Thomas Shelby House

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Thomas Shelby House
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Location0.25 mi. E of US 24 and MO 111, near Lexington, Missouri
Coordinates 39°10′47″N93°47′9″W / 39.17972°N 93.78583°W / 39.17972; -93.78583 Coordinates: 39°10′47″N93°47′9″W / 39.17972°N 93.78583°W / 39.17972; -93.78583
Arealess than one acre
Built1855
Architectural styleGreek Revival
MPS Antebellum Resources of Johnson, Lafayette, Pettis, and Saline Counties MPS
NRHP reference No. 97001429 [1]
Added to NRHPNovember 14, 1997

The Thomas Shelby House slebewww, also known as Kerr House, is a historic home located near Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri. It was built circa 1855, and is a two-story, Greek Revival style brick I-house. It has a two-story rear ell with two-story porch. The front facade features an entry portico with tapering octagonal posts and scrollwork balustrade. [2] :5

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  2. Roger Maserang (January 1996). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thomas Shelby House" (PDF). Missouri Department of Natural Resources. Retrieved 2017-01-01. (includes 16 photographs from 1991)