Parliament of Botswana

Last updated
National Assembly
Coat of arms of Botswana.svg
Type
Type
Seats61 members
Meeting place
BotswanaParliament.jpg
Parliament Building, Gaborone
Website
www.parliament.gov.bw

The Parliament of Botswana consists of the President and the National Assembly . [1] In contrast to other Parliamentary systems, the Parliament elects the President directly (instead of having both a ceremonial President and a Prime Minister who has real authority as head of government) for a set five-year term of office. A president can only serve 2 full terms. The President is both head of State and of Government in Botswana's parliamentary republican system. Parliament of Botswana is the supreme legislative authority. [2] The former President of Botswana is Ian Khama, who assumed the Presidency on 1 April 2008 and won a full five-year term in the postceding Botswana General elections, which were held on 16 October 2009 and returned his Botswana Democratic Party with a majority of 35 (total of 45) seats in the 61 seat Parliament.

Contents

There also exists a body known as Ntlo ya Dikgosi , (The House of Chiefs), which is an advisory body that does not form part of the Parliament. [3]

Botswana is one of only two nations on the African continent (with the other being Mauritius) to have achieved a clean record of free and fair elections since independence, having held 10 elections since 1966 without any serious incidents of corruption. [4]

See also

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References

  1. Constitution of the Democratic Republic of Botswana, 1966
  2. "Parliament of Botswana". Parliament of Botswana. 19 March 2021. Retrieved 19 March 2021.
  3. Proctor, J. H. (1968). "The House of Chiefs and the Political Development of Botswana". The Journal of Modern African Studies. 6 (1): 59–79. doi:10.1017/S0022278X00016670. ISSN   0022-278X. JSTOR   158677.
  4. US State Department