List of psychiatric medications

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This is an alphabetical list of psychiatric medications used by psychiatrists and other physicians to treat mental illness or distress.

Contents

A

Acamprosate, Alprazolam, Amisulpride, Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Amphetamine, Aripiprazole, Atomoxetine

B

Benperidol, Bromazepam, Bupropion, Buspirone

C

Calcium carbimide, Carbamazepine, Chlordiazepoxide, Chlorpromazine, Citalopram, Clomipramine, Clonazepam, Clonidine, Clozapine

D

Desvenlafaxine, Diazepam, Disulfiram, Duloxetine

E

Escitalopram, Eszopiclone

F

Fluoxetine, Fluphenazine, Flurazepam, Fluvoxamine

G

Gabapentin, Guanfacine

H

Haloperidol

I

Imipramine, Itopride

L

Lamotrigine, Lemborexant, Levomepromazine, Lithium, Lorazepam, Loxapine, Lumateperone, Lurasidone

M

Maprotiline, Melperone, Mesoridazine, Methamphetamine, Methylphenidate, Mirtazapine, Moclobemide, Modafinil

N

Naltrexone, Nitrazepam, Nortriptyline

O

Olanzapine, Oxazepam, Oxcarbazepine

P

Paliperidone, Paroxetine, Perphenazine, Phenelzine, Phenytoin, Pimavanserin, Pimozide, Pipotiazine, Pramipexole, Primidone, Prochlorperazine, Promethazine, Prothipendyl, Protriptyline

Q

Quetiapine

R

Reboxetine, Risperidone, Rozerem, Rubidium chloride

S

Sertraline, Sulpiride

T

Temazepam, Thioridazine, Thiothixene, Tranylcypromine, Trazodone, Triazolam, Trifluoperazine, Trimipramine

V

Valbenazine, Valproate, Venlafaxine

Z

Zaleplon, Ziprasidone, Zolpidem, Zopiclone, Zotepine, Zuclopenthixol

See also

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Prochlorperazine chemical compound

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