Norfolk and Suffolk-class lifeboat

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H.F. Bailey ON670 1923 to 1924.jpg
Class overview
NameNorfolk and Suffolk-class
Operators Flag of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.svg Royal National Lifeboat Institution
General characteristics - motor lifeboats
Displacement14-17 tons
Length46 ft 6 in (14.17 m)
Beam12 ft 9 in (3.89 m)
Installed power
  • ON 432: 32 bhp Blake 4SA 4-cyl. petrol
  • ON 663: 60 bhp Tyler D.1 4-cyl. petrol
  • ON 670: 80bhp Weyburn DE6 6-cyl. petrol
  • ON 691: 80bhp White DE6 6-cyl. petrol
PropulsionSingle screw
Speed8 knots (9.2 mph; 15 km/h)
Range~115 nautical miles (132 mi; 213 km)
Crew13

Norfolk and Suffolk-class lifeboats were lifeboats operated by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) from stations around the coasts of the United Kingdom and Ireland. They were able to operate further from shore and around the sandbanks common off East Anglia.

Contents

Description

Norfolk and Suffolk class of non-self righting lifeboats were designed to operate further from shore and specifically around East Anglia. Originally a pulling and sailing design, in 1906 the Walton-on-the-Naze's RNLB James Stevens No. 14 (ON 432), built in 1900, was fitted with a 32 bhp petrol engine and served at the station until 1928. Originally, the engines in motor lifeboats were regarded as an auxiliary and they retained their full sailing rig. The conversion of James Stevens No. 14 was deemed a success and a further number of new motor lifeboats were built for service at East Anglian stations.

Pulling & Sailing lifeboats

ON [lower-alpha 1] NameBuiltBuilderDescriptionIn servicePrincipal StationDisposal
Solebay 40-foot (12 m)1841-1858 Southwold
29 Harriett / London Coal Exchange No. 1 40-foot (12 m)1858-1893Southwold
270 Margaret 44 ft (13 m) ?

1899-1901

Winterton

Albeburgh

304 Aldeburgh 1890Mr. Critten of [Great] Yarmouth44 ft 3 in (13.49 m)14 oars, double banked [1] 1890-1899Albeburgh Capsized with the loss of seven of the 18 crew.
353 Alfred Corry 1893 Beeching Brothers of Great Yarmouth44-foot (13 m), with two-masts and 16 oars. [2] [3] 1893-1919Southwoldsold 1919
Bolton 42-foot (13 m)1918-1925Southwold
430 James Stevens No. 9 [4] 189938-foot (12 m), 12-foot (3.7 m) beam inside, 14-foot (4.3 m) outside, carried a crew of 15.1899-1909 Southend-on-Sea
432 James Stevens No.14 1900 Thames Ironworks, Blackwall43-foot (13 m)
Engine fitted 1906
1900 - 1928 Walton and Frinton sold June 1928
482 City of Westminster 1902Thames Iron Works Company46 ft (14 m)12 oars, double banked [5] 1902 - 1928Aldeburgh

Motor lifeboats

ONNameBuiltBuilderIn servicePrincipal StationDisposal
432James Stevens No.14 [6] 1900Thames Ironworks, Blackwall1900–1928 Walton and Frinton sold June 1928
656Hearts of Oak [7]
length - 40-foot (12 m)
beam - 10-foot (3.0 m)
1918 Summers and Payne, Southampton
completed by S. E. Saunders, Cowes
1918–1929
1929–1934
Palling no 2
Relief fleet
663John and Mary Meiklam Of Gladswood (1921)
Agnes Cross (1921–1952)
1921S. E. Saunders, Cowes1921
1921–1939
1939–1952
Great Yarmouth and Gorleston
Lowestoft
Relief fleet
Sold October 1952
670H.F. Bailey (1923–1924)
John and Mary Meiklam of Gladswood (1924–1952)
1923 J. Samuel White, Cowes1923–1924
1924–1939
1939–1952
Cromer No.1
Great Yarmouth and Gorleston
Relief fleet
Sold October 1952
691Mary Scott1925J. Samuel White, Cowes1925–1940
1940–1953
Southwold
Relief fleet
Sold March 1953
  1. ON is the RNLI's Official Number of the boat.

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References

  1. "Aldeburgh - New Lifeboat". Eastern Daily Times. 3 January 1891.
  2. "Alfred Corry Lifeboat". Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 17 April 2015.
  3. "LOWESTOFT HISTORY - LOWESTOFT LIFEBOATS - Joe Capp's Lowestoft - A Lowestoft photographer's website Lowestoft Suffolk England - interesting places in the Lowestoft area". Archived from the original on 6 January 2009. Retrieved 24 March 2013.
  4. Southend Standard, 21 September 1899
  5. "New Life-Boat for Aldeburgh". Framlingham Weekly News. 8 November 1902.
  6. "Restoration of James Steven No.14 Lifeboat - Frinton & Walton Heritage Trust". Essex Heritage Trust. Archived from the original on 20 April 2013. Retrieved 24 March 2013.
  7. Diss Express, and Norfolk and Suffork Journal, 28 June 1918