Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest

Last updated
Switzerland
Flag of Switzerland.svg
Member station SRG SSR
National selection events
National final
  • Concours Eurovision
  • 1956–1957
  • 1959–1961
  • 1963–1970
  • 1972–1993
  • 1998
  • 2000
  • 2002
  • 2004
  • Die Grosse Entscheidungsshow
  • 2011–2018
Internal selection
  • 1958
  • 1962
  • 1971
  • 1994
  • 1996–1997
  • 2005–2010
  • 2019–2021
Participation summary
Appearances61 (50 finals)
First appearance 1956
Best result1st: 1956, 1988
Nul points 1964, 1967, 1998, 2004 SF
External links
SF page
Switzerland's page at Eurovision.tv
Song contest current event.png For the most recent participation see
Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2021

Switzerland has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 61 times since making its debut at the first contest in 1956, missing only four contests, in 1995, 1999, 2001 and 2003. Switzerland hosted the first contest in 1956 in Lugano, and won it. Switzerland won the contest again in 1988, with the 1989 contest being held in Lausanne.

Contents

Lys Assia won the first contest in 1956 with the song "Refrain". She returned to place second in 1958. Switzerland would go on to finish second with Esther Ofarim (1963) and Daniela Simmons (1986) and third with Franca Di Rienzo (1961) and Arlette Zola (1982), before winning the contest for the second time in 1988 with Celine Dion and the song "Ne partez pas sans moi". Annie Cotton gave the country its 15th top five result in 1993, when she placed third.

Since the introduction of the semi-final round in 2004, Switzerland have failed to reach the final in 11 of 17 contests. Switzerland returned to the top five for the first time in 26 years when Luca Hänni gave the country its 16th top five result by finishing fourth in 2019, followed by their 17th top five finish, when Gjon's Tears placed third in 2021.

Absences

Switzerland had been absent from Eurovision four times since their participation began in the first contest. These absences, in 1995, 1999, 2001 and 2003 were caused by poor results in previous contests that relegated Switzerland from the contest. [1] [2] [3] [4]

National selections

A mix of different selection processes have been used to determine Switzerland's entry in each year's contest. Since 2019, SRG SSR has used an internal selection process, although televised national finals were used in previous years, held under various names including Concours Eurovision from the 1950s to 2000s, and Die Grosse Entscheidungsshow between 2011 and 2018. In the 1980s, the Swiss national finals tended to have ten participating songs each year: three in French, three in German, three in Italian and one in Romansch.

Contestants

Switzerland has four official languages, French, German, Italian, and Romansh. For decades, the song requirements stated that the song had to be performed in a national language, which gave Switzerland leeway as they could perform in any of the four languages. Out of their 60 appearances in the contest, Switzerland has sent 61 songs, 24 of which were in French, 12 in German, 15 in English, 10 in Italian and 1 in Romansh. Both of Switzerland's winning songs have been sung in French.

Table key
1
Winner
2
Second place
3
Third place
Last place
X
Entry selected but did not compete
YearArtistTitleLanguageFinalPointsSemiPoints
Lys Assia "Das alte Karussell" German 2 [lower-alpha 1] N/ANo semi-finals
Lys Assia"Refrain" French 1
Lys Assia"L'enfant que j'étais"French85
Lys Assia"Giorgio"German, Italian 224
Christa Williams "Irgendwoher"German414
Anita Traversi "Cielo e terra"Italian85
Franca Di Rienzo "Nous aurons demain"French316
Jean Philippe "Le retour"French102
Esther Ofarim "T'en va pas"French240
Anita Traversi "I miei pensieri"Italian13 ◁0
Yovanna "Non, à jamais sans toi"French88
Madeleine Pascal "Ne vois-tu pas?"French612
Géraldine "Quel cœur vas-tu briser?"French17 ◁0
Gianni Mascolo "Guardando il sole"Italian132
Paola del Medico "Bonjour, Bonjour"German [lower-alpha 2] 513
Henri Dès "Retour"French48
Peter, Sue and Marc "Les illusions de nos vingt ans"French1278
Véronique Müller "C'est la chanson de mon amour"French888
Patrick Juvet "Je vais me marier, Marie"French1279
Piera Martell "Mein Ruf nach Dir"German14 ◁3
Simone Drexel "Mikado"German677
Peter, Sue and Marc"Djambo, Djambo" English 491
Pepe Lienhard Band "Swiss Lady"German671
Carole Vinci"Vivre"French965
Peter, Sue and Marc + Pfuri, Gorps and Kniri "Trödler und Co"German1060
Paola del Medico"Cinéma"French4104
Peter, Sue and Marc"Io senza te"Italian4121
Arlette Zola "Amour on t'aime"French397
Mariella Farré "Io così non ci sto"Italian1528
Rainy Day"Welche Farbe hat der Sonnenschein?"German1630
Mariella Farré and Pino Gasparini"Piano, piano"German1239
Daniela Simmons "Pas pour moi"French2140
Carol Rich "Moitié, moitié"French1726
Céline Dion "Ne partez pas sans moi"French1137
Furbaz "Viver senza tei" Romansh 1347
Egon Egemann "Musik klingt in die Welt hinaus"German1151
Sandra Simó "Canzone per te"Italian5118
Daisy Auvray"Mister Music Man"French1532
Annie Cotton "Moi, tout simplement"French3148 Kvalifikacija za Millstreet
Duilio "Sto pregando"Italian1915No semi-finals
Kathy Leander "Mon cœur l'aime"French1622867
Barbara Berta"Dentro di me"Italian225No semi-finals
Gunvor "Lass ihn"German25 ◁0
Jane Bogaert"La vita cos'è?"Italian2014
Francine Jordi "Dans le jardin de mon âme"French2215
Piero and the MusicStars"Celebrate"EnglishFailed to qualify22 ◁0
Vanilla Ninja "Cool Vibes"English81288114
six4one "If We All Give a Little"English1630Top 11 previous year [lower-alpha 3]
DJ BoBo "Vampires Are Alive"EnglishFailed to qualify2040
Paolo Meneguzzi "Era stupendo"Italian1347
Lovebugs "The Highest Heights"English1415
Michael von der Heide "Il pleut de l'or"French17 ◁2
Anna Rossinelli "In Love for a While"English25 ◁191055
Sinplus "Unbreakable"EnglishFailed to qualify1145
Takasa "You and Me"English1341
Sebalter "Hunter of Stars"English1364492
Mélanie René "Time to Shine"EnglishFailed to qualify17 ◁4
Rykka "The Last of Our Kind"English18 ◁28
Timebelle "Apollo"English1297
Zibbz "Stones"English1386
Luca Hänni "She Got Me"English43644232
Gjon's Tears "Répondez-moi"FrenchContest cancelled [lower-alpha 4] X
Gjon's Tears "Tout l'univers"French34321291
1. ^ Contains some words in French.

Congratulations: 50 Years of the Eurovision Song Contest

ArtistLanguageTitleAt CongratulationsAt Eurovision
FinalPointsSemiPointsYearPlacePoints
Celine Dion French "Ne partez pas sans moi"Failed to qualify1098 1988 1137

Hostings

YearLocationVenuePresenter(s)
1956 Lugano Teatro Kursaal Lohengrin Filipello
1989 Lausanne Palais de Beaulieu Lolita Morena and Jacques Deschenaux

Awards

Marcel Bezençon Awards

YearCategorySongComposer(s)
lyrics (l) / music (m)
PerformerFinalPointsHost cityRef.
2021 Composer Award"Tout l'univers"Gjon Muharremaj, Xavier Michel, Wouter Hardy & Nina Sampermans (m & l) Gjon's Tears 3432 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Rotterdam
[5]

Conductors

YearConductor [lower-alpha 5] Musical DirectorNotesRef.
1956 Fernando Paggi [lower-alpha 6] [6]
1957 Flag of Germany.svg Willy Berking N/A [lower-alpha 7]
1958 Paul Burkhard
1959 Flag of France.svg Franck Pourcel [lower-alpha 8]
1960 Cédric Dumont
1961 Fernando Paggi
1962 Cédric Dumont
1963 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Eric Robinson [lower-alpha 9]
1964 Fernando Paggi
1965 Mario Robbiani
1966 Flag of Luxembourg.svg Jean Roderes [lower-alpha 10]
1967 Hans Moeckel
1968 Mario Robbiani
1969 Flag of Germany.svg Henry Mayer
1970 Flag of France.svg Bernard Gérard [7]
1971 Hardy Schneiders
1972 Flag of France.svg Jean-Pierre Festi
1973 Flag of France.svg Hervé Roy
1974 Flag of Germany.svg Pepe Ederer
1975 Peter Jacques
1976 Mario Robbiani
1977 Peter Jacques
1978 Flag of France.svg Daniel Janin
1979 Flag of Germany.svg Rolf Zuckowski
1980 Peter Reber [8]
1981 Flag of Germany.svg Rolf Zuckowski
1982 Flag of Spain.svg Joan Amils
1983 Robert Weber [lower-alpha 11]
1984 Mario Robbiani
1985 Anita Kerr
1986 Flag of Turkey.svg Flag of Switzerland.svg Atilla Şereftuğ
1987 No conductor
1988 Flag of Turkey.svg Flag of Switzerland.svg Atilla Şereftuğ
1989 Flag of France.svg Benoît Kaufman [lower-alpha 12]
1990 Bela BalintN/A
1991 Flag of Italy.svg Flaviano Cuffari
1992 Roby Seidel
1993 Marc Sorrentino
1994 Flag of Italy.svg Valeriano Chiaravalle
1996 Flag of Portugal.svg Flag of Switzerland.svg Rui dos Reis
1997 Flag of Italy.svg Pietro Damiani
1998 No conductor

Commentators and spokespersons

Over the years Switzerland has broadcast the Eurovision Song Contest on three television stations, SRF (German language), RTS (French language) and RSI (Italian language).

YearCommentatorSpokespersonRef.
SRF RTS RSI
1956 No broadcastRobert BurnierNo broadcastNo spokesperson
1957 Commentary via RTF FranceMäni Weber
1958 Theodor Haller
1959 Boris Acquadro
1960
1961
1962 Commentary via RAI ItalyAlexandre Burger
1963 Georges Hardy
1964 Robert Burnier
1965 Jean Charles
1966 Georges HardyGiovanni Bertini
1967 Robert Burnier
1968 Georges Hardy
1969
1970
1971 No spokesperson
1972
1973
1974 Michel Stocker
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979 Max Rüeger
1980 Theodor Haller
1981
1982
1983
1984 Bernard ThurnheerSerge MoissonEzio Guidi
1985
1986
1987 Wilma Gilardi
1988 Ezio Guidi
1989 Thierry MasselotGiovanni Bertini
1990 Emanuela Gaggini
1991 Lolita Morena
1992 Mariano TschuorIvan Frésard
1993 Jean-Marc Richard
1994 Wilma Gilardi Sandra Studer
1995 Heinz MargotJoanne HolderDid not participate
1996 Sandra StuderPierre GrandjeanYves Ménestrier
1997 Heinz Margot, Roman KilchspergerJonathan TedescoSandy Altermatt
1998 Jean-Marc Richard Regula Elsener
1999 Sandra StuderDid not participate
2000 Astrid Von Stockar
2001 Phil MundwillerDid not participate
2002 Jonathan Tedesco, Claudio LazzarinoDiana Jörg
2003 Roman KilchspergerJean-Marc Richard, Alain Morisod Daniele Rauseo, Claudio LazzarinoDid not participate
2004 Marco FritscheDaniela Tami, Claudio Lazzarino Emel Aykanat
2005 Sandra StuderJean-Marc Richard, Marie-Thérèse PorchetCécile Bähler
2006 Jean-Marc Richard, Alain MorisodSandy Altermatt, Claudio LazzarinoJubaira Bachmann
2007 Bernard ThurnheerJean-Marc Richard (all), Henri Dès (final),
Nicolas Tanner (semi-final)
Sven Epiney
2008 Sven EpineyJean-Marc Richard, Nicolas TannerSandy AltermattCécile Bähler
2009
2010 Christa Rigozzi
2011 Jonathan TedescoCécile Bähler
2012 Clarissa Tami, Paolo Meneguzzi Sara Hildebrand
2013 Alessandro BertoglioMélanie Freymond
2014 Sven Epiney, Peter Schneider, Gabriel VetterAlessandro Bertoglio, Sandy AltermattKurt Aeschbacher
2015 Clarissa Tami, Paolo Meneguzzi Laetitia Guarino
2016 Clarissa Tami, Michele Carobbio Sebalter
2017 Sven Epiney (all); Stefan Büsser, Micky Beisenherz (final)Clarissa Tami (all); Sebalter (final) Luca Hänni
2018 Sven EpineyClarissa Tami, SebalterLetícia Carvalho
2019 Jean-Marc Richard, Nicolas Tanner (all);
Bastian Baker (final)
Sinplus
2021 Jean-Marc Richard, Nicolas Tanner (all);
Joseph Gorgoni (final)
Clarissa Tami (2nd semi-final and final);
Sebalter (final)
Angélique Beldner [20] [21] [22] [23] [24]

See also

Notes

  1. The full results for the first contest in 1956 are unknown, as only the winner was announced. The official Eurovision site lists all other songs as being placed second.
  2. Contains some words in French.
  3. According to the then-Eurovision rules, the top ten non-Big Four countries from the previous year along with the Big Four automatically qualified for the grand final without having to compete in semi-finals. For example, if Germany and France placed inside the top ten, the 11th and 12th spots were advanced to the next year's grand final along with all countries ranked in the top ten.
  4. The 2020 contest was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  5. All conductors are of Swiss nationality unless otherwise noted.
  6. Also conducted the Dutch and German entries.
  7. Host conductor
  8. Host conductor
  9. Host conductor
  10. Host conductor
  11. Conducted at the national final by Hans Moeckel
  12. Also conducted the Luxembourgish entry and half of the Danish entry.

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Switzerland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2018. The Swiss German speaking broadcaster Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen (SRF) in collaboration with the other broadcasters part of the Swiss Broadcasting Corporation organised a national final in order to select the Swiss entry for the 2018 contest in Lisbon, Portugal.

Switzerland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019. The Swiss Broadcasting Corporation organised an internal selection in order to select the Swiss entry for the 2019 contest in Tel Aviv, Israel.

References

  1. "History by Year: Eurovision Song Contest 1995". EBU. Archived from the original on 2011-02-17. Retrieved 2009-04-15.
  2. "History by Year: Eurovision Song Contest 1999". EBU. Archived from the original on 2011-02-17. Retrieved 2009-04-15.
  3. "History by Year: Eurovision Song Contest 2001". EBU. Archived from the original on 2011-02-17. Retrieved 2009-04-15.
  4. "History by Year: Eurovision Song Contest 2003". EBU. Archived from the original on 2011-02-17. Retrieved 2009-04-15.
  5. https://eurovision.tv/live-blog-grand-final-2021/snippet/the-marcel-bezencon-award
  6. Roxburgh, Gordon (2012). Songs for Europe: The United Kingdom at the Eurovision Song Contest. Volume One: The 1950s and 1960s. Prestatyn: Telos Publishing. pp. 93–101. ISBN   978-1-84583-065-6.|volume= has extra text (help)
  7. Roxburgh, Gordon (2014). Songs for Europe: The United Kingdom at the Eurovision Song Contest. Volume Two: The 1970s. Prestatyn: Telos Publishing. pp. 142–168. ISBN   978-1-84583-093-9.|volume= has extra text (help)
  8. Roxburgh, Gordon (2016). Songs for Europe: The United Kingdom at the Eurovision Song Contest. Volume Three: The 1980s. Prestatyn: Telos Publishing. ISBN   978-1-84583-118-9.|volume= has extra text (help)
  9. ""ESC" 2017: Satirischer Kommentar mit Stefan Büsser und "Aeschbacher Spezial – aus Kiew"" [«ESC» 2017: Satirical commentary with Stefan Büsser and «Aeschbacher Special - from Kyiv»]. SRF (in German). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  10. "Eurovision Song Contest 2017". RSI (in Italian). Archived from the original on 7 May 2017. Retrieved 27 February 2017.
  11. Davies, Megan (1 May 2017). "Switzerland: Luca Hänni Announced As Spokesperson". Eurovoix. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  12. Granger, Anthony (16 April 2018). "Switzerland: Sven Epiney Returns to the Commentary Booth". Eurovoix. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  13. "Eurosong - TV - Play RTS". RTS (in French). Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  14. "Eurovision Song Contest 2018 - RSI Radiotelevisione svizzera". RSI (in Italian). 7 May 2018. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  15. Granger, Anthony (19 April 2018). "Switzerland: Leticia Carvalho Revealed as Spokesperson". Eurovoix. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  16. Granger, Anthony (16 April 2019). "Switzerland: Sven Epiney Confirmed as SRF's Eurovision Commentator". Eurovoix. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  17. Brown, Alistair (3 May 2019). "Switzerland: Bastian Baker Announced As Commentator For Grand Final". Eurovoix. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  18. "Dal 3 giugno addio al Digitale Terrestre in Svizzera, niente più Eurovision sulla RSI per gli italiani" [Farewell to DTT in Switzerland from 3 June, no more Eurovision on CSR for Italians]. eurofestivalnews.com (in Italian). 6 May 2019. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  19. Herbert, Emily (24 April 2019). "Switzerland: Sinplus Revealed as Eurovision 2019 Spokespersons". Eurovoix. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  20. "TV-Programm" (in German). Swiss Broadcasting Corporation . Retrieved 2021-05-10.
  21. "Eurovision 2021: scarica la Guida completa all'evento (anche in versione eBook!)". Eurofestival (in Italian). Retrieved 2021-05-11.
  22. "Programme TV" (in French). Radio Télévision Suisse . Retrieved 2021-05-10.
  23. Granger, Anthony (2021-04-12). "Switzerland: Sven Epiney Confirmed as SRF's Eurovision 2021 Commentator". Eurovoix. Retrieved 2021-04-12.
  24. Granger, Anthony (2021-04-27). "Switzerland: Angélique Beldner Revealed as Spokesperson For Eurovision 2021". Eurovoix. Retrieved 2021-04-27.