Eurovision Song Contest 1999

Last updated
Eurovision Song Contest 1999
ESC 1999 logo.jpg
Dates
Final29 May 1999 (1999-05-29)
Host
Venue International Convention Center
Jerusalem, Israel
Presenter(s)
Directed byHagai Mautner
Executive supervisorChristine Marchal-Ortiz
Executive producerAmnon Barkai
Host broadcaster Israel Broadcasting Authority (IBA)
Opening actDigital animation "From Birmingham to Jerusalem" transitioning into a film about Jerusalem
Interval act"To Life" by Dafna Dekel & Sigal Shachmon"
"Freedom Calling", with the song "Free" performed in a medley with a version of a traditional prayer for freedom, "Dror Yikra" by Dana International
Reprise actAll acts performed the English version of "Hallelujah" as a tribute to the victims of the Balkan War
Website eurovision.tv/event/jerusalem-1999 OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
Participants
Number of entries23
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries
Non-returning countries
  • ESC 1999 Map.svg     Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1999
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8–1 points to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points None
Winning song
1998  Eurovision Song Contest  2000

The Eurovision Song Contest 1999 was the 44th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Jerusalem, Israel, following the country's victory at the 1998 contest with the song "Diva" by Dana International. It was the second time Israel had hosted the contest, having previously done so in 1979. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Israel Broadcasting Authority (IBA), the contest was held at the International Convention Center with the final on 29 May 1999. The live show was presented by Yigal Ravid, Dafna Dekel and Sigal Shachmon.

Contents

Twenty-three countries participated in the contest. It saw the return of Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Denmark and Iceland after being relegated from competing the previous year. Lithuania also returned to the contest, after their last participation in 1994. Finland, Greece, Macedonia, Romania, Slovakia and Switzerland were relegated due to having the lowest average scores over the previous five editions. Hungary decided not to participate, which left a spot open for Portugal, who otherwise would had been relegated from competing. Russia had intended to participate, but were not allowed to, due to not having broadcast the previous year's contest.

The winner was Sweden with the song "Take Me to Your Heaven", performed by Charlotte Nilsson, written by Gert Lengstrand and Marcos Ubeda, and composed by Lars Diedricson. This was Sweden's fourth victory in the contest, following their wins in 1974, 1984 and 1991. Iceland, Germany, Croatia and Israel rounded out the top five. Iceland achieved their best result in the contest at this point. Further down the table, Bosnia and Herzegovina also achieved their best result as an independent country at this point, finishing seventh.

Location

International Convention Center, Jerusalem - host venue of the 1999 contest. Binyanei-HaUmah.JPG
International Convention Center, Jerusalem – host venue of the 1999 contest.

In the run-up to the Contest, many speculated that it would not be held in Israel, but would be moved to either Malta or stay at the United Kingdom (the countries that completed the top 3 of the 1998 Contest). This came about after major concerns over funding for the event from the Israeli government arose, alongside the opposition from Orthodox Jews that they would attempt to stop the Contest from coming to Israel after Dana International won the previous year's Contest. This, however, provided no hindrance for IBA or to the organizing team of the event, and the Ussishkin Auditorium at International Convention Center in Jerusalem was selected as the venue for the 44th Contest. [1]

Format

Long-standing rules in place for decades were abolished during this Contest: rules that each country had to sing in one of their national languages was abolished for the first time since 1977. A majority of the participating countries, fourteen out of twenty-three, chose to sing entirely or partly in English and only eight entirely in their respective national languages; Lithuania, Spain, Croatia, Poland, France, Cyprus, Portugal and Turkey, not counting the United Kingdom, Ireland and Malta, who have English as a national or official language. Furthermore, live music became optional for the first time in the Contest's history. IBA took advantage of this and decided to drop the orchestra from the Contest as a way to conserve money for the show. This meant that for the first time all entries used backing track during their performances. [2] This caused controversy for Eurovision traditionalists, with two-time winner Johnny Logan criticising the move, describing the event now as "karaoke". [1]

Cover art for compilation CD ESC 1999 album cover.jpeg
Cover art for compilation CD

A compilation CD was released in Israel by the host broadcaster and IMP Records. Due to licensing problems, the CD omitted the songs from Poland, Cyprus, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom. [3] Since then, all compilation CDs have featured all the songs.

It was announced in 1999 that, as of the 2000 Contest, the four biggest financial contributors to the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) – Germany, Spain, France and the United Kingdom – would all be given automatic entry into the Contest, regardless of their average scores over the past five years. [1] [2]

Latvia had attempted to participate in the contest for the first time, but later withdrew. This gave Hungary a chance to enter the contest, however, Magyar Televízió decided not to take part, allowing Portugal to compete as the 23rd country. [2]

Draw for the order of performances took place on 17 November 1998. [4]

Lithuania returned to the contest for the first time in five years. The Lithuanian delegation had budget problems to contend with, and so the EBU allowed the Lithuanians to arrive in Israel a day later than everyone else. The first delegation on the other hand, to arrive were Estonia. [2]

Russia's Channel One had decided not to broadcast that year's contest, in order to allow for a strong comeback in Israel. However, as only countries which had broadcast the previous year's contest were allowed to enter the next year's contest, Russia was forced to miss another year.

The favourites to win the Contest came from Iceland's Selma with "All Out of Luck", and Cyprus's Marlain with "Tha 'Ne Erotas", after an internet poll by fans. But, while Iceland finished second to Sweden (the country's best showing in the contest), Cyprus failed to inspire televotes, finishing second last with only two points, both from the United Kingdom. [1] [2]

Television news anchor Yigal Ravid, singer and 1992 contestant Dafna Dekel and model/actress Sigal Shachmon presented the show, and it was the first time that three presenters were used to host the contest. Israel's two previous winners, Izhar Cohen, who won in 1978 with "A-Ba-Ni-Bi" and Milk and Honey's Gali Atari who won it the next year with "Hallelujah" attended as spectators.

Postcards

The postcards' theme was "interactive tour in the Land of the Bible". It featured paintings of biblical stories, "coming to life" with a humorous animation (created by cartoonist Yossi Abulafia), and then continuing to modern locations in Israel or modern themes that represent Israel's culture and industries. The various themes were as following, listed in appearance order:

  1. Flag of Lithuania (1988-2004).svg  LithuaniaJacob's Ladder / Israel Museum, Jerusalem
  2. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  BelgiumPharaoh & His Army / Eilat
  3. Flag of Spain.svg  SpainNoah's Ark / Landscapes of the Galilee
  4. Flag of Croatia.svg  CroatiaRuth / Israeli agriculture
  5. Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United KingdomJonah & The Whale / Jaffa
  6. Flag of Slovenia.svg  SloveniaAdam & Eve / Israeli fashion
  7. Flag of Turkey.svg  TurkeyThe Sea of Galilee / Tiberias and surroundings
  8. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway – Workers of the Tabernacle / Israeli high tech & virtual reality
  9. Flag of Denmark.svg  DenmarkJoseph & His Brothers / Haifa
  10. Flag of France.svg  FranceThe Golden Calf / Israeli jewellery industry
  11. Flag of the Netherlands.svg  NetherlandsThe Prophet / Tel Aviv nightlife
  12. Flag of Poland.svg  PolandDavid & Goliath / Israeli sports
  13. Flag of Iceland.svg  IcelandThe Manna from Heaven / Israeli culinary
  14. Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  CyprusThe Basket of Moses / Rafting on the Jordan River
  15. Flag of Sweden.svg  SwedenDavid & Bathsheba / Music and art on the roofs of Tel Aviv
  16. Flag of Portugal.svg  PortugalDaniel & The Lions / Acre
  17. Flag of Ireland.svg  IrelandCain & Abel / Judaean Desert
  18. Flag of Austria.svg  AustriaThe Judgement of Solomon / Jerusalem
  19. Flag of Israel.svg  IsraelThe Promised Land / Jezreel Valley
  20. Flag of Malta.svg  MaltaDavid & Michal / Suzanne Dellal Centre for Dance and Theatre, Tel Aviv
  21. Flag of Germany.svg  GermanyThe Tower of Babel / Israeli beach
  22. Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and HerzegovinaSamson / Caesarea National Park
  23. Flag of Estonia.svg  EstoniaThe Zodiac mosaic at the Old Beth Alfa Synagogue / Love at the Dead Sea

Incidents

A number of controversies occurred before the Contest. Two songs selected to compete in Israel were found to be ineligible: Bosnia and Herzegovina's Hari Mata Hari were disqualified after their entry was discovered to have been released in Finland some years previously; Germany's Corinna May was also disqualified after her song was revealed to have been released in 1997 by a different singer. [1] [5] Both artists would eventually represent their countries in Eurovision, in 2006 and 2002 respectively.

Croatia's entry, Marija Magdalena, attracted objections from the Norwegian delegation, due to synthesised male vocals being used on the backing track of Doris Dragović's entry. The EBU decided to reduce the country's score by a third for the purpose of calculating its five-year average to determine participation in future contests, though it was decided to leave its placement in the 1999 result unaffected. [1] [2]

The interval act was provided by Dana International, who performed a cover of the Stevie Wonder song "Free", which although was a smash hit in Israel at the time, caused some controversy there due to the song's lyrics. Dana International also appeared at the end of the show, handing the winning trophy to Nilsson. After pretending that the trophy was too heavy to lift, she fell to the stage, bringing down the winning composers with her. [1] [2] After the encore of the winning entry coming from Sweden, the three presenters re-appeared inviting everyone on stage to sing a rendition of the English version of "Hallelujah", the Israeli winner from the 1979 Contest, as a tribute to the victims of the Kosovo War (particularly then-Yugoslavia, which was banned from participation as penalty due this conflict), who were unable to view the contest after bombings destroyed television transmitters. [1]

Returning artists

Lead artists

ArtistCountryPrevious Year(s)
Doris Dragović Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 1986 (for Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia)
Evelin Samuel (along with Camille)Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 1997 (as a backing singer for Maarja-Liis Ilus)
Darja Švajger Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 1995

Backing performers [6]

ArtistCountryPrevious Year(s)
Chris and Moira Flag of Malta.svg  Malta 1994
Gabriel Forss Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1997 (as a member of Blond)
Stefán Hilmarsson Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 1988 (as a member of Beathoven) and 1991 (with Eyjólfur Kristjánsson)
Kenny Lübcke Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1992 (with Lotte Nilsson)
Linda Williams Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 1981 (for the Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands).

Results

DrawCountryArtistSongLanguage [7] [8] Place [9] Points
01Flag of Lithuania (1988-2004).svg  Lithuania Aistė "Strazdas" Samogitian 2013
02Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Vanessa Chinitor "Like the Wind" English 1238
03Flag of Spain.svg  Spain Lydia "No quiero escuchar" Spanish 231
04Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia Doris Dragović "Marija Magdalena" Croatian 4118
05Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom Precious "Say It Again"English1238
06Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia Darja Švajger "For a Thousand Years"English1150
07Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey Tuğba Önal & Grup Mistik"Dön Artık" Turkish 1621
08Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Stig Van Eijk "Living My Life Without You"English1435
09Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Trine Jepsen & Michael Teschl "This Time I Mean It"English871
10Flag of France.svg  France Nayah "Je veux donner ma voix" French 1914
11Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Marlayne "One Good Reason"English871
12Flag of Poland.svg  Poland Mietek Szcześniak"Przytul mnie mocno" Polish 1817
13Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Selma "All Out of Luck"English2146
14Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus Marlain "Tha'nai Erotas" (Θα'ναι έρωτας) Greek 222
15Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Charlotte Nilsson "Take Me to Your Heaven"English1163
16Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal Rui Bandeira "Como tudo começou" Portuguese 2112
17Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland The Mullans"When You Need Me"English1718
18Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Bobbie Singer "Reflection"English1065
19Flag of Israel.svg  Israel Eden "Yom Huledet (Happy Birthday)" (יום הולדת)English, Hebrew 593
20Flag of Malta.svg  Malta Times Three "Believe 'n Peace"English1532
21Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Sürpriz "Reise nach Jerusalem – Kudüs'e seyahat" German, Turkish, English [lower-alpha 1] 3140
22Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina Dino & Béatrice "Putnici" Bosnian, French786
23Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia Evelin Samuel & Camille"Diamond of Night"English690

Voting structure

Each country had a televote, where the top ten most voted-for songs were awarded the 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 points, with the exceptions of Turkey, Lithuania, Ireland and Bosnia and Herzegovina who used juries.[ citation needed ]

Scoreboard

Voting results [10]
Voting procedure used:
  100% Televoting
  100% Jury vote
Total score
Lithuania
Belgium
Spain
Croatia
United Kingdom
Slovenia
Turkey
Norway
Denmark
France
Netherlands
Poland
Iceland
Cyprus
Sweden
Portugal
Ireland
Austria
Israel
Malta
Germany
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Estonia
Contestants
Lithuania1325312
Belgium38421021055
Spain11
Croatia1186512128717421668751083
United Kingdom385452414481
Slovenia5010221216125
Turkey214512
Norway35767753
Denmark7155511288375246
France142282
Netherlands714123835764214624
Poland17746
Iceland1468810101010127412124421010310
Cyprus22
Sweden16337612761210386106105681221212
Portugal1212
Ireland1812411
Austria656746323817558
Israel933881322104101103816724
Malta3266317171
Germany140107316123581212521210123107
Bosnia and Herzegovina861101077863536128
Estonia9014138544582107831763

12 points

Below is a summary of all 12 point in the final:

N.ContestantNation(s) giving 12 points
5Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Flag of Israel.svg  Israel, Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands, Flag of Poland.svg  Poland, Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal, Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina, Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia, Flag of Malta.svg  Malta, Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom
3Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus, Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark, Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
2Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia, Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia, Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland
1Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland
Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland Flag of Lithuania (1988-2004).svg  Lithuania
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal Flag of France.svg  France
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey Flag of Germany.svg  Germany

Qualification for the 2000 contest

In addition to Sweden, the host country of the 2000 contest, and the "Big Four", the 13 countries with the highest average scores between 1995 and 1999 were allowed to take part in the Eurovision Song Contest 2000 alongside new or returning countries. [11]

Table key

  Automatically qualified
  Qualified
RankCountryAverageYearly Scores
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
1Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 116.80767722716638
2Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 115.338117293
3Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 90.401001003653163
4Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 89.00441621576418
5Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 84.6091982413179 [lower-alpha 2]
6Flag of Malta.svg  Malta 81.4076686616532
7Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 76.0078515071
8Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 75.5094823690
9Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 75.2014811407935
10Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 62.67922571
11Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 62.2512286140
12Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 61.50315118146
13Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus 57.60797298372
14Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 53.0067681265
15Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 50.801191796211
16Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 49.0021571212521
17Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 47.5082212238
18Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 45.408416601750
19Flag of France.svg  France 44.80941895314
20Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 33.7514132286
21Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 29.0059203612
22Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 27.201531541917
23Flag of Lithuania (1988-2004).svg  Lithuania 13.0013

International broadcasts and voting

Voting and spokespersons

The spokespersons announced the score from their respective country's televote (or, in some cases, national jury) in running order.

  1. Flag of Lithuania (1988-2004).svg  LithuaniaAndrius Tapinas
  2. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium – Sabine De Vos [13]
  3. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain – Hugo de Campos
  4. Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia – Marko Rašica [14]
  5. Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United KingdomColin Berry
  6. Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia – Mira Berginc
  7. Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey – Osman Erkan
  8. Flag of Norway.svg  Norway – Ragnhild Sælthun Fjørtoft
  9. Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark – Kirsten Siggaard (Danish representative in 1984, 1985 and 1988 as member of Hot Eyes) [15]
  10. Flag of France.svg  FranceMarie Myriam (Winner of the 1977 contest) [16]
  11. Flag of the Netherlands.svg  NetherlandsEdsilia Rombley (Dutch representative in 1998 and 2007; host in 2021)
  12. Flag of Poland.svg  Poland – Jan Chojnacki
  13. Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland – Áslaug Dóra Eyjólfsdóttir
  14. Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus – Marina Maleni [17]
  15. Flag of Sweden.svg  SwedenPontus Gårdinger [18]
  16. Flag of Portugal.svg  PortugalManuel Luís Goucha [19]
  17. Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland – Clare McNamara
  18. Flag of Austria.svg  Austria – Dodo Roščić
  19. Flag of Israel.svg  Israel – Yoav Ginai (Winner of the 1998 contest, as lyricist) [20]
  20. Flag of Malta.svg  Malta – Nirvana Azzopardi
  21. Flag of Germany.svg  GermanyRenan Demirkan
  22. Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina – Segmedina Srna
  23. Flag of Estonia.svg  EstoniaMart Sander [21]

Commentators

Most countries sent commentators to Jerusalem or commented from their own country, in order to add insight to the participants and, if necessary, the provision of voting information.

Participating countries

Non-participating countries

Radio commentators

The participating countries that provided radio broadcasts for the event are listed below.

Notes and references

Notes

  1. Contains some words in Hebrew
  2. Croatia's score from the 1999 contest was reduced by 33% for the purposes of determining average scores due to the use of synthesised pre-recorded vocals in that year's Croatian entry. [12]

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The Eurovision Young Musicians 2012 was the sixteenth edition of the Eurovision Young Musicians, held at the Rathausplatz in Vienna, Austria on 11 May 2012. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Österreichischer Rundfunk (ORF), musicians from seven countries participated in the televised final. This was the fourth time that the competition was held on an open-air stage and during the annual Vienna Festival. Austria and broadcaster ORF previously hosted the contest in 1990, 1998, 2006, 2008 and 2010.

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