Masovians

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The Masovians or Mazovians (Polish: Mazowszanie [ˈmazɔvˈʂaɲɛ] ) are a Lechitic tribe or an ethnic group associated with the region of Mazovia. They were referenced by Nestor the Chronicler in the 11th century.

River Bug which flows it course through east Masovia. Modern name is not far from old germanic word *baug-s; which meant something winding or bent and was well explained in work of 12th C scholar Gervase of Tilbury Wyszkow Bug.jpg
River Bug which flows it course through east Masovia. Modern name is not far from old germanic word *baug-s; which meant something winding or bent and was well explained in work of 12th C scholar Gervase of Tilbury

Mazovians were pagan before Christianisation. Perhaps they formerly buried the dead toward the North Star. [1] Their main settlements were probably in the area of Płock. Later, the inhabitants of Mazovia used to be called Mazurzy

(singular: Mazur ). Today, the term Mazovians is again in use and refers to the contemporary inhabitants of the Mazovian Voivodeship in Poland. Like most Poles, Masovians are Roman Catholics.

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The adjective Mazovian may refer to:

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