Real Live Tour

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Real Live Tour
Tour by Iron Maiden
Real Live Tour Poster.jpg
Official tour advertisement for the band's performance in Berlin, 11 April 1993
Start date25 March 1993
End date28 August 1993
No. of shows46 in total
Iron Maiden concert chronology

The Real Live Tour was a concert tour by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden from 25 March 1993 to 28 August 1993. It was the last tour which featured lead vocalist Bruce Dickinson before his return to the band in 1999, leaving to pursue a solo career, [1] his final shows taking place at Pinewood Studios and filmed for the live video, Raising Hell . [2]

Contents

As he had already announced his plans to leave before the tour began, Dickinson states that the concerts were extremely challenging, explaining that "we walked out onstage and it was like a morgue. The Maiden fans knew I'd quit, they knew these were the last gigs, and I suddenly realised that, as the frontman, you're in an almost impossible situation. If you're like, 'Wow, this is really fucking cool tonight, man,' they're all gonna sit there going, 'What a wanker. He's leaving. How can it be cool?' Or do you go on and say, 'Look, I'm really sorry I'm leaving – not to put a damper on the evening, but I am quitting'? I mean, what do you do?" [3] Bassist Steve Harris claims that, during the less high-profile shows, Dickinson would deliberately underperform, sometimes just mumbling into the microphone, although Dickinson has since denied the allegations. [4] On the 1st May 1993 band performed at Primo Maggio Free Festival in Rome, Piazza San Giovanni. According to different sources crowd was estimated 500.000 to one million people in attendance. Iron Maiden toured an extensive Italian leg and visited Russia for the very first time playing three consecutive nights at Moscow's Olymipic Stadium. [5] [6]

Tour dates

DateCityCountryVenue
Europe
25 March 1993 Faro Portugal Kadoc
27 March 1993 Madrid Spain Sala Canciller
28 March 1993 San Sebastián Polideportivo Anoeta
29 March 1993 Barcelona Zeleste
5 April 1993 Ostrava Czech Republic Ostrava arena
6 April 1993 Bratislava Slovakia Zimný štadión
7 April 1993 Vienna Austria Wiener Stadthalle
9 April 1993 Arnhem Netherlands Rijnhal
10 April 1993 Paris France Élysée Montmartre
11 April 1993 Berlin Germany Huxley's Neue Welt
13 April 1993 Würzburg Carl-Diem-Halle
15 April 1993 Hanover Music Hall
16 April 1993 Bremen Stadthalle
17 April 1993 Essen Grugahalle
19 April 1993 Stuttgart Hanns-Martin-Schleyer-Halle
20 April 1993 Saarbrücken Saarlandhalle
21 April 1993 Augsburg Schwabenhalle
23 April 1993 Gothenburg Sweden Scandinavium
25 April 1993 Bourges FrancePavillon
27 April 1993 Turin Italy Palasport
28 April 1993 Majano Campo Sportivo
29 April 1993 Florence Palasport
30 April 1993 Rome Palaghiaccio
1 May 1993
2 May 1993 Priolo Gargallo Palasport
3 May 1993 Acireale Palasport
5 May 1993 Naples Teatro Tenda
6 May 1993 Bologna Parc Nord
8 May 1993 Genoa Palasport di Genova
9 May 1993 Milan Forum di Assago
11 May 1993 Toulon France Zénith Oméga de Toulon
13 May 1993 Grenoble Summum
14 May 1993 Nancy Zénith de Nancy
16 May 1993 Sheffield England Sheffield Arena
17 May 1993 London Wembley Arena
19 May 1993 Manchester G-Mex
20 May 1993 Birmingham NEC Arena
21 May 1993 Glasgow Scotland S.E.C.C.
23 May 1993 Dublin Ireland The Point
24 May 1993 Belfast Northern Ireland King's Hall, Belfast
27 May 1993 Neuchâtel Switzerland Patinoire du Littoral
2 June 1993 Moscow Russia Olympic Stadium
3 June 1993
4 June 1993
27 August 1993LondonEngland Pinewood Studios
28 August 1993

Reference [2] [7]

Cancelled and rescheduled dates

Setlist

  1. "Be Quick or Be Dead" (from Fear of the Dark , 1992)
  2. "The Number of the Beast" (from The Number of the Beast , 1982)
  3. "Prowler" (from Iron Maiden , 1980)
  4. "Transylvania" (from Iron Maiden, 1980)
  5. "Remember Tomorrow" (from Iron Maiden, 1980)
  6. "Where Eagles Dare" (from Piece of Mind , 1983) (Dropped after April 17, 1993)
  7. "From Here to Eternity" (from Fear of the Dark, 1992)
  8. "Wasting Love" (from Fear of the Dark, 1992)
  9. "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" (from No Prayer for the Dying , 1990)
  10. "Wasted Years" (from Somewhere In Time, 1986)
  11. "The Evil That Men Do" (from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son , 1988)
  12. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" (from Fear of the Dark, 1992)
  13. "Fear of the Dark" (from Fear of the Dark, 1992)
  14. "The Clairvoyant" (from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son, 1988)
  15. "Heaven Can Wait" (from Somewhere in Time, 1986)
  16. "Run to the Hills" (from The Number of the Beast, 1982)
  17. "2 Minutes to Midnight" (from Powerslave , 1984)
  18. "Iron Maiden" (from Iron Maiden, 1980)
  19. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" (from The Number of the Beast, 1982)
  20. "The Trooper" (from Piece of Mind, 1983)
  21. "Sanctuary" (from Iron Maiden, 1980)

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References

  1. Wall, Mick (2004). Iron Maiden: Run to the Hills, the Authorised Biography (3rd ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p. 295. ISBN   1-86074-542-3.
  2. 1 2 Wall, Mick (2004). Iron Maiden: Run to the Hills, the Authorised Biography (3rd ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p. 298. ISBN   1-86074-542-3.
  3. Wall, Mick (2004). Iron Maiden: Run to the Hills, the Authorised Biography (3rd ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p. 296. ISBN   1-86074-542-3.
  4. Wall, Mick (2004). Iron Maiden: Run to the Hills, the Authorised Biography (3rd ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p. 297. ISBN   1-86074-542-3.
  5. "Concerto Primo Maggio" (in Italian). soundsblog.it. 1 June 2021. Retrieved 1 June 2021.
  6. "Concerto Primo Maggio 1993" (in Italian). italymagazine.com. 1 June 2021. Retrieved 1 June 2021.
  7. "Tour Dates". Real Live Tour programme. EMI . Retrieved 2 February 2012.