Thornage

Last updated

Thornage
Thornage Village Sign 30 August 2008.JPG
Thornage Village sign
Norfolk UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Thornage
Location within Norfolk
Area5.12 km2 (1.98 sq mi)
Population192 (parish, 2011 census) [1]
  Density 38/km2 (98/sq mi)
OS grid reference TG051362
  London 125 miles
Civil parish
  • Thornage
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town HOLT
Postcode district NR25
Police Norfolk
Fire Norfolk
Ambulance East of England
EU Parliament East of England
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Norfolk
52°53′07″N1°02′45″E / 52.88524°N 1.04576°E / 52.88524; 1.04576 Coordinates: 52°53′07″N1°02′45″E / 52.88524°N 1.04576°E / 52.88524; 1.04576

Thornage is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. [2] The village is 2.7 miles south-west of Holt, 23.2 miles north-west of Norwich and 11.3 miles east of Fakenham, and straddles the B1110 road between Holt and Guist. The nearest railway station is at Sheringham for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is at Norwich International Airport.

Civil parish Territorial designation and lowest tier of local government in England

In England, a civil parish is a type of administrative parish used for local government, they are a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. Civil parishes can trace their origin to the ancient system of ecclesiastical parishes which historically played a role in both civil and ecclesiastical administration; civil and religious parishes were formally split into two types in the 19th century and are now entirely separate. The unit was devised and rolled out across England in the 1860s.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Norfolk County of England

Norfolk is a county in East Anglia in England. It borders Lincolnshire to the northwest, Cambridgeshire to the west and southwest, and Suffolk to the south. Its northern and eastern boundaries are the North Sea and to the north-west, The Wash. The county town is Norwich. With an area of 2,074 square miles (5,370 km2) and a population of 859,400, Norfolk is a largely rural county with a population density of 401 per square mile. Of the county's population, 40% live in four major built up areas: Norwich (213,000), Great Yarmouth (63,000), King's Lynn (46,000) and Thetford (25,000).

Contents

History

Thornage has an entry in the Domesday Book of 1085. [3] In the great book Thornage is recorded by the name ‘’Tornedis’’, the main land holder being Bishop William. The survey also lists 3 mills.

Domesday Book 11th-century survey of landholding in England as well as the surviving manuscripts of the survey

Domesday Book is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:

Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester with his council .... After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men. Then sent he his men over all England into each shire; commissioning them to find out "How many hundreds of hides were in the shire, what land the king himself had, and what stock upon the land; or, what dues he ought to have by the year from the shire."

William de Beaufeu was a medieval Bishop of Thetford and a major landholder mentioned in the Domesday Book.

The Iron Foundry

In the 19th century there was a brass and iron foundry in the village; the foundry was run initially by John Mann, and later by his nephew, Alfred Abram, [4] and is depicted on the village sign.

Brass Alloy of copper and zinc

Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc, in proportions which can be varied to achieve varying mechanical and electrical properties. It is a substitutional alloy: atoms of the two constituents may replace each other within the same crystal structure.

Iron Chemical element with atomic number 26

Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe and atomic number 26. It is a metal that belongs to the first transition series and group 8 of the periodic table. It is by mass the most common element on Earth, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust.

Foundry factory that produces metal castings

A foundry is a factory that produces metal castings. Metals are cast into shapes by melting them into a liquid, pouring the metal into a mold, and removing the mold material after the metal has solidified as it cools. The most common metals processed are aluminium and cast iron. However, other metals, such as bronze, brass, steel, magnesium, and zinc, are also used to produce castings in foundries. In this process, parts of desired shapes and sizes can be formed.

Thornage Hall

Thornage Hall is a former grange of the Bishops of Norwich. There has been a manor house on this site since the time of the Normans. The hall was built c. 1482 by Bishop Goldwall of Norwich. After the dissolution of the monasteries the hall was given to Sir William Butts by Henry VIII. In the 17th century both ends of the Hall were demolished and remodelled, but the hall windows and doorways in the centre block were retained. In 1988 a 17th-century sewer tunnel was rediscovered. Nearby there is a large brick dovecote, dating from 1728, and barns of flint and brick dating from 1718 and 1727.

Bishop of Norwich Diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Bishop of Norwich is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Norwich in the Province of Canterbury. The diocese covers most of the county of Norfolk and part of Suffolk. The Bishop of Norwich is Graham Usher.

James Goldwell was a medieval Dean of Salisbury and Bishop of Norwich.

William Butts English doctor

Sir William Butts was a member of King Henry VIII of England's court and served as the King's physician.

Thornage Watermill

The watermill is located to the north east of the village and stands on the river Glaven whose course was altered to enable construction of the mill on a site able to hold the mill dam without flooding the surrounding area. A watermill was first recorded on this site in the Domesday Book; in the 13th century it was known as Feldmille. The present watermill, built of Norfolk red brick with a pantile roof, stopped working in 1938 and the building is now a private residence. In its working order the watermill had a breastshot 13' x 6' wheel, made entirely out of wood, which powered 4 pairs of stones driven from above and controlled by two sets of flyball governors. Three pairs of French burr stones still remained in 2011, along with some of the mill machinery, which has been incorporated into the living area of the private residence conversion.

Watermill structure that uses a water wheel or turbine to drive a mechanical process

A watermill or water mill is a mill that uses hydropower. It is a structure that uses a water wheel or water turbine to drive a mechanical process such as milling (grinding), rolling, or hammering. Such processes are needed in the production of many material goods, including flour, lumber, paper, textiles, and many metal products. These watermills may comprise gristmills, sawmills, paper mills, textile mills, hammermills, trip hammering mills, rolling mills, wire drawing mills.

River Glaven river in Norfolk, England

The River Glaven in the eastern English county of Norfolk is 10½ miles long and flows through picturesque North Norfolk countryside to the North Sea. Rising from a tiny headwater in Bodham the river starts 2½ miles before Selbrigg Pond where three streams combine at the outfall. The scenic value of the Glaven valley is important to the tourist industry in North Norfolk. The river is also 15km long and is one of over 200 chalk rivers in the world and one of 160 in the UK.

The Parish Church of All Saints

The chancel of the present Parish Church of All Saints was constructed in the early part of the 14th century. [5] The church was substantially renovated in 1898 and in 1904. Three Norman windows can be seen in the nave and the chancel. At some time the church had a south aisle, as the blocked up arcade shows. [6] Inside the church is the tomb chest of Sir William Butts, who died in 1583. His father, also named Sir William Butts , was the chief physician in the household of Henry VIII. The church's communion plate is very ancient, as is the chalice, on which are inscribed the words "was the gyfte of John Butts (or Butes), and Margaret, his wife - 1456".

Chancel space around the altar of a traditional Christian church

In church architecture, the chancel is the space around the altar, including the choir and the sanctuary, at the liturgical east end of a traditional Christian church building. It may terminate in an apse. It is generally the area used by the clergy and choir during worship, while the congregation is in the nave. Direct access may be provided by a priest's door, usually on the south side of the church. This is one definition, sometimes called the "strict" one; in practice in churches where the eastern end contains other elements such as an ambulatory and side chapels, these are also often counted as part of the chancel, especially when discussing architecture. In smaller churches, where the altar is backed by the outside east wall and there is no distinct choir, the chancel and sanctuary may be the same area. In churches with a retroquire area behind the altar, this may only be included in the broader definition of chancel.

Nave main body of a church

The nave is the central part of a church, stretching from the main entrance or rear wall, to the transepts, or in a church without transepts, to the chancel. When a church contains side aisles, as in a basilica-type building, the strict definition of the term "nave" is restricted to the central aisle. In a broader, more colloquial sense, the nave includes all areas available for the lay worshippers, including the side-aisles and transepts. Either way, the nave is distinct from the area reserved for the choir and clergy.

Henry VIII of England King of England and Ireland

Henry VIII was King of England from 1509 until his death in 1547. He was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father Henry VII. Henry is best known for his six marriages, in particular his efforts to have his first marriage annulled. His disagreement with the Pope on the question of such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England and dissolved convents and monasteries, for which he was excommunicated. Henry is also known as "the father of the Royal Navy"; he invested heavily in the Navy, increasing its size greatly from a few to more than 50 ships.

Notable people

Related Research Articles

Barton Bendish village in the United Kingdom

Barton Bendish is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 7.6 miles (12.2 km) east of Downham Market, 38.6 miles (62.1 km) west of Norwich and 14.4 miles (23.2 km) south of the town of Kings Lynn.The nearest railway station is at Downham Market for the Fen Line which runs between Cambridge and King’s Lynn. The civil parish has an area of 15.92 km² and in the 2011 census had a population of 210 in 96 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of King's Lynn and West Norfolk.

Stody village in the United Kingdom

Stody is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 13.2 miles (21.2 km) west south west of Cromer, 21.8 miles (35.1 km) north north west of Norwich and 125 miles (201 km) north north east of London. The village lies 4.1 miles (6.6 km) south west of the town of Holt. The nearest railway station is at Sheringham for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport.

Hanworth, Norfolk village and civil parish in Norfolk, England

Hanworth is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 18.8 miles (30.3 km) north of Norwich, 5.4 miles (8.7 km) south-west of Cromer and 133 miles (214 km) north-east of London. The nearest railway station is Gunton where access to the national rail network can be made via the Bittern Line to Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport.The parish had in 2001 census and 2011 census, a population of 169. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk.

Saxlingham village in United Kingdom

Saxlingham is a village that is located in the civil parish of Field Dalling in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 13.1 miles west of Cromer, 26 miles north-west of Norwich and 126 miles north-east of London. The village lies 3.6 miles west of the nearby town of Holt.The nearest railway station is at Sheringham for the Bittern Line, which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport. The town lies within North Norfolk district and for Westminster elections, the constituency of North Norfolk, currently represented by Norman Lamb, a Liberal Democrat. It is in the civil parish of Saxlingham Nethergate.

Briningham village in the United Kingdom

Briningham is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 9.9 miles east north east of the town of Fakenham, 13.3 miles west south west of Cromer, 22.3 miles north north west of the city of Norwich, and 124 miles north north east of London. The nearest railway station is at Sheringham for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. There is an abandoned railway line which is considered as a footpath, it runs parallel with an old track "the lane" that leads up to "belle vue tower". The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport. The civil parish had in 2001 census a population of 122, increasing to 130 at the 2011 census. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk.

Brinton, Norfolk village in the United Kingdom

Brinton is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 10.8 miles east-north-east of the town of Fakenham, 13.1 miles west south-west of Cromer and 125 miles north-north-east of London. The nearest railway station is at Sheringham for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport.

Edgefield, Norfolk village in the United Kingdom

Edgefield is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 13.6 miles (21.9 km) east-north-east of the town of Fakenham, 12.4 miles (20.0 km) west-south-west of Cromer and 127 miles (204 km) north-north-east of London. The nearest town is Holt which lies 3.3 miles (5.3 km) north of the village. The nearest railway station is at Sheringham for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport. The village is situated on the B1149 Norwich to Holt road. The parish had, in the 2001 census, a population of 393, reducing to 385 at the 2011 Census. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk.

Knapton village in the United Kingdom

Knapton is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 8.9 miles (14.3 km) south-east of Cromer, 19.4 miles (31.2 km) north-east of Norwich and 134 miles (216 km) north-east of London. The Village is located alongside the B1145 a route which runs between King's Lynn and Mundesley. The nearest railway station is at North Walsham for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport.

Guestwick village in the United Kingdom

Guestwick is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 19.6 miles (31.5 km) south-west of Cromer, 18.7 miles (30.1 km) north-west of Norwich and 131 miles (211 km) north-east of London. The village lies 10.2 miles (16.4 km) west of the nearby town of Aylsham. The village lies far from any High roads. The nearest railway station is at Sheringham for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport.

Honing, Norfolk village in the United Kingdom

Honing is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 15.3 miles (24.6 km) north-northeast of Norwich, 13.3 miles (21.4 km) south east of Cromer and 135 miles (217 km) north-east of London. The village lies 3.9 miles (6.3 km) east of the town of North Walsham. The nearest railway station is at Worstead on the Bittern Line which runs between Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport. The village and parish of Honing with Crostwight had in the 2001 census, a population of 319, but this fell to 312 at the 2011 Census. For the purposes of local government, the village falls within the district of North Norfolk.

Sustead village in the United Kingdom

Sustead is a small village and parish in the county of Norfolk, England, about four miles south-west of Cromer. The parish also includes the villages of Bessingham and Metton. The parish is bounded by Aldborough and Hanworth to the south, Roughton to the east, Felbrigg and Aylmerton to the north and Gresham to the west.

Banningham village in United Kingdom

Banningham is a village within the civil parish of Colby in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 2.9 miles north east of Aylsham, 14.7 miles west north of Norwich and 129 miles north east of London. The nearest railway station is at North Walsham Railway station where the Bittern Line from Cromer to Norwich can be accessed and the national rail network beyond. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport. The village lies a small distance east from the A140 Cromer to Norwich road.

Northrepps village in the United Kingdom

Northrepps is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It is 3.4 miles (5.5 km) southeast of Cromer, 22.2 miles (35.7 km) north of Norwich and 137 miles (220 km) north of London. The village lies west of the A149 which runs between Kings Lynn and Great Yarmouth. The nearest railway station is at Cromer for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport. The village and parish of Northrepps had in the 2001 census a population of 839, increasing to 886 at the 2011 Census. For the purposes of local government, the village falls within the district of North Norfolk.

Swafield village in the United Kingdom

Swafield is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 16.4 miles (26.4 km) north north east of Norwich, 10.1 miles (16.3 km) south south East of Cromer and 133 miles (214 km) north-east of London. The village lies 1.4 miles (2.3 km) north of the town of North Walsham. The village sits astride the B1145 Kings Lynn to Mundesley road that bisects North Norfolk west to east. The nearest railway station is at North Walsham for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport. The parish had in 2001 census, a population of 273, including Bradfield and increasing to 315 at the 2011 Census. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk.

Paston, Norfolk village in the United Kingdom

Paston is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 4 miles (6.4 km) north-east of North Walsham and 9.1 miles (14.6 km) south-east of Cromer. It is 19.2 miles (30.9 km) north-east of the city of Norwich. The village sits astride the coast road between Mundesley and Bacton. The nearest railway station is at North Walsham for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International.

Saxthorpe village in United Kingdom

Saxthorpe is a village in Norfolk, England. The village is 12 miles (19 km) west south west of Cromer, 16.3 miles (26.2 km) north north west of Norwich and 131 miles (211 km) north east of London. The village lies 6.2 miles (10.0 km) south west of the town of Holt. It is in the civil parish of Corpusty and Saxthorpe.

Bradfield, Norfolk village in United Kingdom

Bradfield is a village within the civil parish of Swafield, in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 7.6 miles (12.2 km) south south east of Cromer, 18.1 miles (29.1 km) north north east of Norwich and 135 miles (217 km) north east of London. The village lies 3.1 miles (5.0 km) north north west of the town of North Walsham. The nearest railway station is at Gunton for the Bittern Line which runs between Sheringham, Cromer and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport. As with some Norfolk villages, Bradfield stretches across many square miles and merges into other villages on the edges.Bradfield Cricket Club has roots dating back to the late 1800s when a group of farm workers were allowed to play cricket on one of Bradfield Hall Farm fields. Over the years the ground has developed and now boasts one of the best playing surfaces and outfields in the whole of the Norfolk Cricket Alliance

Hilborough village in the United Kingdom

Hilborough is a village and a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 5.5 miles (8.9 km) south of Swaffham, 25.4 miles (40.9 km) west-southwest of Norwich and 93.2 miles (150.0 km) north-northeast of London.

Larling village in the United Kingdom

Larling is a village and part of the civil parish of Roudham and Larling, in the English county of Norfolk. The village is 8.5 miles east north east of Thetford, 21.4 miles west south west of Norwich and 94 miles north east of London.

West Walton village in the United Kingdom

West Walton is a village and civil parish in the King's Lynn and West Norfolk District of Norfolk, England.

References

  1. "Parish population 2011" . Retrieved 31 August 2015.
  2. OS Explorer Map 24” – Norfolk Coast Central. ISBN   0-319-21726-4
  3. The Domesday Book, Englands Heritage, Then and Now, Editor: Thomas Hinde,Norfolk page 194 ISBN   1-85833-440-3
  4. The King’s England series, NORFOLK, by Arthur Mee, Pub: Hodder and Stoughton, 1972, page 306: Thornage, ISBN   0-340-15061-0
  5. Norfolk 1: Norwich and North-East, by Nikolaus Pevsner and Bill Wilson, Thornage entry, ISBN   0-300-09607-0
  6. The King’s England series, NORFOLK, by Arthur Mee,Pub:Hodder and Stoughton,1972, page 307: Thornage, ISBN   0-340-15061-0
  7. Royal College of Physicians Archive
  8. Royal College of Physicians Archive
  9. The King’s England series, NORFOLK, by Arthur Mee,Pub:Hodder and Stoughton,1972, page 306: Thornage, ISBN   0-340-15061-0