List of Olympic venues in luge

Last updated
Luge pictogram.svg
The combination track of the Mt. Van Hoevenberg Olympic Bobsled Run at Lake Placid in 2005. For the 1980 Winter Olympics, the luge track was located there. File BobsleighrunLP.JPG
The combination track of the Mt. Van Hoevenberg Olympic Bobsled Run at Lake Placid in 2005. For the 1980 Winter Olympics, the luge track was located there.
Men's tower start house at the Canada Olympic Park bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton track in 2006. The men's singles luge event started here during the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary. Canada Olympic Park 2006 Dec 9 - 16.jpg
Men's tower start house at the Canada Olympic Park bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton track in 2006. The men's singles luge event started here during the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary.

For the Winter Olympics, there are 14 venues that have been or will be used for luge. Initially separate from bobsleigh, the sports were first combined in 1976. Luge was combined with bobsleigh finally in 1984 and then with skeleton in 2002.

Luge at the Winter Olympics

Luge is a winter sport featured at the Winter Olympic Games where a competitor or two-person team rides a flat sled while lying supine and feet first. The sport is usually contested on a specially designed ice track that allows gravity to increase the sled's speed. The winner normally completes the route with the fastest overall time. It was first contested at the 1964 Winter Olympics, with both men's and women's events and a doubles event. Doubles is technically considered an open event since 1994, but only men have competed in it. German lugers have dominated the competition, winning 81 medals of 141 possible.

Bobsleigh at the Winter Olympics

Bobsleigh is an event in the Winter Olympic Games where a two- or four-person team drives a specially designed sled down an ice track, with the winning team completing the route with the fastest time. The event has been featured since the first Winter Games in 1924 in Chamonix, France, with the exception of the 1960 games in Squaw Valley when the organizing committee decided not to build a track in order to reduce expenses. Other than that exception, the four-man competition has been competed at every game. The two-man event was introduced at the 1932 games and a two-woman event was first contested at the 2002 Winter Olympics.

Luge at the 1976 Winter Olympics consisted of three events at Olympic Sliding Centre Innsbruck. The competition took place between February 4 and February 7, 1976.

GamesVenueOther sports hosted at venue for those gamesCapacityRef.
1964 Innsbruck Bob und Rodelbahn Igls Bobsleigh (separate track)Not listed. [1]
1968 Grenoble Piste de Luge NoneNot listed. [2]
1972 Sapporo Mt. Teine Luge Course NoneNot listed. [3]
1976 Innsbruck Kominierte Kunsteisbahn für Bob-Rodel Igls Bobsleigh Not listed. [4]
1980 Lake Placid Mt. Van Hoevenberg Bob and Luge Run Bobsleigh (separate track)11,000 (bobsleigh) [5]
1984 Sarajevo Trebević Bobsleigh 4,000 (luge)
7,500 (bobsleigh)
[6]
1988 Calgary Canada Olympic Park (includes bobsleigh/luge track) Bobsleigh, Freestyle skiing (demonstration), Nordic combined (ski jumping), Ski jumping 25,000 (bobsleigh/luge)
35,000 (ski jumping)
15,000 (freestyle)
[7]
1992 Albertville La Plagne Bobsleigh Not listed. [8]
1994 Lillehammer Lillehammer Olympic Bobsleigh and Luge Track Bobsleigh 10,000 [9]
1998 Nagano Spiral Bobsleigh 10,000 [10]
2002 Salt Lake City Utah Olympic Park (includes bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton track) Bobsleigh, Nordic combined (ski jumping), Skeleton, Ski Jumping 18,100(ski jumping)
15,000 (bobsleigh, luge, skeleton)
[11]
2006 Turin Cesana Pariol Bobsleigh, Skeleton 4,400 [12]
2010 Vancouver The Whistler Sliding Centre Bobsleigh, Skeleton 12,000 [13]
2014 Sochi Sliding Center Sanki Bobsleigh, Skeleton 9,000 [14]
2018 PyeongChang Alpensia Sliding Centre Bobsleigh, Skeleton 11,000
2022 Beijing Xiaohaituo Bobsleigh and Luge Track Bobsleigh, Skeleton 5,000

Related Research Articles

Olympic Sliding Centre Innsbruck sports venue

The Olympic Sliding Centre Innsbruck is a venue for bobsleigh, luge and skeleton located in Igls, Austria. The most recent version of the track was completed in 1975 and is the first permanent, combination artificially refrigerated bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton track, serving as a model for other tracks of its kind worldwide. It hosted the bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton competitions for the 2012 Winter Youth Olympics.

Mt. Van Hoevenberg Olympic Bobsled Run

The Mt. Van Hoevenberg Olympic Bobsled Run is a venue for bobsleigh, luge and skeleton located at the Lake Placid Olympic Sports Complex in Lake Placid, New York, United States. This venue was used for the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics and for the only winter Goodwill Games in 2000. The third and most recent version of the track was completed in 2000 with the track hosting both the first FIBT World Championships and FIL World Luge Championships done outside of Europe, doing so in 1949 and 1983. In 2010 the bobsled track was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Canada Olympic Park bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton track

The Canada Olympic Park bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton track is a bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton track located in Calgary, Alberta. Part of Canada Olympic Park, it hosted the bobsleigh and luge competitions at the 1988 Winter Olympics. This track is one of only two of its type in the world to be featured in a non-documentary film when it was part of the 1993 American film Cool Runnings which loosely followed the Jamaican Bobsled Team during their competition in bobsleigh at the 1988 Games.

For the 1964 Winter Olympics in Innsbruck, Austria, a total of eight sports venues were used. Luge made its debut at these games, but were marred by the death of a British slider two weeks prior to the Games. A second ski jumping event debuted and the best two out of three jumps were used in both events for the only time in the history of the Winter Olympics. All eight venues would be used again when the Winter Games returned to Innsbruck twelve years later though the venues would undergo renovations in time for the 1976 Games.

For the 1968 Winter Olympics in Grenoble, France, a total of ten sports venues were used. Most venues were constructed between the 1964 Winter Games in Innsbruck and the 1968 Games. Thawing was an issue for the four-man bobsleigh run. They were limited to only two runs. Thawing also affected the men's 500 m speed skating event. Electronic timing in alpine skiing affected the results of the women's giant slalom event. It gave Canada's Nancy Greene a headache for two days despite her gold medal in the event.

For the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan, a total of twelve sports venues were used. A thirteenth venue which was a reserved luge course was constructed, but never used in actual competition. Construction on all but of the venues used took place between 1968 and early 1971 in time for the test events. The Tsuskisamu Indoor Skating Rink was not completed until late 1971 or early 1972 because the number of teams scheduled to compete at the 1972 Games was not known. At the actual luge venue used, a malfunctioning starting gate during the first run led to the results being cancelled and rerun being ordered. The results of this event led to the only tie in Olympic luge history. The ski jumps at Miyanomori and Okurayama served as host venues for the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships thirty-five years later.

Venues of the 1976 Winter Olympics

For the 1976 Winter Olympics in Innsbruck, Austria, a total of eight sports venues were used. The games were originally awarded to Denver, Colorado in the United States in 1970, but they withdrew in the wake of Colorado residents voting against it for environmental and cost reasons in November 1972. This led to the International Olympic Committee opening up the bids for the games again, eventually awarding them to Innsbruck in February 1973. The Austrian city, having hosted the Winter Olympics in 1964, was in the process of having the venues used for those Games before Denver's with clear cutting of the alpine skiing venues, lessening of the amount of cross-country skiing routes, upgrading the ski jumps, adding lighting in the indoor sports arena to accommodate color television, and the construction of a combination bobsleigh and luge track. After the 1976 Games, the venues have remained in use, hosting events in Nordic skiing and the sliding sports. They hosted some of the events for the Winter Universiade in 2005 and seven of the eight venues served as host for the first Winter Youth Olympic Games in 2012.

Venues of the 1980 Winter Olympics

For the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York, United States, a total of seven sports venues were used. All five of the venues used for the 1932 Winter Olympics were also used at the 1980 Winter Games with adjustments. These adjustments included electronic scoreboards, increased refrigeration, and the addition of a separate luge track. This was the last Winter Olympics where there were separate bobsleigh and luge tracks. The closest finish in Olympic history in cross-country skiing led skiing officials to time future events in hundredths of a second rather than tenths of a second. This would also apply to biathlon events. Eric Heiden of the United States won five gold medals at the speed skating oval while the "Miracle on Ice" took place between Americans and Soviets at the Olympic Center. In the late 1990s, the luge track was demolished and a new combination track was constructed in time for the only Winter Goodwill Games held. The sliding venue was named to the American National Register of Historical Places in February 2010.

For the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, a total of nine sports venues were used. The idea for the Games came around from a 1968 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development study on promoting winter tourism in Yugoslavia. After Sarajevo was awarded the 1984 Games in 1978, venue construction and renovation took place between 1979 and 1983. Weather postponed the men's downhill alpine skiing event three times before it was finally run. The men's cross-country skiing 30 km event was run during a blizzard. After the games, all but one of the venues were damaged during the Bosnian War and the Siege of Sarajevo. After the war, Zetra Ice Hall was rebuilt and is in use as of 2010.

Venues of the 1988 Winter Olympics

For the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, a total of nine sports venues were used. Calgary tried twice to host the Winter Olympics in the 1960s without success before finally winning the 1988 Winter Games in 1981. Stampede Corral was built in 1950 while McMahon Stadium was built in 1960. When the National Hockey League (NHL) Flames franchise was relocated from Atlanta, Georgia in the United States during the summer of 1980, a new arena was needed. The Saddledome construction was underway in late 1981 when Calgary was awarded the 1988 Games. Completed in 1983, the Olympic Saddledome has played host to the Flames ever since, including three Stanley Cup Finals and the NHL All-Star Game in 1985. An innovation for the games was the first indoor long-track speed skating venue which has served as a model for future Olympics. The bobsleigh and luge track was the first combination track in North America and was noted for the Jamaican bobsleigh team crash during the four-man event. Both the Oval and the bobsleigh/luge track continue to host the World Championships in their respective sports since the 1988 Winter Olympics.

Venues of the 1998 Winter Olympics

For the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, a total of fifteen sports venues were used. Nagano had attempted twice to host the Winter Olympics, losing out to Sapporo, host of the 1972 Winter Olympics. The third time, in 1991, Nagano edged out Salt Lake City to host the 1998 Games. The biathlon venue was adjusted in accordance with the Washington Convention over endangered species. The biggest venue controversy was at Happo'one resort on the length of the men's downhill and the battle that ensued to the point where skiing officials threatened to pull the event entirely before a compromise was reached three months before the Olympics. M-Wave has hosted three World Speed Skating Championships since the Olympics while the Spiral has hosted a couple of World championships in bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton.

References

  1. 1964 Winter Olympic Games Official report. Archived 2012-02-07 at the Wayback Machine pp. 40, 65, 69, 165, 178, 180. Accessed 30 October 2010. ‹See Tfd› (in German)
  2. 1968 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2008-02-26 at the Wayback Machine pp. 102-104. Accessed 1 November 2010. ‹See Tfd› (in English) & ‹See Tfd› (in French)
  3. 1972 Olympic Winter Games official report. pp. 129, 252, 273-80. Accessed 6 November 2010. ‹See Tfd› (in English) & ‹See Tfd› (in French)
  4. 1976 Winter Olympics official report Archived 2008-02-26 at the Wayback Machine , pp. 143-5, 153, 186-7, 206-208. Accessed 10 November 2010. ‹See Tfd› (in English), ‹See Tfd› (in French), and ‹See Tfd› (in German)
  5. 1980 Winter Olympic Games official report - Volume 1. pp. 57-66. Accessed 16 November 2010. ‹See Tfd› (in English) & ‹See Tfd› (in French)
  6. 1984 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2011-12-21 at WebCite pp. 61, 64-70, 107, 180, 184. Accessed 22 November 2010. ‹See Tfd› (in English), ‹See Tfd› (in French), & (in Serbo-Croatian)
  7. 1988 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2011-01-14 at the Wayback Machine Part 1. pp. 110-27. Accessed 29 November 2010. ‹See Tfd› (in English) & ‹See Tfd› (in French)
  8. 1992 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2008-02-26 at the Wayback Machine pp. 92-95, 350-5. Accessed 5 December 2010. ‹See Tfd› (in English) & ‹See Tfd› (in French)
  9. 1994 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2010-12-02 at the Wayback Machine Volume 3. pp. 37-41. Accessed 8 December 2010.
  10. 1998 Winter Olympics official report Volume 2. pp. 184-5, 226-9. Accessed 12 December 2010.
  11. 2002 Winter Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 84-7. Accessed 21 December 2010.
  12. 2006 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2010-05-06 at the Wayback Machine Volume 3. pp. 61-3. Accessed 27 December 2010. ‹See Tfd› (in English) & ‹See Tfd› (in Italian)
  13. "VenuesThe Whistler Sliding Centre". Vancouver Organizing Committee. Retrieved 2010-03-10.
  14. Sochi2014.com profile of the Russian National Sliding Centre. Accessed 31 December 2010.