of Rock for a fifth time. [11] It was the first tour with most of songs in Eb Tuning still used today

1996 Lollapalooza No. 6 North America: June 4 – August 4, 199628 Soundgarden, Cocteau Twins, Devo, Ramones, Rancid, Screaming Trees, Psychotica [41] [42]

Metallica headlined the festival tour, in front of crowds of about 20,000, [43] [44] with many shows being sold out. [45]

1996–1997 Poor Touring Me Europe: September 6 – November 27, 1996
North America: December 19, 1996 – May 28, 1997
139 Corrosion of Conformity, Soundgarden, Korn [46] [47] [48]

The tour supported the recently released album Load . [49] The May 9 and 10, 1997 shows in Fort Worth, Texas were later released in the video Cunning Stunts . [50]

1997Blitzkrieg '97Europe: August 22–24, 19973

Metallica plays at European festivals to fulfill earlier contractual obligations. They play three back-to-back shows at the Pukkelpop Festival in Belgium, [51] Blind Man's Ball in Germany, [52] and Reading Festival in England. [53]

1997Re-Load Promo TourUS, Europe: November 11–18, 19976

The tour promoted the just-released album ReLoad . [49] Over 120,000 fans called to request a location for the free concert held in November, later named Million Decibel March. [54]

1998–1999 Poor Re-Touring Me Tour Pacific Rim: March 21 – May 8, 1998
North America: June 24, 1998 – April 30, 1999
65

Jerry Cantrell, Days of the New [55]

The shows on April 21 and 22, 1999 at Berkeley Community Theatre, alongside the San Francisco Symphony, were released as the album S&M . [4]

1998Garage Inc Promo TourNorth America: November 17–24, 19985 [49]

The tour supported the album Garage Inc. [56] [57]

1999 Garage Remains the Same Tour Mexico, South America: April 30 – May 14, 1999
Europe, US: May 21 – December 8, 1999
53 Monster Magnet [58]

The tour supported the album Garage Inc. [59] During the tour, Metallica played two live concerts similar to the one released in S&M , one in Germany with Babelsberger Filmorchester on November 19; and one at the Madison Square Garden, New York City, with the Orchestra of St. Luke's on November 23. [4]

1999–2000 M2K Mini Tour US: December 28, 1999 – January 10, 200010 Ted Nugent, Sevendust, Kid Rock, Black Sabbath, Creed [4] [60]

The New Year's Eve show in Pontiac, Michigan was in front of 50,000 people. [61]

2000s tours

Year(s)TitleLegs (locations) and datesNumber of
shows
[note 4]
Supporting acts [note 2]
2000 Summer Sanitarium Tour US: June 23 – August 9, 200021 Korn, Kid Rock, Powerman 5000, System of a Down [62] [63]

Hetfield missed three shows due to back injury. [64] Newsted sang most of the songs during these concerts, and the vocals and rhythm guitar were also taken by musicians from the other bands. [65] [66]

2003 Summer Sanitarium 2003 Tour Europe: June 4–28, 2003
Europe, North America: July 4 – August 29, 2003
36 Limp Bizkit, Deftones, Mudvayne, Linkin Park, Lostprophets, The Darkness [67]

As a tour supporting album St. Anger , it marked the first time the new bassist, Robert Trujillo, played live with the band. [68]

2003–2004 Madly in Anger with the World Tour World Tour: November 6, 2003 – November 28, 2004137 Godsmack, Lostprophets, Slipknot, In Flames [69]

Another tour supporting album St. Anger , in which most shows were made available later for purchase as a digital download. [70] Before the show in Download Festival, Lars Ulrich was hospitalized, and Metallica played in that gig with guest drummers Dave Lombardo and Joey Jordison, and Ulrich's drum technician Flemming Larsen. [71]

2006 Escape from the Studio '06 World Tour: March 13 – August 15, 200616 Avenged Sevenfold, Bullet for My Valentine, Trivium, Tool [72]

Two untitled new songs were played, and some portions ended up being featured on the next released album. [73] Tour also featured the album Master of Puppets played in its entirety in its proper sequence for the first time. [74]

2007 Sick of the Studio '07 Europe: June 28 – July 18, 200714 Mastodon, Him, Joe Satriani, Stone Sour, Incubus, Faithless, Interpol, The Kooks, My Dying Bride, Heaven and Hell, Oomph!, Machine Head, Turbonegro, Volbeat, Mnemic, Diablo [75]

The tour featured shows at festivals and in stadiums, with crowds numbering 60,000 people. [76] [77]

2008 2008 European Vacation Tour North America, Europe: May 14 – August 24, 200826 The Sword, Ozzy Osbourne, Serj Tankian, Hellyeah, Jonathan Davis, Cavalera conspiracy, Shadows Fall, Apocalyptica, In This Moment [78]

Two songs from the upcoming album were debuted. [79] The band played at Ozzfest for the first time in their history, being featured as headliners and playing right after Ozzy Osbourne. [78] [80]

2008–2010 [5] World Magnetic Tour Europe, Israel: September 12, 2008 – June 27, 2010
US, Canada: October 17, 2008 – December 12, 2009
Latin America: June 4, 2009 – March 14, 2010
Australia, Japan, New Zealand: September 15, 2010 – November 21, 2010
187 Lamb of God, The Sword, Volbeat, Machine Head, Down, Mastodon, Baroness, Avenged Sevenfold, Resorte, Mass Hysteria, Alice in Chains, Glyder, Fear Factory, Gojira, Horcas, Mad, Hibria, Sepultura, High on Fire, Orphaned Land, Criminal

Tour supporting the album Death Magnetic . The tour was the 16th highest-grossing concert tour ever. The shows on June 4, 6 and 7 at Mexico City, on July 7, 2009 at Nîmes, France and on October 31 and November 1 at Quebec City were released on the DVDs Orgullo, Pasión y Gloria: Tres Noches en la Ciudad de México , Français Pour Une Nuit and Quebec Magnetic respectively. [81] [82] The tour ended with concerts in Australia and in New Zealand in November 2010. [83]

2010s tours

Year(s)TitleLegs (locations) and datesNumber of
shows
[note 5]
Supporting acts [note 2]
20112011 Vacation TourNorth America, Europe, South America, Asia: April 23 – October 30, 201117 Slayer, Megadeth, Anthrax, Biffy Clyro

Tour features the first two Big Four U.S. shows in Indio, California [84] and New York City, [85] [86] respectively, as well as the band's first ever show in India. [87] [88]

2012 2012 European Black Album Tour Europe: May 7 – June 10, 201216 Gojira, Machine Head, The Kills, Soundgarden, Channel Zero, Mastodon, Ghost

Tour headlining European festivals, such as Sonisphere Festival, Download Festival, Nova Rock Festival, Rock in Rio Lisboa, Werchter Boutique, Rock am Ring and Rock im Park. As a late celebration for The Black Album's 20th anniversary, it was played in its enterity in reverse. [89]

2012 The Full Arsenal Tour North America: July 28 – August 29, 201213 Jim Breuer

Few of the shows were recorded for the band's movie Metallica: Through the Never , was the first tour that the band had two songs for the encore rather than three, and included stage antics like the stage falling apart, the Death Magnetic Coffins, and much more.

2013Summer Tour 2013North America, Asia, Europe, South America, Antarctica: June 8 – September 21, 201314 Anvil

At the second Orion Music + More festival held in Detroit, the band played under the fake-name "Dehaan" - "Dehaan" being a reference to actor Dane DeHaan, who starred in Metallica: Through the Never - and played Kill 'Em All in its entirety, celebrating the 30th anniversary of the release. [90] Following the tour, Metallica played a show called "Freeze 'Em All" in Antarctica's Carlini Base, becoming the first band to play on all seven continents. [91]

2014 By Request Tour Europe, South America and Montreal in North America: March 16, 2014 – August 9, 201426 De La Tierra, Raven, Slayer, Mastodon, Ghost, Gojira, Avenged Sevenfold, Alter Bridge, In Extremo, Biffy Clyro, Rob Zombie, Jack White, Robert Plant, Alice in Chains, Volbeat, Placebo, Skrillex, Airbourne, Children of Bodom, Kvelertak, Anthrax, Dropkick Murphys, Apocalyptica

An interactive tour, concertgoers could vote, via internet, which songs Metallica would include on each night's setlist and, at the concert, via SMS, to a song in the encore. Metallica debuted a new song, called "Lords of Summer". Metallica's only stop in North America was in Montreal for the Heavy Montreal festival.

2015 Lords of Summer Tour North America, South America and Europe: May 9, 2015 – September 19, 201516 Linkin Park, Faith No More, Tame Impala, Meshuggah, Bring Me the Horizon, Gojira, Baroness, Mötley Crüe
Back-to-back gigs in Quebec City marked both the last concert held at Colisée Pepsi and the first musical performance held at Centre Videotron. [92]
2016–2019 WorldWired Tour North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Oceania : September 27, 2016 – October 26, 2019170 Cage the Elephant, Babymetal, Lang Lang, Hatesphere, Iggy Pop, Avenged Sevenfold, Volbeat, Gojira, Kvelertak, Jim Breuer, Ghost, Bokassa, Slipknot

An ongoing tour in support of their new album, Hardwired... to Self-Destruct .

First and other performance

Year(s)Locations and datesNumber of
shows
Supporting acts
1982–1983US: March 14, 1982 – May 7, 198336

First gig was at Radio City, Anaheim on March 14, 1982, other gigs during 1982 and early 1983 as a band were not played as a tour, as the new band released several demos and went through a couple of line-up changes, as Dave Mustaine lead guitarist and backing vocalist was replaced by Kirk Hammett, and Ron McGovney was replaced by Cliff Burton as bassist. [1] [2]

2000–2003California/England: November 30, 2000 – June 1, 200310

Without a bass player, the band played few shows as they auditioned for a bassist. [93] The year 2001 was the first since the band's formation when Metallica played no shows at all. [94] During their only performance of 2002, the band introduced themselves as Bob's Band (after Bob Rock who helped on bass). [93]

2005Rolling Stones Gigs 20052 The Rolling Stones (headliner), Everclear [95]

The band interrupted its vacation after being invited to open two shows for The Rolling Stones' A Bigger Bang Tour in San Francisco, California. [96]

2017Band Together Bay Area1 Rancid, Dave Matthews, Raphael Saadiq, Dead & Company, G-Eazy
Metallica played this charity concert to raise money for the North Bay fires.

Notes

  1. Complete list of shows for 1982 Archived 2010-01-31 at the Wayback Machine , 1983 Archived 2010-02-24 at the Wayback Machine , 1984 Archived 2008-10-12 at the Wayback Machine , 1985 Archived 2010-01-26 at the Wayback Machine , 1986 Archived 2010-03-02 at the Wayback Machine , 1987 Archived 2016-03-19 at the Wayback Machine , 1988 Archived 2008-08-08 at the Wayback Machine , and 1989 Archived 2010-03-29 at the Wayback Machine are listed on the Metallica.com website. Retrieved January 1, 2011.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Most of the supporting acts listed here joined Metallica only for a part of the whole tour.
  3. Complete list of shows for 1990 Archived 2010-02-04 at the Wayback Machine , 1991 Archived 2010-01-30 at the Wayback Machine , 1992 Archived 2010-02-06 at the Wayback Machine , 1993 Archived 2016-08-19 at the Wayback Machine , 1994 Archived 2016-08-19 at the Wayback Machine , 1995 Archived 2016-08-19 at the Wayback Machine , 1996 , 1997 Archived 2016-08-19 at the Wayback Machine , 1998 Archived 2016-08-19 at the Wayback Machine , and 1999 Archived 2016-08-19 at the Wayback Machine are listed on the Metallica.com website. Retrieved January 1, 2011.
  4. Complete list of shows for 2000, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, and 2010 are listed on the Metallica.com website. Retrieved January 1, 2011.
  5. Complete list of shows for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015 are listed on the Metallica.com website. Retrieved January 1, 2011.

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Sum 41 discography discography

This is the complete discography of the Canadian rock band Sum 41. The band has seven full-length studio albums, three live albums, 26 music videos, one compilation, four EPs, nine B-sides, and 23 singles.

The Summer Sanitarium Tour was a music event led by American heavy metal band, Metallica. The first edition took place during the summer of 2000, with 20 shows in the United States. A second edition was held during the summer of 2003, with 21 shows in North America. The tour was sponsored by MTV and Mars Music and promoted by SFX Concerts.

<i>Death Magnetic</i> 2008 studio album by Metallica

Death Magnetic is the ninth studio album by American heavy metal band Metallica, released on September 12, 2008 through Warner Bros. Records. The album was produced by Rick Rubin, marking the band's first album since ...And Justice for All (1988) not to be produced by longtime collaborator Bob Rock. It is also the first Metallica album to feature bassist Robert Trujillo, and the second to be completely co-written by all of the band's members.

The following is a list of events that affected American television in 2010, a year marked by the usual debuts, cancellations, and continuations of shows; the launches, closures, or rebrandings of channels; but also significant cable/satellite carriage disputes.

References

General

Specific

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