Thomas Ranck Round Barn

Last updated

Thomas Ranck Round Barn

Round barn Indiana.jpg

Thomas Ranck Round Barn in Indiana.
USA Indiana location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location North of Brownsville on County Road 500N, Waterloo Township, Fayette County, Indiana
Nearest city Brownsville, Indiana
Coordinates 39°42′50″N85°2′40″W / 39.71389°N 85.04444°W / 39.71389; -85.04444 Coordinates: 39°42′50″N85°2′40″W / 39.71389°N 85.04444°W / 39.71389; -85.04444
Area less than one acre
Built c.1885 – 1910 [1]
Architect possibly Isaac McNammee [1]
Architectural style Round barn
NRHP reference # 83000030 [2]
Added to NRHP January 11, 1983 [2]

The Thomas Ranck Round Barn is a round barn in Waterloo Township near the Fayette-Wayne County, Indiana county line. It is one of many round barns built in Indiana during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. [1] Of the round barns built in eastern Indiana during this period the Ranck Round Barn stands out as one of the most elaborately designed structures. The Thomas Ranck Round Barn was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in January 1983.

Waterloo Township, Fayette County, Indiana Township in Indiana, United States

Waterloo Township is one of nine townships in Fayette County, Indiana. As of the 2010 census, its population was 607 and it contained 240 housing units.

Fayette County, Indiana County in the United States

Fayette County is one of 92 counties in U.S. state of Indiana located in the east central portion of the state. As of 2010, the population was 24,277. Most of the county is rural; land use is farms, pasture and unincorporated woodland. The county seat and only incorporated town is Connersville which holds a majority of the county's population.

Wayne County, Indiana County in the United States

Wayne County is a county located in east central Indiana, United States on the border with Ohio. As of the 2010 census, the population was 68,917. The county seat is Richmond.

Contents

Built in 1904, the Ranck Round Barn is a large and wood frame barn. It is part of a complex of buildings on the southeast portion of the McDivitt property in Brownsville, Indiana. Erected on a bank with a concrete foundation, the barn is 70 feet (21 m) in diameter, and is 70 feet (21 m) tall. The open structure consists of three circular tiers stacked on top of one another. The top section forms a cupola. [3] Isaac McNammee constructed the Ranck Barn in 1904 for Thomas and Nancy Ranck. McNammee built several round barns in the area, and patented his design for a self-supporting conical roof in 1905. [3] The Ranck farm was purchased in 1937 by a local veterinarian and his wife, Ralph and Tena Carmack. In 1945, Emmett and Mary McDivitt purchased the property. [3]

Brownsville, Indiana Unincorporated community in Indiana, United States

Brownsville is an unincorporated community in Brownsville Township, Union County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.

Exterior

Thomas Ranck Round Barn, Indiana Thomas Ranck Rd Barn 064516pu.jpg
Thomas Ranck Round Barn, Indiana

This perfectly round structure has no central support system of timbers. With the exception of some timbers on the lower level, no structural member is more than 2.5 inches (6.4 cm) thick. The main floor is raised above the surrounding ground, and the lower level, is at grade. The exterior is covered with vertical wood siding, painted white. [3]

The lower level is made of studs about 2'6" on center. Joists span in various directions to make a platform for the second level. At this level the main drum has studs with rhythmically spaced angle bracing reaching to the upper first roof plate. These braces are paired and spaced and have intermediate stiffening diagonals. Each upper drum rests on a laminated sill/plate, which apparently acts as a tension ring. [3]

Tension ring

A tension ring is a type of finger ring in which the gemstone is held in place by pressure rather than prongs, a bezel or other mounting. The metal setting is actually spring-loaded to exert pressure onto the gemstone, and tiny etchings/grooves are added to the metal in order to create a shelf for the gemstone's edges to rest. The gemstone appears to be suspended in the air with nothing holding it in place.

An earthen ramp slopes up to the main entrance for the upper level on the west side. The doorway is in a projecting bay with a low gambrel roof. It has two sliding wooden doors consisting of three horizontal panels, with diagonally bracing in the top and bottom panels. At grade access is provided on the north side. Another pair of wooden doors once hung from the shed roof overhang, which has been removed. [3] The barn roof is a series of truncated cones. The cupola has a conical cap. The roof is covered in gray asphalt shingles. The overhanging eaves have exposed rafters and fascia. [3] Small windows provide light and ventilation on the main and lower floor. At the loft level, there are small, square, fixed windows around the building. In the cupola, square, louvered vents]] have replaced the windows, which were the same shape as those at the loft level. [3]

Interior

Roof trusses in the Thomas Ranck Round Barn, Indiana Thomas Ranck Rd Barn 064520pv.jpg
Roof trusses in the Thomas Ranck Round Barn, Indiana

The lower level has a concrete floor with access from the north. Stock pens are arranged around the perimeter. A central circular walkway allows access to all of the stalls. An interior stairway leads to the main level. [3]

The main level has an earth floor. Divided by wood partitions, the floor serves as a storage area for equipment and supplies. On this level is a one-story wooden corncrib. Two grain bins, 10 by 15 feet (3.0 by 4.6 m) are located in the center. [3] The interior is open to the roof of the cupola. A hayloft extends overs about 1/3 of the main floor. It is supported by paired brackets and diagonal beams placed between the brackets in each pair. [3]

Significance

The Ranck, or McDiyitt, Round Barn is significant as one of the best-preserved of Indiana's round barns. This local landmark is essentially unaltered, and has been well maintained over the years. The barn has no system of central support for its three-tier roof, and few structural members more than. 2 ½ inches thick. [3] Its remarkable construction makes it an outstanding example of stick carpentry engineering.

Design

The Ranck Round Barn is 70 feet in diameter at its base and stands 70 feet tall. [1] The barn features two rows of clerestories set between round lantern conical roofs which decrease in size with height. The building's west entrance has a pavilion with a gambrel roof.

Related Research Articles

Ryan Round Barn

The Ryan Round Barn is a historic round barn located about six miles north of the city of Kewanee, Illinois in Johnson-Sauk Trail State Park.

James Bruce Round Barn round barn in Illinois, USA

The James Bruce Round Barn is a round barn located near the Stephenson County, Illinois city of Freeport, United States. The barn was constructed in 1914 by the team of Jeremiah Shaffer and the Haas Brothers, who were responsible for at least a dozen round barns in the area. The barn features a single hip roof design which was probably influenced by the Agricultural Experiment Stations at the University of Illinois and the University of Wisconsin–Madison. The Bruce Round Barn was the last known round barn designed by the Shaffer–Haas team. The building was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple property submission in 1984.

W. H. York Round Barn place in Indiana listed on National Register of Historic Places

The W. H. York Round Barn, also known as Thompson Barn, is a historic round barn located on Country Road 249 (CR-249) a half mile south of Lodi, in Liberty Township, Parke County, Indiana. It was built about 1895, and is a two-level wood-frame structure on a brick foundation. The barn measures 56 feet in diameter. It has a conical roof topped by a circular cupola.

Gerald Harbach Round Barn

The Gerald Harbach Round Barn is a round barn near Eleroy, an unincorporated community in Stephenson County, Illinois, United States. The builder and designer of the building are unknown but it is very similar to round barns designed by the team of Jeremiah Shaffer and the Hass Brothers. It was probably built around the same time as the James Bruce Round Barn, erected in 1914, in Freeport. The Harbach Round Barn was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Dennis Otte Round Barn

The Dennis Otte Round Barn is a round barn in the U.S. state of Illinois near the unincorporated Stephenson County community of Eleroy. The barn was built in 1930 by Herman Altenbern and has a diameter of 54 feet. The barn is representative of the last round barn design variations that evolved. The Otte Round Barn was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Young Round Barn

Young Round Barn is a historic round barn at Greene in Chenango County, New York built in 1914.

Nebergall "Knoll Crest" Round Barn

The Nebergall "Knoll Crest" Round Barn is located between Davenport and Blue Grass in rural Scott County, Iowa, United States. It was built in 1914, and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1986.

Round Barn, Bruce Township Section 3

The Round Barn, Bruce Township Section 3 is located in Bruce Township, Benton County, Iowa, United States. It was built in 1910 for use as a cattle barn. The building is a true round barn that measures 60 feet (18 m) in diameter. The barn is constructed of clay tile and features a conical roof. The structure does not have a cupola, but there is a silo that rises through the center. There is also a round machine shed on the same property. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1986.

Round Barn, Bruce Township Section 6

The Round Barn, Bruce Township Section 6 is located in Bruce Township, Benton County, Iowa United States. It was built in 1914 as a general purpoose barn. The building is a true round barn that measures 60 feet (18 m) in diameter. The barn is constructed of clay tile from the Johnston Brothers' Clay Works and it features a conical roof. The structure does not have a cupola, but there is a silo that rises from the center. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1986.

Charles B. Reynolds Round Barn

The Charles B. Reynolds Round Barn was a historic building located near Doon in rural Lyon County, Iowa, United States. It was built in the summer of 1904. In the early 1920s, the original conical roof was damaged due to a windstorm and replaced with a gambrel roof. The building was a true round barn and featured white horizontal siding, a two-pitch sectional roof and an octagon louvered cupola. The barn has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1999. The barn was razed in September 2009.

Hamilton Round Barn

Hamilton Round Barn is a historic round barn located near Mannington, Marion County, West Virginia. It was built in 1911, and is circular in shape, measuring 66 feet in diameter and 75 feet high at the center. It features a gambrel roof topped by a six-sided cupola. The barn has horizontal clapboard siding of poplar, painted white, and a slate roof. In 1985, it was one of only five round and polygonal barns standing in West Virginia. The barn was purchased by the West Augusta Historical Society in 1983, and is operated as a museum.

El Tovar Stables house the animals used in general transportation around the park

The El Tovar Stables at the south rim of the Grand Canyon were built about 1904, at the same time the nearby El Tovar Hotel was built, to house the animals used in general transportation around the park. Collectively called the "transportation department" in the early 20th century, the three structures comprised a horse barn or stable, a mule barn and a blacksmith shop.

Neff Round Barn

Neff Round Barn, also known as the Red Round Barn, is a historic round barn located at Potter Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania. It was built about 1910, and is a white pine structure on a limestone foundation. The interior has two floors: the cattle floor and the mow floor. It is 88 feet (27 m) in diameter and 56 feet (17 m) tall at the cupola, encompassing 6,000 square feet. It has a conical roof.

Strauther Pleak Round Barn

The Strauther Pleak Round Barn, also known as the "Pleak-Morgan Barn", is a round barn near Greensburg, Indiana, United States in Washington Township. Built in 1914, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993. The barn is part of farmstead with a circa 1940 Indiana limestone ranch house, smoke house, spring house and garage. The main drive is looped enclosing a pen with a chicken coop and smaller barn.

Bert Leedy Round Barn

The Bert Leedy Round Barn, also known as Paxton Round Barn and as Fulton County Historical Society Round Barn, is a round barn located in Richland Township near Rochester, Indiana, United States. Built in 1924, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993. The listing was consistent with terms of a National Park Service "Multiple Property Documentation" study on "Round and Polygonal Barns of Indiana" that was prepared in 1991. The Round Barn was moved to its current site, an open-air museum, in 1989 after it was struck by a tornado.

John Haimbaugh Round Barn Historic building in Indiana, US

The John Haimbaugh Round Barn in Newcastle Township near Rochester, Indiana, United States, is a round barn that was built in 1914. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993.

Kromberg Barn

The Kromberg Barn is a historic barn on East Pond Road in Smithfield, Maine. With an estimated construction date of the 1810s, it is one of the oldest barns in the area, and is architecturally rare as an example of a gambrel-roof barn built using older framing methods associated with traditional English barns. The barn was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.

Clinton D. Gilson Barn

The Clinton D. Gilson Farm is an outstanding example of a vernacular constructed farmstead for the late 19th century. The farm consists of outbuildings, the English barn, brooder houses, and a machine shop. The farm is located 3.5 miles (5.6 km) northeast of Hebron, Indiana. The Clinton D. Gilson Barn was built in 1892 and is on the National Register of Historic Places. It is the dominant structure on the Gilson Farm. A windmill was once located on the west end of the barn and an elevator on the east end.

Menno Yoder Polygonal Barn

The Menno Yoder barn is one of the two remaining poured concrete polygonal barns in the United States state of Indiana. Built on the outskirts of Shipshewana in 1908 by Menno Yoder, this twelve-sided barn has been expanded upon. It is known as the Brown Swiss Dairy barn. A gravel drive extends to the barn, passing the 1911 concrete farmhouse. The polygonal barn consists of the original 1908 twelve-sided barn, a 1911 attached silo, a c.1920 rectangular addition, and a 1960s one story addition. Next to the barn is a free standing c.1950 milk house.

Ramsay–Fox Round Barn and Farm

Ramsay–Fox Round Barn and Farm is a historic round barn and farm in West Township, Marshall County, Indiana. The farmstead was established about 1900. The round barn was built about 1911 and is a true-circular barn, with a 60-foot (18 m) diameter. It has a two-pitch gambrel roof topped by a cupola and consists of a main level and basement. Also contributing are the farm site, farmhouse, milk house, windmill, and privy.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Architectural Data Form, National Park Service, July 10, 1984. Historic American Buildings Survey, Data Pages, Thomas Ranck Round Barn. Retrieved February 8, 2007.
  2. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Thomas Ranck Round Barn, 83000030; National Register of Historic Places Inventory – Nomination Form; US Dept of the Interior, National Park Service; Washington, D.C.; January 11, 1983

Bibliography

See also