Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter

Last updated
"Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter"
Song by Bruce Dickinson
from the album A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child
ReleasedAugust 1989
Recorded1989
Genre Heavy metal
Length4:57
Label Jive Records
Songwriter(s) Bruce Dickinson
Producer(s) Chris Tsangarides [1]
"Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter"
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter (Iron Maiden single - cover art).jpg
Single by Iron Maiden
from the album No Prayer for the Dying
B-side
Released24 December 1990
RecordedSummer 1990
Genre Heavy metal
Length4:42 [2]
Label EMI
Songwriter(s) Bruce Dickinson
Iron Maiden singles chronology
"Holy Smoke"
(1990)
"Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter"
(1990)
"Be Quick or Be Dead"
(1992)
Alternate cover
MaidenDaughter.jpg
"Brain Pack" LP cover

"Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" is the second single from the 1990 Iron Maiden album No Prayer for the Dying .

Contents

The song was originally recorded and released by Bruce Dickinson for the soundtrack to A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child , [3] [4] but Steve Harris liked it so Iron Maiden rerecorded it. [5] It is the only UK number-one single for the band to date, [6] in spite of the fact that it received very little airplay on the BBC. The song also topped the Finnish Singles Chart and reached number six in Ireland.

Background

In 1989, while Iron Maiden were taking a break from touring, Zomba asked Dickinson to write a song for A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child . [4] Teaming up with former Gillan (and future Iron Maiden) guitarist Janick Gers, Dickinson recorded the song, which he claims he wrote "in about three minutes," and the project was expanded into an album, Tattooed Millionaire . [7] Upon hearing the completed track, Steve Harris decided that it would be "great for Maiden" and convinced Dickinson not to put it on his solo album. [5]

The original version of the song, which won a Golden Raspberry Award for "Worst Original Song" in 1989, [8] is, according to Dickinson, "substantially different to the Iron Maiden version," explaining that "the arrangement is identical, but mine's kind of... slinky. Maiden's just really goes for it." [5] Dickinson's original version was included on disc 2 of The Best of Bruce Dickinson in 2001. [9]

Bruce Dickinson said "We're going to release this as a single on Christmas Eve to scare the living daylights out of Cliff Richard". This led to the song competing with Cliff Richard's "Saviour's Day" for the 1990 Christmas number-one, but due to not being officially released until the week after Christmas, [10] went straight to number one on the UK Singles Chart on 30 December 1990. [6] This was in spite of a ban by the BBC, [11] who refused to play the song on Radio 1 and showed at least 2 minutes of the live clip for Top of the Pops . The B-side features cover versions of "I'm a Mover" (originally by Free) and Led Zeppelin's "Communication Breakdown".

In addition to the standard 7" and 12" editions, the single was also released as a special edition 7" flip-top "brain pack" edition. [12]

The video clip features footage from The City of the Dead/Horror Hotel [13] (John Llewellyn Moxey, 1960).

Like most songs from the No Prayer for the Dying album, "Bring Your Daughter to the Slaughter" was rarely played live following the supporting tour, No Prayer on the Road , with the band only performing it on selected dates in 1992, 1993 and 2003.

Track listing

7" Single
Side One
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" Bruce Dickinson 4:42
Side Two
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
2."I'm a Mover" (Free Cover) Andy Fraser, Paul Rodgers 3:26
12" Single
Side One
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter"Dickinson4:42
Side Two
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
2."I'm a Mover" (Free Cover)Fraser, Rodgers3:26
3."Communication Breakdown" (Led Zeppelin Cover) Jimmy Page, John Bonham, John Paul Jones 2:42

Personnel

Production credits are adapted from the 7 inch vinyl, [2] and picture disc covers. [14]

Iron Maiden

Production

Versions

SongsCountry & yearCatalog numberFormat
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a MoverAustralia 1990EMI 2552-7Single 7"
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a MoverEEC 1990EMI 204171 7Single 7"
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a MoverUK 1990EMI EMS 171Single 7"
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication BreakdownEEC 1990EMI 060 20 4171 6Maxi Single 12"
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication BreakdownUK 1990EMI 12 EMP 171Maxi Single 12"
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a MoverUK 1990EMI EMPD 171Picture Disc 7"
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication BreakdownUK 1990EMI 12 EMPD 171Picture Disc 12"
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication BreakdownNetherlands 1990EMI CDEM 171CD Single
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication BreakdownJapan Promo 1990EMI TOCP-6572CD Single
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication BreakdownJapan 1990EMI TOCP-6572CD Single
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication BreakdownUK 1990EMI EMS 171CD Single
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication BreakdownUSA Promo 1990EMI Epic ESK 4007CD Single
Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a MoverUK 1990EMI TCEM 171Cassette Single

Charts

Chart (1990–1991)Peak
position
Europe (Eurochart Hot 100) [15] 8
Finland (Suomen virallinen lista) [16] 1
Ireland (IRMA) [17] 6
Netherlands (Dutch Top 40) [18] 30
Netherlands (Single Top 100) [19] 17
New Zealand (Recorded Music NZ) [20] 47
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade) [21] 19
UK Singles (OCC) [6] 1

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References

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  2. 1 2 "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" 7 Inch Single (Media notes). Iron Maiden. EMI. 24 December 1990.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  3. "A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child (Soundtrack)". Nightmare on Elm Street Films. Archived from the original on 24 February 2012. Retrieved 17 December 2008.
  4. 1 2 Wall, Mick (2004). Iron Maiden: Run to the Hills, the Authorised Biography (3rd ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p. 275. ISBN   1-86074-542-3.
  5. 1 2 3 Wall, Mick (2004). Iron Maiden: Run to the Hills, the Authorised Biography (3rd ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p. 282. ISBN   1-86074-542-3.
  6. 1 2 3 "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 31 March 2018.
  7. Wall, Mick (2004). Iron Maiden: Run to the Hills, the Authorised Biography (3rd ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p. 281. ISBN   1-86074-542-3.
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  9. "Interview with Bruce Dickinson October 2001". dmme.net. October 2001. Retrieved 15 August 2011.
  10. Worstall, Tim (18 April 2012). "Iron Maiden's Daughter Slaughter Lesson for Apple's iTunes App Store". Forbes . Retrieved 15 August 2012.
  11. Smith, Sid (2007). "Iron Maiden - No Prayer for the Dying". BBC Music . Retrieved 24 September 2011.
  12. "Iron Maiden – 'Bring Your Daughter... To The Slaughter' (Brain Pack)". Discogs . Retrieved 8 April 2012.
  13. City of the Dead trailer, IMDb
  14. "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" Picture Disc Single (Media notes). Iron Maiden. EMI. 24 December 1990.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  15. "Eurochart Hot 100 Singles" (PDF). Music & Media . Vol. 8 no. 3. 19 January 1991. p. 23. Retrieved 19 January 2020.
  16. Nyman, Jake (2005). Suomi soi 4: Suuri suomalainen listakirja (in Finnish) (1st ed.). Helsinki: Tammi. ISBN   951-31-2503-3.
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  18. "Nederlandse Top 40 – week 7, 1991" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40 Retrieved 31 March 2018.
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