SSX Tricky

Last updated
SSX Tricky
SSX Tricky.jpg
Developer(s) EA Canada
Publisher(s) EA Sports BIG
Series SSX
Platform(s) PlayStation 2, GameCube, Xbox, Game Boy Advance
ReleasePlayStation 2
  • NA: November 5, 2001
  • EU: November 30, 2001
GameCube
  • NA: December 2, 2001
  • EU: July 12, 2002
Xbox
  • NA: December 10, 2001
  • EU: June 14, 2002
Game Boy Advance
  • NA: October 31, 2002
  • EU: November 1, 2002
Genre(s) Snowboarding
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer

SSX Tricky is a snowboarding video game, the second game in the SSX series published under the EA Sports BIG label and developed by EA Canada. The game is a sequel to SSX . The game was released in 2001 for PlayStation 2, GameCube and Xbox and was later ported to the Game Boy Advance in October 2002.

Snowboarding games are a genre of computer and video games that emulate the sports of snowboarding and sandboarding. Most snowboarding games are seasonal and come out sometime between October and March. The genre peaked in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Many online casual games have been made for the genre recently. Likewise, several games have been made for iOS and Android mobile devices.

<i>SSX</i> (series) video game series by EA Sports

SSX is a series of snowboarding and skiing video games published by EA Sports. It is an arcade-style racing game with larger-than-life courses, characters, and tricks. While the general focus of the series is racing and performing tricks on snowboards, the underlying gameplay of each edition alters slightly; for example, while the original SSX relies on a working knowledge of speed and trick boosts, SSX On Tour requires players to complete different "phat" combos and "monster tricks". SSX is intended to be short for "Snowboard Supercross", but the complete title has almost never actually been referred to in any way in the marketing or promotion of the games or within the games themselves. According to 2012's SSX the acronym in Team SSX means: Snowboarding, Surfing, and Motocross.

A video game publisher is a company that publishes video games that have been developed either internally by the publisher or externally by a video game developer. As with book publishers or publishers of DVD movies, video game publishers are responsible for their product's manufacturing and marketing, including market research and all aspects of advertising.

Contents

Gameplay

Gameplay continues the same basic method introduced in SSX , with the main tracks being 'remixed' from the previous games and two new tracks, Garibaldi and Alaska. The important new feature added to the series are the Uber moves. If players are able to fill their boost bar to the maximum, they will be able to perform Uber moves which involve characters taking their feet off their board and doing over the top moves. If a player successfully lands an Uber move, they are given a short amount of time for infinite boost, which can be topped off by performing more Uber moves. Each player can perform five Uber moves, including a personal move if the character is using a board that matches their style. If a player successfully performs six Uber moves, spelling out 'tricky' on the boost bar, they will have infinite boost for the remainder of the level.

Also introduced in the game is a rivalry system in the World Circuit mode. If the player is friendly with another AI character, they will treat the player favourably. However, if the player ends up annoying other AI characters, generally by attacking them during the race in order to fill the adrenaline bar, they will become hostile towards players in future events.

Modes

There are four modes of gameplay.

Freeride
The Freeride mode of gameplay does not allow players to unlock characters or boards. It enables players to play with either one or two players, as well as allowing you to get to know the course. It does, however, allow you to unlock outfits by completing a trick chapter.
Practice
Practice Mode is a great place for beginners to get the opportunity to get used to snowboarding. As in Freeride, players have the ability to do what they wish, and to practice tricks.
World Circuit
In the World Circuit mode, players have the ability to unlock characters, boards and outfits by racing and competing in events. There are two main categories of events; Race and Show-off. In race, the player must compete in the Quarter- and Semi-finals, and then in the Finals and get within the top three places to "win" that track; the medals are Bronze, Silver and Gold.
There are eight tracks to complete. When racing, players must attempt to stay in the lead of their five opponents. In show-off, players are required to perform as many fancy tricks as they can and obtain as many points as they can.
If this mode is completed in Race, the extra track "Untracked" is unlocked for Freeplay. Similar to Showoff is Pipedream.
Single Event
Single Event takes, as its name suggests, one of the events over a single heat from World Circuit mode. Medals are awarded at the end of the track, and a second human player can be added.

Development

During development, SSX Tricky was referred to using various names, such as SSX 1.5 and SSX CD. [1]

Reception

Reception
Review scores
PublicationScore
GBA GC PS2 Xbox
AllGame Star full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svg [2] Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [3] Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [4] N/A
Edge N/AN/A7/10 [5] N/A
EGM N/AN/A8.5/10 [6] N/A
Eurogamer N/AN/A9/10 [7] 9/10 [8]
Game Informer 4/10 [9] 8.5/10 [10] 9/10 [11] 9/10 [12]
GamePro Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svgStar empty.svg [13] Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svg [14] Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svg [15] Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svg [16]
Game Revolution N/AB+ [17] A− [18] B+ [19]
GameSpot 7.8/10 [20] 8.8/10 [21] 9.4/10 [22] 8.8/10 [23]
GameSpy N/A85% [24] Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svg [25] Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svg [26]
GameZoneN/A8.5/10 [27] 9/10 [28] N/A
IGN 6.5/10 [29] 7.9/10 [30] 9.4/10 [31] 9/10 [32]
Nintendo Power Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svg [33] Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svg [34] N/AN/A
OPM (US) N/AN/AStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svg [35] N/A
OXM (US) N/AN/AN/A8.7/10 [36]
FHM N/AN/AStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [37] N/A
Aggregate score
Metacritic 66/100 [38] 87/100 [39] 92/100 [40] 88/100 [41]

The PlayStation 2 version received "universal acclaim", and the GameCube and Xbox versions received "favorable" reviews, while the Game Boy Advance version received "average" reviews according to video game review aggregator Metacritic. [38] [39] [40] [41]

A review aggregator is a system that collects reviews of products and services. This system stores the reviews and uses them for purposes such as supporting a website where users can view the reviews, selling information to third parties about consumer tendencies, and creating databases for companies to learn about their actual and potential customers. The system enables users to easily compare many different reviews of the same work. Many of these systems calculate an approximate average assessment, usually based on assigning a numeric value to each review related to its degree of positive rating of the work.

Metacritic is a website that aggregates reviews of media products: films, TV shows, music albums, video games, and formerly, books. For each product, the scores from each review are averaged. Metacritic was created by Jason Dietz, Marc Doyle, and Julie Doyle Roberts in 1999. The site provides an excerpt from each review and hyperlinks to its source. A color of green, yellow or red summarizes the critics' recommendations. It has been described as the video game industry's "premier" review aggregator.

Most reviews hesitated before calling the game a "true sequel" [25] since it shared a large amount of content with the original SSX (all but two of the courses appear in the original). Reviews did compliment the added features, such as "Uber tricks" and "Rivalry" with other boarders. [32] Some reviewers thought that the improvements over the original were so good that SSX Tricky was billed as the best snowboarding game to date. [22] The voice acting was highly praised by many reviewers, noting that the use of celebrities such as Lucy Liu helped bring the outrageous characters to life. [25] The music system received much acclaim as it was able to adapt to suit the situation. Each course had specific songs paired with it to match the mood and when riders reached maximum boost or were knocked down, the music reacts. [22] The size of the environments, the detail of the graphics and the trick system also received plenty of recognition from reviewers. In Japan, Famitsu gave it a score of 32 out of 40 for the GameCube version, [42] 30 out of 40 for the PS2 version, [43] and three sevens and one eight (29/40) for the Xbox version. [44]

Lucy Liu American actress and model

Lucy Liu is an American actress, voice actress, director and artist who became known for playing the role of the vicious and ill-mannered Ling Woo in the television series Ally McBeal (1998–2002), for which she was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series and a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series. Liu's film work includes starring as one of the heroines in Charlie's Angels (2000), portraying O-Ren Ishii in Kill Bill (2003) and starring roles in the main casts of Payback and Chicago, and the animated film series Kung Fu Panda (2008–present) portraying the character Master Viper.

<i>Famitsu</i> periodical literature

Famitsu is a line of Japanese video game magazines published by Enterbrain, Inc. and Tokuma. Famitsu is published in both weekly and monthly formats as well as in the form of special topical issues devoted to only one console, video game company, or other theme. Shūkan Famitsū, the original Famitsū publication, is considered the most widely read and respected video game news magazine in Japan. From October 28, 2011 Enterbrain began releasing the digital version of the magazine exclusively on BookWalker weekly.

In predicting the sales for the game, PSX Extreme said "It's quite unfortunate if I do say so myself, because a AAA title like SSX Tricky won't be getting the sales it really deserves." [45] IGN called it the 95th best PlayStation 2 game. The staff cited its improvements over its predecessor (which includes "flashier Uber moves"). [46]

<i>IGN</i> American entertainment website

IGN is an American video game and entertainment media website operated by IGN Entertainment Inc., a subsidiary of Ziff Davis, itself wholly owned by j2 Global. The company is located in San Francisco's SOMA district and is headed by its former editor-in-chief, Peer Schneider. The IGN website was the brainchild of media entrepreneur Chris Anderson and launched on September 29, 1996. It focuses on games, films, television, comics, technology, and other media. Originally a network of desktop websites, IGN is now also distributed on mobile platforms, console programs on the Xbox and PlayStation, FireTV, Roku, and via YouTube, Twitch, Hulu, and Snapchat.

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