Run to the Hills

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"Run to the Hills"
Iron Maiden - Run to the Hills.jpg
Single by Iron Maiden
from the album The Number of the Beast
B-side
  • 1982 single
  • "Total Eclipse"
  • 1985 live single
  • "Phantom of the Opera" (live) (7" & 12")
  • "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)" (live) (12")
  • 2002 live single
  • Part 1
  • "22 Acacia Avenue (live)"
  • "The Prisoner (live)"
  • "Run to the Hills
  • (Camp Chaos video)"
  • Part 2
  • "Children of the Damned (live)"
  • "Total Eclipse (live)"
  • "Run to the Hills (video)"
Released12 February 1982
2 December 1985
11 March 2002
RecordedJanuary 1982
20 March 1982
28 August 1982
8–12 October 1984
14–17 March 1985
19 January 2001
Genre Heavy metal
Length3:51
Label EMI
Songwriter(s) Steve Harris
Producer(s) Martin Birch
Iron Maiden singles chronology
"Purgatory"
(1981)
"Run to the Hills"
(1982)
"The Number of the Beast"
(1982)

"Running Free (Live in 1985)"
(1985)

"Run to the Hills (Live in 1985)"
(1985)

"Wasted Years"
(1986)

"Out of the Silent Planet"
(2000)

"Run to the Hills (Live in 2001)"
(2002)

"Wildest Dreams"
(2003)
1985 live single
MaidenHills85.jpeg
2002 CD 2 cover
MaidenHills02.jpeg
Bruce Dickinson as Eddie
2002 Limited Edition Red Vinyl 7"
Ltd Ed Red.JPG

"Run to the Hills" is a song by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It was released as their sixth single and the first from the band's third studio album, The Number of the Beast (1982). It is their first single with Bruce Dickinson as vocalist. Credited solely to the band's bassist, Steve Harris, although significant contributions were made by Dickinson, it remains one of their most popular songs, with VH1 ranking it No. 27 on their list of the 40 Greatest Metal Songs [1] and No. 14 on their list of the Greatest Hard Rock Songs. [2]

Contents

A live version of the song, from Live After Death , was released in 1985 and the original single was reissued in 2002, with all income donated to former drummer Clive Burr's MS Trust Fund. In 1990, as part of The First Ten Years box set, both the original and the 1985 live single were reissued on CD and 12" vinyl, combined with "The Number of the Beast" and "Running Free (live)" respectively.

Composition

Due to contractual issues with his previous band, Samson, Dickinson could not be credited for any of his contributions made during the writing of The Number of the Beast. [3] Although bassist Steve Harris alone receives credit for the song, Dickinson states that he made a "moral contribution" to the song, in addition to "Children of the Damned" and "The Prisoner" from the same album. [4] While speaking at the IBM Smarter Business conference in Stockholm on 10 October 2012, Dickinson revealed that parts of the song are based on the "rising sixth" interval within a scale, inspired by a documentary he watched which explored why "My Way" was one of the most popular recorded songs. [5]

Themes

The song documents the colonization of the Americas, first by Europeans and then by Americans, from the perspective of a Cree Indian and American cavalryman. The opening verse is from the perspective of the Cree, describing his troubles as the European Americans "came across the sea", bringing the Cree "pain and misery". [6] [7] The song is written from both perspectives, [8] The second verse is from the perspective of a U.S. cavalry soldier, describing his involvement in the American Indian Wars, "chasing the redskins back to their holes". The third verse is not from the perspective of any single individual, and harshly condemns the effects of American expansionism on Native Americans, resulting in the "[Americans] raping the women and wasting the men", and "enslaving the young and destroying the old". [9]

Original 1982 release

The song was released as a single on 12 February 1982; more than 5 weeks prior to the album's release on 22 March 1982. [10] The single marked Iron Maiden's debut release with new vocalist Bruce Dickinson. "Total Eclipse" was selected as the single's B-side over the song "Gangland", which in turn would appear on the initial version of the album. [11] The band later regretted this decision, with Steve Harris commenting, "We chose the wrong track as the B-side. I think if "Total Eclipse" had been on the album instead of "Gangland", it would have been far better." [11] The song was added to The Number of the Beast album when it was remastered in 1998, and was also included in the original Japanese version.

It is the second of three single covers featuring Derek Riggs' depiction of Satan, which debuted on "Purgatory" and later appeared on "The Number of the Beast" covers. According to Riggs, the idea behind the original "Run to the Hills" cover was based around the idea of a "power struggle in hell", in which the band's mascot, Eddie, battles Satan with a tomahawk (referencing the song's subject matter). [12]

As of 2017 the single has sold more than 200,000 copies in UK and has been certified Silver by BPI, the first to do so. [13]

Other releases

In 1985, a live version of "Run to the Hills", taken from Live After Death , was released as the band's thirteenth single, along with live versions of "Phantom of the Opera" and "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)" as its B-sides. According to Riggs, he was asked to paint a cover illustration for both "Run to the Hills" and "Phantom of the Opera" and so the artwork depicts Eddie as the phantom in a hilly landscape. [14]

Following former drummer Clive Burr's announcement that he was suffering from multiple sclerosis, "Run to the Hills" was released again in 2002 to raise money for the newly established Clive Burr MS Trust Fund. [15] Two variations were issued, the original studio version and a live version taken from the Rock in Rio concert, with different B-sides. [16]

Appearances in media

An all-star cover version of the song is found on the 2005 tribute album Numbers from the Beast , featuring Robin McAuley on vocals, Michael Schenker and Pete Fletcher on guitars, Tony Franklin on bass and Brian Tichy (Derek Sherinian, B'z) on drums. [17] [18] The all-female tribute band The Iron Maidens recorded the song on their 2005 debut album, World's Only Female Tribute to Iron Maiden . [19] Former Babes in Toyland singer and guitarist Kat Bjelland's Katastrophy Wife covered the song in their Heart On EP in 2007. [20] The song was covered in 2008 by Sign on the tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine. [21] The Swedish lounge metal band Hellsongs included a cover version on their 2008 album Hymns in the Key of 666. [22] In 2009, the eventual Swedish Idol 2009 series winner Erik Grönwall sang it during the live shows and released it as a single in the same year, which peaked at No. 23 in the Swedish Singles Chart. [23] Progressive metal band Dream Theater covered the song live, along with the entire The Number of the Beast album, and released it as an "official bootleg" in 2006. [24]

The song is also featured in the soundtracks of several video games, including SSX on Tour (2005) as the title's main theme, [25] and Grand Theft Auto: The Lost and Damned (2009). [26] In addition, a cover version is featured in Rock Band (2007), in which it received an "Impossible" difficulty rating, [27] while the original version was made available via download in June 2009. [28]

Video

The official video features fight scenes from the 1923 silent movie The Uncovered Wagon , a parody on the movie The Covered Wagon , also from 1923. [29]

Track listing

7" single
Side one
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Run to the Hills" Steve Harris 3:51
Side two
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
2."Total Eclipse" Dave Murray, Harris, Clive Burr 4:24
1985 7" Live single
Side one
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Run to the Hills" (Live at Long Beach Arena, California, America, 14–17 March 1985)Harris4:03
Side two
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
2."Phantom of the Opera" (Live at Hammersmith Odeon, London, England, 8–10 & 12 October 1984)Harris7:27
1985 12" Live single
Side one
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Run to the Hills" (Live at Long Beach Arena, California, America, 14–17 March 1985)Harris4:03
Side two
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
2."Phantom of the Opera" (Live at Hammersmith Odeon, London, England, 8–10 & 12 October 1984)Harris7:27
3."Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)" (Live at Hammersmith Odeon, London, England, 8–10 & 12 October 1984)Harris4:14
2002 7" Red Vinyl single
Side one
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Run to the Hills"Harris3:51
Side two
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
2."Total Eclipse" (Live at Hammersmith Odeon, London, England, 20 March 1982)Burr, Harris, Murray4:24
2002 Enhanced CD Part. I
Compact Disc
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Run to the Hills" (Live at Rock in Rio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 19 January 2001)Harris5:00
2."Children of the Damned" (Live at Hammersmith Odeon, London, England, 20 March 1982)Harris4:34
3."Total Eclipse" (Live at Hammersmith Odeon, London, England, 20 March 1982)Murray, Harris, Burr3:59
4."Run to the Hills" (Live video)Harrisunknown
2002 Enhanced CD Part. II
Compact Disc
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Run to the Hills"Harris3:56
2."22 Acacia Avenue" (Live at the Reading Festival, Reading, England, 28 August 1982)Harris, Adrian Smith 6:34
3."The Prisoner" (Live at the Reading Festival, Reading, England, 28 August 1982)Harris, Smith5:56
4."Run to the Hills" (Camp Chaos video)HarrisUnknown
2002 Enhanced CD European Edition
Compact Disc
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Run to the Hills" (Live at Rock in Rio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 19 January 2001)Harris5:01
2."Run to the Hills"Harris3:54
3."The Prisoner" (Live at the Reading Festival, Reading, England, 28 August 1982)Harris, Smith5:56
4."Children of the Damned" (Live at the Hammersmith Odeon, London, England, 20 March 1982)Harris4:34
5."Run to the Hills" (Live video)HarrisUnknown

Personnel

1982 studio single

Production credits are adapted from the 7-inch vinyl cover. [30]

Production

1985 live single

Production credits are adapted from the 7-inch vinyl, [31] and 12-inch vinyl covers. [32]

Iron Maiden
Production

2002 studio / live single

Chart performance

SingleChart (1982)Peak
position
Album
"Run to the Hills"Australia (Kent Music Report)27 [33] The Number of the Beast
Irish Singles Chart 16 [34]
UK Singles Chart 7 [35]
SingleChart (1985)Peak
position
Album
"Run to the Hills (Live)"Irish Singles Chart18 [34] Live After Death
UK Singles Chart26 [36]
SingleChart (1990)Peak
position
Album
"Run to the Hills / The Number of the Beast" UK Albums Chart [note 1] 3 [37]
"Running Free (Live) / Run to the Hills (Live)"9 [38]
SingleChart (2002)Peak
position
Album
"Run to the Hills (Live)" Canadian Singles Chart 11 [39] Rock in Rio
Dutch Singles Chart 60 [40]
Finnish Singles Chart 5 [41]
French Singles Chart 73 [42]
German Singles Chart 55 [43]
Irish Singles Chart38 [44]
Italian Singles Chart 6 [45]
Norwegian Singles Chart 15 [46]
Swedish Singles Chart 28 [47]
Swiss Singles Chart 75 [48]
UK Singles Chart9 [35]

Notes

  1. Re-release of all four singles as part of The First Ten Years box set. Exceeded the length limit of the UK Singles chart.

Certifications

RegionCertification Certified units/sales
United Kingdom (BPI) [49] Silver200,000Double-dagger-14-plain.png

Double-dagger-14-plain.png Sales+streaming figures based on certification alone.

See also

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