Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 2000

Last updated
Eurovision Song Contest 2000
CountryFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
National selection
Selection process Melodifestivalen 2000
Selection date(s)10 March 2000
Selected entrant Roger Pontare
Selected song"When Spirits Are Calling My Name"
Finals performance
Final result7th, 88 points
Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest
◄199920002001►

Sweden was the host of the Eurovision Song Contest 2000 thanks to Charlotte Nilsson's victory the previous year. Sveriges Television chose to hold the contest in Sweden's capital, Stockholm. They were represented by Roger Pontare with the song "When Spirits Are Calling My Name".

Contents

Before Eurovision

Melodifestivalen 2000

The entry of the home country was chosen in Melodifestivalen 2000. 1,394 songs were submitted and 10 progressed to the final, which was one of the most seen TV shows ever in Sweden with 4 175 000 viewers. Just like last year, 11 juries combined with televotes selected the winner, which surprisingly was folk-inspired rock song "När vindarna viskar mitt namn". It was sung by Roger Pontare, who had also represented Sweden at the 1994 contest. The song was written and composed by Thomas Holmstrand, Linda Jansson and Peter Dahl.

DrawArtistSongJuryTelevoteTotalPlace
1Guide"Vi lever här, vi lever nu"5344975
2Balsam Boys"Bara du och jag"4311547
3 Barbados "Se mig"58881462
4Avengers"När filmen är slut"00010
5Tom Nordahl"Alla änglar sjunger"320329
6 Roger Pontare "När vindarna viskar mitt namn"951322271
7 Javiera Muñoz "Varje timma, var minut"73661394
8Midnight Band"Tillsammans"580586
9 Hanna Hedlund "Anropar försvunnen"2522478
10 Friends "När jag tänker på i morgon"361101462

At Eurovision

Roger performed his song in 18th in the running order, following Croatia and preceding Macedonia, and received much cheers from the home public. The song had been translated into English and was now called "When Spirits Are Calling My Name", and the stage performance featured Native American and Sami themes. At the end of the voting, Sweden received 88 points (including 12 points from Turkey), finishing in 7th place which was enough to qualify them for the next contest as well. [1]

Voting

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Melodifestivalen 2000

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When Spirits Are Calling My Name

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Belgium was represented by Nathalie Sorce with the song '"Envie de vivre" at the 2000 Eurovision Song Contest, which took place in Stockholm on 13 May. Sorce was the winner of the Belgian national final for the contest, held in Brussels on 18 February.

The Netherlands was represented by Linda Wagenmakers, with the song '"No Goodbyes", at the 2000 Eurovision Song Contest, which took place in Stockholm on 13 May. Wagenmakers was the winner of the Dutch national final for the contest, held in Rotterdam on 27 February.

Germany was represented by Stefan Raab, with the song "Wadde hadde dudde da?", at the 2000 Eurovision Song Contest, which took place on 13 May in Stockholm. "Wadde hadde dudde da?" was the winner of the German national final, held on 18 February. Raab had been the composer of Germany's notorious 1998 Eurovision entry "Guildo hat euch lieb!"

Norway was represented by three-member girl group Charmed, with the song '"My Heart Goes Boom", at the 2000 Eurovision Song Contest, which took place on 13 May in Stockholm. "My Heart Goes Boom" was chosen as the Norwegian entry at the Melodi Grand Prix on 4 March.

Iceland was represented by August & Telma, with the song '"Tell Me!", at the 2000 Eurovision Song Contest, which took place on 13 May in Stockholm. "Tell Me!" was chosen as the Icelandic entry at the national final Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins on 26 February.

Latvia was represented by Brainstorm, with the song '"My Star", at the 2000 Eurovision Song Contest which took place on 13 May in Stockholm. "My Star" was chosen as the Latvian entry at the national final, Eirodziesma, on 26 February and marked Latvia's Eurovision debut, some years after fellow Baltic nations Estonia and Lithuania.

France was represented by Sofia Mestari, with the song '"On aura le ciel", at the 2000 Eurovision Song Contest, which took place on 13 May in Stockholm. This was the second year in which broadcaster France 3 had been in charge of the French participation, and as in 1999 they opted to choose their entry via public selection, with a national final being organised on 15 February 2000. However the poor result obtained by Nayah in 1999 followed by the even worse result in 2000, together with the controversy surrounding the 2000 selection process, led to France 3 changing to internal selection in the years following, initially with much greater success.

Croatia selected its entry for the 2000 Eurovision Song Contest through the "Dora 2000" national contest, which was organised by the Croatian national broadcaster Hrvatska radiotelevizija (HRT). The winner was Goran Karan with "Kad zaspu anđeli".

Turkey took part in the Eurovision Song Contest 2000. The country was represented by Pınar Ayhan and her group Grup S.O.S. with the song “Yorgunum Anla” written by Pınar Ayhan herself together with Sühan Ayhan and Orkun Yazgan. The entry was chosen by a professional jury. Although the song was originally in Turkish, during the contest it was sung partially in English.

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Malta competed in the Eurovision Song Contest 2000 in Stockholm, Sweden. The Maltese entry was selected through the Malta Song for Europe contest, where the winner was Claudette Pace with the song "Desire".

References

  1. "Final of Stockholm 2000". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  2. 1 2 "Results of the Final of Stockholm 2000". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.