Eurovision Song Contest 1983

Last updated
Eurovision Song Contest 1983
ESC 1983 logo.png
Dates
Final23 April 1983
Host
Venue Rudi-Sedlmayer-Halle
Munich, West Germany
Presenter(s) Marlene Charell
Musical directorDieter Reith
Directed byRainer Bertram
Executive supervisorFrank Naef
Executive producer
  • Christian Hayer
  • Günther Lebram
Host broadcaster Arbeitsgemeinschaft Rundfunkanstalten Deutschland (ARD)
Bayerischer Rundfunk (BR)
Opening actMarlene Charell introducing each act and calling all of them on stage together.
Interval actClassical music films medley performed by Marlene Charell.
Website eurovision.tv/event/munich-1983 OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
Participants
Number of entries20
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries
Non-returning countriesFlag of Ireland.svg  Ireland
  • ESC 1983 Map.svg
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1983
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points
Winning songFlag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg
"Si la vie est cadeau"
1982  Eurovision Song Contest  1984

The Eurovision Song Contest 1983 was the 28th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It was held in Munich, then West Germany, following the country's victory at the 1982 contest with the song "Ein bißchen Frieden" by Nicole. This was the second time Germany hosted the competition, having previously done so in 1957. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcasters Arbeitsgemeinschaft Rundfunkanstalten Deutschland (ARD) and Bayerischer Rundfunk (BR), the contest was held at the Rudi-Sedlmayer-Halle on Saturday 23 April 1983 and was hosted by Marlene Charell.

Contents

Twenty countries took part in the contest. Though France and Greece had not participated the previous year, they returned for 1983. Italy that not participated the two previous years, also returned. Ireland that had participated the previous year, was absent this year.

The winner was Luxembourg with the song "Si la vie est cadeau" by Corinne Hermes. This was Luxembourg's fifth victory in the contest which equalled the record set by France in 1977. It was also the second year in a row where the winning entry was performed last on the night and the second year in a row in which Israel won 2nd place. For the third year in a row, at least one country ended up with nul points, and in this case, it happened to be two countries, Spain and Turkey, neither of whom were able to get off the mark.

The 1983 contest was the first to be televised in Australia, via Channel 0/28 (now SBS Television) in Sydney and Melbourne. The contest went on to become a very popular show in Australia, leading to the country's debut at the 60th anniversary contest in 2015.

Location

Rudi-Sedlmayer-Halle, Munich - host venue of the 1983 contest. Rudi-Sedlmayer-Halle 0499.JPG
Rudi-Sedlmayer-Halle, Munich – host venue of the 1983 contest.

Munich is a German city and capital of the Bavarian state. As the capital, Munich houses the parliament and state government. Rudi-Sedlmayer-Halle was chosen to host the contest. It was initially named after the president of the Bavarian State Sport Association. The 6,700-seat hall opened in 1972 to host basketball events for the 1972 Summer Olympics.

Format

Stage design

The set that year was a quite small, arc-shaped stage surrounding the orchestra section, and a large background resembling giant electric heaters, which lit up in different sequences and combinations depending on the nature and rhythm of the songs.

Presentation format

Hostess Marlene Charell made all of her announcements in German before translating a repetition in both French and English. After presenting all of the 20 participating acts at the start of the show and then making a formal welcome, Charell also introduced each song individually, standing in front of elaborate floral arrangements, all of which she had designed herself, in place of a pre-filmed 'postcard'. In all three languages, Charel named the country, song title, performing artist, author, composer and conductor. Together with an on screen title card naming the upcoming country prior to her verbal introductions, this extended the break in between each song to three minutes minimally.

Due to host Marlene Charell's choice to announce points in three languages instead of two, the voting went on for nearly an hour, stretching the Eurovision contest past three hours for the second time ever, after 1979. [1] In addition, Charell made 13 language mistakes throughout the voting, [1] some as innocuous as mixing up the words for "points" between the three languages, some as major as nearly awarding points to "Schweden" (Sweden) that were meant for "Schweiz" (Switzerland).

The language problems also occurred during the contest introductions, as Charell introduced the Finnish singer Ami Aspelund as "Ami Aspesund", furthermore she introduced the Norwegian conductor Sigurd Jansen as "...Johannes...Skorgan...", [2] having been forced to make up a name on the spot after forgetting the conductor's name.

Interval act

The interval show was a dance number set to a medley of German songs which had become internationally famous, including "Strangers in the Night". The host, Marlene Charell, was the lead dancer.

Song success

Ofra Haza from Israel, who took the second place, had an enduring success with her song "Hi" (חי) which became a hit in Europe, launching her career. This year also marked the first performance of Sweden's Carola Häggkvist, who took the third place, went on to win the contest in 1991 and represented her country again in 2006 (coming fifth). Her song, "Främling", became very popular in Sweden and in various other European countries. In the Netherlands, the song reached the top five, coupled with a Dutch-language version ("Je ogen hebben geen geheimen") which was performed by Carola herself. The 4th placed "Džuli", also became a hit in Europe. Singer Daniel released an English-language version as "Julie".

Voting

Each country had a jury who awarded 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 point(s) to their top ten songs.

Nul points

This year's nul points were shared by Spain and Turkey. Spain's Remedios Amaya presented a song which was a stark departure from pop tastes and conventional perception of melody and harmony as it was a flamenco one, a style traditionally tied with the international image of Spain. Additionally, she sang her song barefoot. Some olés were heard from the present audience when she ended her performance. Turkey's entry, Opera, performed by Çetin Alp & the Short Waves, could on the other hand be said to fit in well with the spirit of Eurovision of that time. Nevertheless, the overinterpretation of the theme of the song, as well as the fact that the lyrics of the song consisted for the most part of the often-repeated word "opera" and names of well-known operas and composers, and Çetin's breaking into operatic "lay lay la", prompted extensive derision of the song, including the usual sardonic words from BBC commentator Terry Wogan ("a nicely understated performance there").

Conductors

Returning artists

ArtistCountryPrevious year(s)
Guy Bonnet Flag of France.svg  France 1970
Sandra Reemer (backing singer)Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1972 (along with Andres Holten), 1976, 1979 (as Xandra)
Jahn Teigen Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1978, 1982
Anita Skorgan (backing singer) 1977, 1979, 1982
Izolda Barudžija (backing singer)Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 1982 (part of Aska)

Results

DrawCountryArtistSongLanguage [4] [5] Place [6] Points
01Flag of France.svg  France Guy Bonnet "Vivre" French 856
02Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Jahn Teigen "Do Re Mi" Norwegian 953
03Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom Sweet Dreams "I'm Never Giving Up" English 679
04Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Carola Häggkvist "Främling" Swedish 3126
05Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Riccardo Fogli "Per Lucia" Italian 1141
06Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey Çetin Alp & the Short Waves "Opera" Turkish 190
07Flag of Spain.svg  Spain Remedios Amaya "¿Quién maneja mi barca?" Spanish 190
08Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Mariella Farré "Io così non ci sto"Italian1528
09Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Ami Aspelund "Fantasiaa" Finnish 1141
10Flag of Greece.svg  Greece Christie Stasinopoulou "Mou les" (Μου λες) Greek 1432
11Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Bernadette "Sing Me a Song" Dutch 766
12Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Daniel "Džuli" (Џули) Serbo-Croatian 4125
13Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus Stavros & Constantina "I agapi akoma zi" (Η αγάπη ακόμα ζει)Greek1626
14Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Hoffmann & Hoffmann "Rücksicht" German 594
15Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Gry Johansen "Kloden drejer" Danish 1716
16Flag of Israel.svg  Israel Ofra Haza "Hi" (חי) Hebrew 2136
17Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal Armando Gama "Esta balada que te dou" Portuguese 1333
18Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Westend "Hurricane"German953
19Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Pas de Deux "Rendez-vous"Dutch1813
20Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg Corinne Hermès "Si la vie est cadeau"French1142

Scoreboard

Voting results [7]
Total score
France
Norway
United Kingdom
Sweden
Italy
Turkey
Spain
Switzerland
Finland
Greece
Netherlands
Yugoslavia
Cyprus
Germany
Denmark
Israel
Portugal
Austria
Belgium
Luxembourg
Contestants
France5631010672344133
Norway5353681846372
United Kingdom795512258556352106
Sweden12661288725101031712108485
Italy417243128167
Turkey0
Spain0
Switzerland281717615
Finland411263487721
Greece32312512
Netherlands6627164212355243424
Yugoslavia1258121121012678612101128
Cyprus264165154
Germany94101078624110387612
Denmark1627142
Israel1368610536773121010710121010
Portugal3341562627
Austria533451044436253
Belgium13481
Luxembourg1421210128738121121082121258

12 points

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N.ContestantNation(s) giving 12 points
6Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg Flag of France.svg  France, Flag of Greece.svg  Greece, Flag of Israel.svg  Israel, Flag of Italy.svg  Italy, Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal, Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia
5Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium, Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark, Flag of Finland.svg  Finland, Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey, Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom
2Flag of Greece.svg  Greece Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus, Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel Flag of Austria.svg  Austria, Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Flag of Germany.svg  Germany, Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden

Commentators

Television

Participating countries

Non-participating countries

Radio

Participating countries

Some participating countries did not provide radio broadcasts for the event; the ones who did are listed below.

Non-participating countries

Spokespersons

Each country announced their votes in the order of performance. The following is a list of spokespersons who announced the votes for their respective country. [23]

National jury members

Incidents

Ireland absence

Ireland was not in the contest because RTÉ was in strike action at that time. [30]

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