Nemo (singer)

Last updated

Nemo
Nemo PreparyES 01 (cropped).jpg
Nemo in 2024
Background information
Birth nameNemo Mettler
Born (1999-08-03) 3 August 1999 (age 24)
Biel/Bienne, Canton of Bern, Switzerland
Genres
Occupation(s)
  • Singer
  • rapper
Instrument(s)
  • Vocals
  • violin
  • piano
  • drums
LabelsBakara Music [1]
Website nemothings.com

Nemo Mettler (born 3 August 1999), known mononymously as Nemo, is a Swiss musician and singer-rapper who plays the violin, piano and drums. [2] They were the first openly non-binary act to represent Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest, and later won the 2024 contest with the song "The Code". They were the first openly non-binary musician to win the contest, and the third winner representing Switzerland (following the 1956 and 1988 competitions). [3] [4]

Contents

Career

Nemo at the press conference following their Eurovision win in 2024 Nemo Trophy Press Conference.jpg
Nemo at the press conference following their Eurovision win in 2024

Nemo began their interest in music at the age of three, learning to play the violin, piano and drum machine. They studied opera singing from age nine to thirteen. [5] At the age of ten, they joined the Biel children's opera and performed in Mozart's The Magic Flute [6] which was later used as inspiration for "The Code". [7] At thirteen, they performed in the musical I've never been to New York. [8] They also began rapping at this age, competing in Swiss contests and performing songs they independently wrote. [9] They found early success in battle rap as a teenager [10] and performed on season three of the Swiss television show Die grössten Schweizer Talente  [ de ], receiving praise from the judges. [11]

In 2015, Nemo released their first EP Clownfisch, under the name Nemo (CH), which peaked at number 95 in the Swiss charts. [12] [13] In 2016, when they were seventeen, Nemo's single "Cypher" went viral. [8] In 2017, Nemo released the EPs Momänt-Kids [14] and Fundbüro under the name Nemo (CH). [15] Fundbüro contained the single "Du", [16] which reached number 4 in Switzerland. [17] "Ke Bock" and "Himalaya" also charted. [8] In the same year they studied solo singing in jazz and pop at Zurich University of the Arts, [9] [18] won the SRF 3 Best Talent prize, [8] and later settled in Berlin to pursue their music career. [19] In 2018, Nemo won four Swiss Music Prizes, including best song of the year for Du and best concert performance of the year. [8]

After staying in Los Angeles in 2020, Nemo decided to switch from singing in Swiss German to English. [20] [8] On the second season of The Masked Singer Switzerland in 2021, they were unmasked as a panda and finished in fifth place. [21] In 2022, they released their EP Whatever Feels Right, this time under the name Nemo. [22] On 29 February 2024, they were announced as the Swiss representative in the Eurovision Song Contest 2024 with the song "The Code", and performed in the second semi-final of the contest, on 9 May. [23] They won the Eurovision final on 11 May with 591 points, becoming the first openly non-binary performer to win the contest; they also finished with the fourth highest amount of points in the final in the competition's history. [24] [25]

Personal life

Nemo at Eurovision Song Contest 2024 Nemo Eurovision Song Contest 2024 Final Malmo dress rehearsal semi 2 06 (cropped).jpg
Nemo at Eurovision Song Contest 2024

Nemo Mettler was born in Biel/Bienne in the canton of Bern. [26] Their father, Markus Mettler, is an entrepreneur and inventor, and mother, Nadja Schnetzler, a journalist. [27] Nemo's sister, Ella, is a photographer. [28] She collaborates with Nemo in the artistic direction of their projects. [29] Nemo's first name means 'no one' in Latin. During a mission for the Swiss Red Cross in El Salvador in 2018, they said "my parents thought that if I was no-one, I could become anyone." [30] [31]

In 2022, Nemo came out as pansexual via an Instagram story, [32] and as of 2024, they have been in a five-year relationship with their girlfriend, who was the first person they came out to (as non-binary). [33]

In November 2023, Nemo came out as non-binary in an article in the SonntagsZeitung , [34] after being closeted since around 2021. [10] In the article, Nemo also stated that they prefer to be referred to by their given name instead of pronouns in German, [34] and use they/them pronouns in English. [35]

Nemo currently lives in Berlin. [36]

Activism

Following their Eurovision win, Nemo called on the Swiss government to legally recognise a third gender, after this proposal was rejected in 2022. [37] When asked in an interview who they would call first after their win, they responded with Beat Jans, Switzerland's justice minister, stating that "we need to have the representation in our politics". A spokesperson for Jans later stated that the minister had responded and was willing to meet Nemo to discuss the rights of non-binary people in Switzerland. [38] In response to the topic, Green Party member of the National Council Sibel Arslan wrote on social media that "a non-binary person who officially doesn't exist in Switzerland has won Eurovision 2024", and that the matter was "more relevant than ever", urging the Federal Council to act. [39]

Discography

Extended plays

List of EPs, with selected details
TitleDetailsPeak chart positions
SWI
[17]
Clownfisch95
Momänt-Kids
  • Released: 21 October 2017 [14]
  • Label: Bakara Music
  • Formats: Digital download, streaming
Fundbüro
  • Released: 17 November 2017 [15]
  • Label: Bakara Music
  • Formats: Digital download, streaming
Whatever Feels Right
  • Released: 9 September 2022 [22]
  • Label: Self-released
  • Formats: Digital download, streaming
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Singles

As lead artist

TitleYearPeak chart positionsAlbum or EP
SWI
[17]
FIN
[40]
GER
[41]
IRE
[42]
ITA
[43]
LTU
[44]
NLD
[45]
NOR
[46]
SWE
[47]
UK
[48]
"Himalaya"201627*Momänt-Kids
"Style"
(with Marc Amacher)
2017Non-album single
"Du"4Fundbüro
"Usserirdisch"64
"Crush uf di"201877Non-album singles
"5i uf de Uhr"201931
"365"
"Girl us mire City"
"Dance with Me"2020
"Video Games"
"Hailey"
(with Chelan)
2021Orange & Blue
"Certified Pop Queen"Non-album singles
"Chleiderchäschtli"
(with KT Gorique  [ fr ])
"Lonely AF"2022Whatever Feels Right
"Own Sh¡t"
"F*ck Love"
(with Anthony de la Torre)
"Be like You"
"This Body"2023Non-album singles
"Falling Again"2024
"The Code"1314561171313518
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.
"*" denotes the chart did not exist at that time.
TitleYearAlbum or EP
"Sheriff"
(Visu featuring Nemo)
2016Sex & Röschti
"Singer"
(Dodo  [ de ] featuring Nemo)
2017Pfingstweid
"Legend"
(Stress featuring Nemo)
2019Sincèrement

Other charted songs

TitleYearPeak chart positionsAlbum or EP
SWI
[17]
"Ke bock"201731Momänt-Kids
"Kunstwärch"90Fundbüro

Awards and achievements

AwardYearCategoryNominee(s)ResultRef.
Energy Star Night2017Energy Music AwardThemselfWon [49]
Prix Walo Best NewcomerWon [50]
Swiss Music Awards Best TalentWon [51]
2018Best Male Solo ActWon [52] [53]
Best Breaking ActWon
Best Live ActWon
Best Hit"Du"Won
OUTmusic Award2024Eurovision Song of the Year"The Code"Won [54]
Eurostory AwardBest LyricsWon [55]

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lys Assia</span> Swiss singer (1924–2018)

Lys Assia was a Swiss singer who won the first Eurovision Song Contest in 1956. Assia was born in Rupperswil, Aargau, and began her stage career as a dancer, but changed to singing in 1940 after successfully standing in for a female singer.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Eurovision Song Contest 1989</span> International song competition

The Eurovision Song Contest 1989 was the 34th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest, held on 6 May 1989 in the Palais de Beaulieu in Lausanne, Switzerland. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Télévision suisse romande (TSR) on behalf of the Swiss Broadcasting Corporation, and presented by Jacques Deschenaux and Lolita Morena, the contest was held in Switzerland following the country's victory at the 1988 contest with the song "Ne partez pas sans moi" by Céline Dion.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Eurovision Song Contest 1972</span> International song competition

The Eurovision Song Contest 1972 was the 17th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Edinburgh, United Kingdom and was organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), who agreed to stage the event after Monaco, who won in 1971, were unable to meet the demands of hosting the event and could not find a suitable venue. The contest was held at the Usher Hall on 25 March 1972 and was hosted by Scottish ballet dancer Moira Shearer.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest</span> Overview of the role of Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest

Germany has officially participated in every Eurovision Song Contest since its inaugural edition in 1956, except in 1996 when its entry did not qualify past the audio-only pre-selection round, and consequently was not seen in the broadcast final and does not count as one of Germany's 66 appearances. No other country has been represented as many times. Along with France, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom, Germany is one of the "Big Five" countries that are automatically prequalified for the final, due to being the largest financial contributors to the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). The final is broadcast in Germany on ARD's flagship channel, Das Erste.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest</span> Overview of the performance of Switzerland at the Eurovision Song Contest

Switzerland has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 63 times since its debut at the first contest in 1956, missing only four contests: 1995, 1999, 2001, and 2003. Switzerland hosted the first contest in 1956 in Lugano, where it also won. The country claimed its second victory in 1988, 32 years after the first, and its third in 2024, 36 years after the second win.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest</span> Overview of the role of Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest

Austria has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 56 times since its debut in 1957. The country has won twice, in 1966 and 2014, and such it holds the record for the longest gap between consecutive wins — 48 years. The contest is broadcast in Austria by ORF. Vienna was the host city on both of the occasions that the contest was held in Austria, in 1967 and 2015.

Switzerland competed in the Eurovision Song Contest 2008 with the song "Era stupendo" by Paolo Meneguzzi. Meneguzzi was chosen by the Swiss national broadcaster, SRG SSR idée suisse, to sing for Switzerland in Belgrade, Serbia. For 2008, SRG SSR idée suisse had continued to internally select the song and singer to represent Switzerland at the 2008 contest, with an open call for songs being held by the broadcaster.

Switzerland participated at the Eurovision Song Contest 2010 with the song "Il pleut de l'or" written by Michael von der Heide, Pele Loriano and Heike Kospach. The song was performed by Michael von der Heide, who was internally selected by the Swiss broadcaster SRG SSR idée suisse to represent the nation at the 2010 contest in Oslo, Norway. "Il pleut de l'or" was announced as the Swiss entry on 18 December 2009, while the song was presented to the public on 9 January 2010.

Switzerland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2011 with the song "In Love for a While" written by David Klein. The song was performed by Anna Rossinelli. The Swiss entry for the 2011 contest in Düsseldorf, Germany was selected through the national final Die grosse Entscheidungs Show 2011, organised by the Swiss German speaking broadcaster Schweizer Fernsehen (SF) and radio station DRS 3 in collaboration with the other broadcasters part of SRG SSR idée suisse. SF, DRS 3, the Swiss-French broadcaster Télévision Suisse Romande (TSR) and the Swiss-Italian broadcaster Radiotelevisione svizzera (RSI) each conducted varying selections and a total of twelve entries were selected to advance to the televised national final—seven artists and songs from the SF selection, three from the DRS 3 selection, one from the TSR selection and one from the RSI selection. The twelve finalists performed during the national final on 11 December 2010 were public voting ultimately selected "In Love for a While" performed by Anna Rossinelli as the winner.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Luca Hänni</span> Swiss singer

Luca Hänni is a Swiss pop singer and television personality. He rose to fame in 2012 after winning the ninth season of Deutschland sucht den Superstar, the German version of the Idol franchise. He was the first non-German to do so and also the youngest ever winner of the show. Hänni's debut single, "Don't Think About Me", topped the singles charts in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. It was followed by the release of his debut album, My Name Is Luca (2012), which debuted atop the Austrian and Swiss Albums Charts and became a gold-seller in both countries. His second studio album, Living the Dream, released in 2013, became his second consecutive number-one album in Switzerland.

Switzerland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2013 with the song "You and Me" written by Georg Schlunegger, Roman Camenzind and Fred Herrmann. The song was performed by the band Takasa. The Swiss entry for the 2013 contest in Malmö, Sweden was selected through the national final Die grosse Entscheidungs Show 2013, organised by the Swiss German speaking broadcaster Schweizer Fernsehen (SF) in collaboration with the other broadcasters part of the Swiss Broadcasting Corporation. SF, the Swiss-French broadcaster Radio Télévision Suisse (RTS) and the Swiss-Italian broadcaster Radiotelevisione svizzera (RSI) each conducted varying selections and a total of nine entries were selected to advance to the televised national final—four artists and songs from the SF selection, three from the RTS selection and two from the RSI selection. The nine finalists performed during the national final on 15 December 2012 where public voting ultimately selected "You and Me" performed by Heilsarmee as the winner. The group was renamed as Takasa for the Eurovision Song Contest in order to prevent violating the rules of the competition.

Switzerland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2000 with the song "La vita cos'è?" written by Bernie Staub and Thomas Marin. The song was performed by Jane Bogaert. The Swiss broadcaster SRG SSR idée suisse returned to the Eurovision Song Contest after a one-year absence following their relegation from 1999 as one of the six countries with the least average points over the preceding five contests. The Swiss entry for the 2000 contest in Stockholm, Sweden was selected through a national final organised by SRG SSR idée suisse. Six entries performed during the national final on 29 January 2000 where a combination of jury voting and public voting selected "La vita cos'è?" performed by Jane Bogaert as the winner.

Switzerland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2016 with the song "The Last of Our Kind" written by Christina Maria Rieder, Mike James, Jeff Dawson and Warne Livesey. The song was performed by Rykka, which is the artistic name of singer Christina Maria Rieder. The Swiss entry for the 2016 contest in Stockholm, Sweden was selected through the national final ESC 2016 – die Entscheidungsshow, organised by the Swiss German speaking broadcaster Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen (SRF) in collaboration with the other broadcasters part of the Swiss Broadcasting Corporation. Artists that were interested in entering the Swiss national final had the opportunity to apply to one of three open selections with defined submission periods organised by SRF together with the Swiss-Romansh broadcaster Radiotelevisiun Svizra Rumantscha (RTR), the Swiss-French broadcaster Radio Télévision Suisse (RTS) and/or the Swiss-Italian broadcaster Radiotelevisione svizzera (RSI). A total of 19 entries were selected to advance to an "Expert Check" round; ten entries were selected from the SRF/RTR selection, six entries were selected from the RTS selection and three entries were selected from the RSI selection. The "Expert Check" was held on 6 December 2015 and involved four experts evaluating the live performances of the 19 entries and selecting six entries to advance to the televised national final—three artists and songs from the SRF/RTR candidates, two from the RTS candidates and one from the RSI candidates. The six finalists performed during the national final on 13 February 2016 where a combination of jury voting and public voting ultimately selected "The Last of Our Kind" performed by Rykka as the winner.

Switzerland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2017 with the song "Apollo" written by Elias Näslin, Nicolas Günthardt and Alessandra Günthardt. The song was performed by the band Timebelle. The Swiss entry for the 2017 contest in Kyiv, Ukraine was selected through the national final ESC 2017 – die Entscheidungsshow, organised by the Swiss broadcaster Swiss Broadcasting Corporation. Artists that were interested in entering the Swiss national final had the opportunity to apply during a submission period organised by SRG SSR. A total of 21 entries were selected to advance to an "Live Check" round held on 4 December 2016 and involved nineteen experts evaluating the live performances of the 21 entries and selecting six entries to advance to the televised national final. The six finalists performed during the national final on 5 February 2017 where public voting ultimately selected "Apollo" performed by Timebelle as the winner.

Switzerland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2018 with the song "Stones" written by Corinne "Coco" Gfeller, Stee Gfeller and Laurell Barker. The song was performed by the duo Zibbz. The Swiss entry for the 2018 contest in Lisbon, Portugal was selected through the national final ESC 2018 – die Entscheidungsshow, organised by the Swiss broadcaster Swiss Broadcasting Corporation. Songwriters that were interested in entering the Swiss national final had the opportunity to apply during a submission period organised by SRG SSR. Six entries were selected to advance to the televised national final, and the six finalists performed during the national final on 4 February 2018 where a combination of international jury voting and public voting ultimately selected "Stones" performed by Zibbz as the winner.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Zibbz</span> Swiss indie pop duo

Zibbz is a Swiss duo made of siblings Corinne and Stefan Gfeller. They represented Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2018 with the song "Stones". They are from Zürich, but are based in Los Angeles.

Switzerland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2022 in Turin, Italy, with "Boys Do Cry" written by Marius Hügli and Martin Gallop. The song was performed by Marius Bear, which is the artistic name of singer Marius Hügli who was internally selected by the Swiss broadcaster Swiss Broadcasting Corporation to represent the nation at the 2022 contest. "Boys Do Cry" was presented to the public as the Swiss entry on 8 March 2022.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Eurovision Song Contest 2025</span> International song competition

The Eurovision Song Contest 2025 is expected to be the 69th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster the Swiss Broadcasting Corporation, the contest will be held in Switzerland, following the country's victory at the 2024 contest with the song "The Code" by Nemo. This will be the third time that Switzerland hosts the contest, having done so for the inaugural contest in 1956 and the 1989 contest, held in Lugano and Lausanne respectively.

Switzerland participated in and won the Eurovision Song Contest 2024 in Malmö, Sweden, with "The Code" performed by Nemo. The Swiss broadcaster Swiss Broadcasting Corporation internally selected the country's representative for the contest.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">The Code (Nemo song)</span> 2024 song by Nemo

"The Code" is a song by Swiss singer Nemo, released on 29 February 2024. It has been described by Nemo as a song that details their experience with coming to terms with their non-binary identity. They represented Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2024 with the song, where they won the contest with 591 points. In the process, the song became the first victory for the country since Céline Dion's Ne partez pas sans moi in 1988, and the first winning song ever in the history of the contest by a non-binary artist.

References

  1. Tuchschmid, Benno (14 October 2016). "Dieser 17-jährige Zahnspangenträger wird der nächste Mundart-Rap-Star". Aargauer Zeitung (in Swiss High German). Archived from the original on 27 December 2016. Retrieved 27 December 2016.
  2. Vallicotti, Simona (2 February 2016). "Nemo: Ein 16-Jähriger trocknet die Schweizer Rapszene ab" (in Swiss High German). SRG SSR. Archived from the original on 5 April 2019. Retrieved 29 February 2024.
  3. Fox, Hilary (8 May 2024). "Nemo, among the favorites at Eurovision, is finding acceptance onstage and off". AP News . Archived from the original on 9 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
  4. "Switzerland wins Eurovision as chaos engulfs iconic song contest". Sky News. Archived from the original on 11 May 2024. Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  5. Marzi, Mattia (12 May 2024). "Nemo, chi è la star non binaria che ha vinto l'Eurovision". Rockol (in Italian). Archived from the original on 11 May 2024. Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  6. Hämmerli, Rachel (30 April 2024). "Nemo bringt mit Bieler Sinfonieorchester den ESC-Song neu raus". ajour.ch. Archived from the original on 17 May 2024. Retrieved 15 May 2024.
  7. "Eurovision 2024: Your guide to all 37 songs". www.bbc.com. Archived from the original on 15 May 2024. Retrieved 15 May 2024.
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "ESC 2024: Nemo ist ein alter Musik-Hase". Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen (SRF) (in German). 29 February 2024. Archived from the original on 29 April 2024. Retrieved 14 May 2024.
  9. 1 2 "Nemo gewinnt Eurovision Song Contest 2024". ZHdK (in German). Archived from the original on 13 May 2024. Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  10. 1 2 Marshall, Alex (11 May 2024). "Will Nemo, from Switzerland, be Eurovision's first nonbinary star?". The New York Times . ProQuest   3053575322. Archived from the original on 17 May 2024. Retrieved 13 May 2024.
  11. NDR. "ESC-Siegeract Nemo setzt Zeichen zur Selbstfindung". www.eurovision.de (in German). Archived from the original on 15 May 2024. Retrieved 15 May 2024.
  12. 1 2 "Clownfisch EP - EP by Nemo (CH)". Spotify . Archived from the original on 29 February 2024. Retrieved 29 February 2024.
  13. "Switzerland: It's Nemo for Eurovision 2024 with the song 'The Code'". www.eurofansradio.com. Archived from the original on 14 May 2024. Retrieved 14 May 2024.
  14. 1 2 "Momänt-Kids - EP by Nemo (CH)". Spotify . Archived from the original on 29 February 2024. Retrieved 29 February 2024.
  15. 1 2 "Fundbüro - EP by Nemo (CH)". Spotify . Archived from the original on 29 February 2024. Retrieved 29 February 2024.
  16. O'Connor, Roisin (11 May 2024). "Meet Nemo, Switzerland's Eurovision 2024 entry". The Independent . Archived from the original on 11 May 2024. Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  17. 1 2 3 4 "Nemo". hitparade.ch (in Swiss High German). Swiss Hitparade. Archived from the original on 10 March 2024. Retrieved 29 February 2024.
  18. Künste, ZHdK-Zürcher Hochschule der. "Nemo Mettler «Best Talent 2017» | ZHdK.ch". ZHdK (in German). Archived from the original on 12 May 2024. Retrieved 14 May 2024.
  19. Feller, Michael (2 March 2024). "Vor «Sing meinen Song» und dem ESC – Was erhoffen Sie sich, Nemo? Den Sieg?". Der Bund (in German). Archived from the original on 9 March 2024. Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  20. "Nemo outet sich als non-binär – «Weder Frau noch Mann»". Schweizer Illustrierte (in Swiss High German). Archived from the original on 17 May 2024. Retrieved 14 May 2024.
  21. Ascione, Arianna (11 May 2024). "Chi è Nemo, il concorrente svizzero vincitore di Eurovision 2024". Corriere della Sera (in Italian). Archived from the original on 12 May 2024. Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  22. 1 2 "Whatever Feels Right - EP by Nemo". Spotify . Archived from the original on 29 February 2024. Retrieved 1 March 2024.
  23. "Nemo will perform 'The Code' in Malmö for Switzerland". Eurovision.tv. EBU. 29 February 2024. Archived from the original on 29 February 2024. Retrieved 29 February 2024.
  24. Oltermann, Philip (11 May 2024). "Switzerland wins Eurovision song contest after controversial grand final". The Observer . ISSN   0029-7712. Archived from the original on 13 May 2024. Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  25. Brady, Kate (12 May 2024). "Switzerland wins politically-charged 2024 Eurovision Song Contest". The Washington Post . ISSN   0190-8286 . Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  26. Pascoli, Andrea (11 May 2024). "Chi è Nemo, la popstar della Svizzera icona della comunità Lgbtq+. Sul palco con la bandiera del genere non binario". La Repubblica (in Italian). Archived from the original on 11 May 2024. Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  27. Hopf-Sulc, Adrian (8 May 2024). "Ideenlabor Brainstore in Biel – Wie Nemos Eltern die schrägste Fabrik der Schweiz gründeten". Der Bund (in German). Archived from the original on 11 May 2024. Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  28. "Ideenlabor Brainstore in Biel – Wie Nemos Eltern die schrägste Fabrik der Schweiz gründeten". Der Bund (in German). 8 May 2024. Archived from the original on 11 May 2024. Retrieved 14 May 2024.
  29. Martino, Gaia (12 May 2024). "Chi è Nemo, cantante della Svizzera e prima persona non binaria a vincere l'Eurovision Song Contest". Fanpage.it (in Italian). Archived from the original on 12 May 2024. Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  30. "Ideenlabor Brainstore in Biel – Wie Nemos Eltern die schrägste Fabrik der Schweiz gründeten". Der Bund (in German). 8 May 2024. Archived from the original on 11 May 2024. Retrieved 14 May 2024.
  31. "Nemo: Der Bieler Sänger auf SRK-Mission in El Salvador". Schweizer Illustrierte (in German). Archived from the original on 12 May 2024. Retrieved 14 May 2024.
  32. Linder, Armin T. (14 May 2024). "ESC-Star Nemo ist pansexuell und non-binär: So nahm Freundin das Coming-Out auf". Münchner Merkur. Archived from the original on 14 May 2024. Retrieved 14 May 2024.
  33. Brügger, Nadine A. (14 May 2024). "Nemo macht, was Nemo will". Neue Zürcher Zeitung. Archived from the original on 12 May 2024. Retrieved 11 May 2024.
  34. 1 2 Fischer, Martin (11 November 2023). "Nemo im Interview – «Ich fühle mich weder als Mann noch als Frau»". Tages-Anzeiger (in German). Archived from the original on 27 February 2024. Retrieved 12 November 2023.
  35. McCormick, Neil (12 May 2024). "Nemo's winning song The Code is a Eurovision rarity – it's actually great". The Daily Telegraph . ISSN   0307-1235. Archived from the original on 12 May 2024. Retrieved 12 May 2024.
  36. "Nemo outet sich als non-binär – «Weder Frau noch Mann»". Schweizer Illustrierte (in German). Archived from the original on 29 February 2024. Retrieved 14 May 2024.
  37. "Swiss government rejects 3rd gender option, at least for now". AP News. 21 December 2022. Archived from the original on 16 May 2024. Retrieved 16 May 2024.
  38. "Non-binary Swiss artist Nemo wins Eurovision Song Contest with 'The Code'". Yahoo News. 11 May 2024. Archived from the original on 12 May 2024. Retrieved 17 May 2024.
  39. Kassam, Ashifa (16 May 2022). "Eurovision winner Nemo urges Switzerland to recognise third gender". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 17 May 2024. Retrieved 16 May 2024.
  40. "Nemo: The Code" (in Finnish). Musiikkituottajat. Archived from the original on 17 May 2024. Retrieved 18 May 2024.
  41. "Discographie von Nemo" (in German). GfK Entertainment. Archived from the original on 18 May 2024. Retrieved 17 May 2024.
  42. "Official Irish Singles Chart Top 50". Official Charts Company. 17 May 2024. Archived from the original on 17 May 2024. Retrieved 18 May 2024.
  43. Peak chart positions for singles in Italy:
  44. "2024 20-os savaitės klausomiausi (Top 100)" (in Lithuanian). AGATA. 17 May 2024. Archived from the original on 17 May 2024. Retrieved 17 May 2024.
  45. "Discografie Nemo". Dutch Charts (in Dutch). Archived from the original on 18 May 2024. Retrieved 17 May 2024.
  46. "Singel 2024 uke 20". VG-lista. Archived from the original on 17 May 2024. Retrieved 17 May 2024.
  47. "Veckolista Singlar, vecka 20". Sverigetopplistan. Archived from the original on 13 May 2024. Retrieved 17 May 2024.
  48. "Nemo songs and albums | full Official Chart history". Official Charts Company . Archived from the original on 17 May 2024. Retrieved 18 May 2024.
  49. "Das war die Energy Star Night 2017" [That was Energy Star Night 2017]. energy.ch (in Swiss High German). NRJ. 16 November 2017. Archived from the original on 29 February 2024. Retrieved 29 February 2024.
  50. "44. Prix Walo". prixwalo.ch (in Swiss High German). Prix Walo. Archived from the original on 27 February 2024. Retrieved 29 February 2024.
  51. "Stein um Stein: Die Gewinner der Swiss Music Awards 2017" [Stone by stone: The winners of the Swiss Music Awards 2017]. srf.ch (in Swiss High German). SRG SSR. 11 May 2017. Archived from the original on 29 February 2024. Retrieved 29 February 2024.
  52. "Swiss Music Awards 2018 - The Showacts and Nominees". loadsofmusic.com. 18 January 2018. Archived from the original on 28 November 2022. Retrieved 29 February 2024.
  53. "Swiss Music Awards 2018: alle Highlights, alle Gewinner" [Swiss Music Awards 2018: all highlights, all winners]. srf.ch (in Swiss High German). SRG SSR. 10 February 2018. Archived from the original on 29 February 2024. Retrieved 29 February 2024.
  54. "Nemo wins the 2024 OUTmusic Award". OutTV. 6 May 2024. Archived from the original on 9 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
  55. "Switzerland wins our Eurostory Best Lyrics Award 2024". eurostory.nl. 8 May 2024. Archived from the original on 9 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
Awards and achievements
Preceded by Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest
2024
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Flag of Sweden.svg Loreen
with "Tattoo"
Winner of the Eurovision Song Contest
2024
Succeeded by
Incumbent