Tibial-fibular trunk

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Tibial-fibular trunk
Popliteal branches from posterior labeled.png
Picture of arteries of the lower limb, showing fibular artery and its source, the posterior tibial artery. The perforating branch of fibular artery is also shown as is the tibial-fibular trunk.
Details
Identifiers
Latin Truncus tibiofibularis
Anatomical terminology

Tibial-fibular trunk (or tibial-peroneal trunk) [1] is a segment of the artery below the knee, distal to the origin of the anterior tibial artery off the popliteal artery, and proximal to the branch point of the posterior tibial artery and the fibular artery. [2]

Related Research Articles

Popliteal artery

The popliteal artery is a deeply placed continuation of the femoral artery opening in the distal portion of the adductor magnus muscle. It courses through the popliteal fossa and ends at the lower border of the popliteus muscle, where it branches into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.

Popliteal vein Large leg vein

The popliteal vein is formed by the junction of the venae comitantes of the anterior and posterior tibial vein at the lower border of the popliteus muscle on the medial side of the popliteal artery. As it ascends through the fossa, it crosses behind the popliteal artery so that it comes to lie on its lateral side. It passes through the adductor hiatus to become the femoral vein.

In anatomy, the fibular veins are accompanying veins of the fibular artery.

The posterior tibial artery of the lower limb carries blood to the posterior compartment of the leg and plantar surface of the foot, from the popliteal artery via the tibial-fibular trunk. It is accompanied by a deep vein, the posterior tibial vein, along its course.

The anterior tibial artery of the leg carries blood to the anterior compartment of the leg and dorsal surface of the foot, from the popliteal artery.

The biceps femoris is a muscle of the thigh located to the posterior, or back. As its name implies, it has two parts, one of which forms part of the hamstrings muscle group.

Peroneus brevis muscle

The peroneus brevis muscle lies under cover of the peroneus longus, and is the shorter and smaller of the peroneus muscles.

Sacral plexus

In human anatomy, the sacral plexus is a nerve plexus which provides motor and sensory nerves for the posterior thigh, most of the lower leg and foot, and part of the pelvis. It is part of the lumbosacral plexus and emerges from the lumbar vertebrae and sacral vertebrae (L4-S4). A sacral plexopathy is a disorder affecting the nerves of the sacral plexus, usually caused by trauma, nerve compression, vascular disease, or infection. Symptoms may include pain, loss of motor control, and sensory deficits.

The common fibular nerve is a nerve in the lower leg that provides sensation over the posterolateral part of the leg and the knee joint. It divides at the knee into two terminal branches: the superficial fibular nerve and deep fibular nerve, which innervate the muscles of the lateral and anterior compartments of the leg respectively. When the common fibular nerve is damaged or compressed, foot drop can insue.

Popliteal fossa The back of your knee

The popliteal fossa is a shallow depression located at the back of the knee joint. The bones of the popliteal fossa are the femur and the tibia. Like other flexion surfaces of large joints, it is an area where blood vessels and nerves pass relatively superficially, and with an increased amount of lymph nodes.

The sural nerve is a sensory nerve in the calf region (sura) of the leg. It is made up of branches of the tibial nerve and common fibular nerve, the medial cutaneous branch from the tibial nerve, and the lateral cutaneous branch from the common fibular nerve. Once formed, the nerves runs down the mid calf to the ankle and along the skin from the mid-posterior popliteal fossa to just behind to the lateral malleolus and then under the malleolus and forward along the lateral aspect of the foot.

Anterior tibial recurrent artery

The anterior tibial recurrent artery is a small artery in the leg. It arises from the anterior tibial artery, as soon as that vessel has passed through the interosseous space. It ascends in the tibialis anterior muscle, ramifies on the front and sides of the knee-joint, and assists in the formation of the patellar plexus by anastomosing with the genicular branches of the popliteal, and with the highest genicular artery.

The posterior tibial recurrent artery, an inconstant branch, is given off from the anterior tibial before that vessel passes through the gap between superior tibio-fibular joint and upper border of interosseous membrane.

Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome

The popliteal artery entrapment syndrome is a rather uncommon pathology, which results in claudication and chronic leg ischemia. The popliteal artery may be compressed behind the knee, due to congenital deformity of the muscles or tendon insertions of the popliteal fossa. This repetitive trauma may result in stenotic artery degeneration, complete artery occlusion or even formation of an aneurysm.

Anterior compartment of leg part of the Fascial compartments of leg

The anterior compartment of the leg is a fascial compartment of the lower limb. It contains muscles that produce dorsiflexion and participate in inversion and eversion of the foot, as well as vascular and nervous elements including the anterior tibial artery and veins, and the deep fibular nerve.

Posterior compartment of thigh

The posterior compartment of the thigh is one of the fascial compartments that contains the knee flexors and hip extensors known as the hamstring muscles, as well as vascular and nervous elements, particularly the sciatic nerve.

The circumflex fibular artery is a branch of the anterior tibial artery which supplies blood to the knee.

Fibular artery

In anatomy, the peroneal artery supplies blood to the lateral compartment of the leg. It arises from the tibial-fibular trunk.

References

  1. "GE Healthcare-Brochure -Arterial Duplex Imaging: Lower Extremity" . Retrieved 2008-01-08.
  2. Day C, Orme R (2006). "Popliteal artery branching patterns -- an angiographic study". Clin Radiol. 61 (8): 696–9. doi:10.1016/j.crad.2006.03.014. PMID   16843754.