Thomas Shelby House

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Thomas Shelby House
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Location 0.25 mi. E of US 24 and MO 111, near Lexington, Missouri
Coordinates 39°10′47″N93°47′9″W / 39.17972°N 93.78583°W / 39.17972; -93.78583 Coordinates: 39°10′47″N93°47′9″W / 39.17972°N 93.78583°W / 39.17972; -93.78583
Area less than one acre
Built 1855
Architectural style Greek Revival
MPS Antebellum Resources of Johnson, Lafayette, Pettis, and Saline Counties MPS
NRHP reference # 97001429 [1]
Added to NRHP November 14, 1997

The Thomas Shelby House, also known as Kerr House, is a historic home located near Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri. It was built about 1855, and is a two-story, Greek Revival style brick I-house. It has a two-story rear ell with two-story porch. The front facade features an entry portico with tapering octagonal posts and scrollwork balustrade. [2] :5

Lexington, Missouri City in Missouri, United States

Lexington is a city in Lafayette County, Missouri, United States. The population was 4,726 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Lafayette County. Located in western Missouri, Lexington lies approximately 40 miles east of Kansas City and is part of the Greater Kansas City Metropolitan Area. It is the home of the Battle of Lexington State Historic Site, and of the former Wentworth Military Academy and College, the second-oldest military school west of the Mississippi River, opened in 1880.

Lafayette County, Missouri County in the United States

Lafayette County is a county located in the western portion of the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 33,381. Its county seat is Lexington. The county was organized November 16, 1820 from Cooper County and originally named Lillard County for James Lillard of Tennessee, who served in the first state constitutional convention and first state legislature. It was renamed Lafayette County on February 16, 1825, in honor of Revolutionary War hero the Marquis de La Fayette, who was then visiting the United States.

Greek Revival architecture architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries

The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Roger Maserang (January 1996). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thomas Shelby House" (PDF). Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved 2017-01-01. (includes 16 photographs from 1991)