Tini Beg

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Tini Beg
تینی بک
Facial Chronicle - b.07, p.461 - Tinibek enthroned.jpg
Tinibeg as depicted in the Illustrated Chronicle of Ivan the Terrible (16th century)
Khan of the Golden Horde
Western Half (Blue Horde)
Reign1341–1342
Predecessor Öz Beg Khan
Successor Jani Beg
Bornunknown date
Golden Horde
Died1342
Sarai
House Borjigin
Dynasty Golden Horde
Father Öz Beg Khan
Mother Taydula Khatun
Religion Islam

Tini Beg (Turki/Kypchak: تینی بک; died 1342), also known as Dinibeg, was Khan of the Golden Horde from 1341 to 1342.

Contents

Biography

He was born to Öz Beg Khan and his principal wife Taydula Khatun. [1] He was appointed as governor of White Horde in c. 1328. Muslim sources such as Ibn Battuta claimed that he was the most favored son of Ozbeg and was designated as heir. [2] He became the expected heir after his elder brother Timur Beg's death in 1330. [3] The poet Qutb translated Nizami's "Khosrow and Shirin" for Tini Beg and his wife Malika Khatun. During his reign Volhynia was lost to Grand Duchy of Lithuania. Tini Beg was away, fighting against Chagatai raiders on the eastern border or White Horde of Jochid ulus, when his father Öz Beg died in 1341. Tini Beg's younger brother Jani Beg served as regent, aided by their mother Taydula Khatun. In obscure circumstances, Jani Beg had another of Öz Beg's sons, Khiḍr Beg, killed. When Taydula heard that Tini Beg was on his way back to the court in 1342, fearing for Jani Beg, she incited the emirs to kill Tini Beg, at Saray-Jük. Jani Beg succeeded as khan. [4]

Legacy

Tini Beg was remembered as more suitable man for the throne by Ibn Battuta. [2] He was considered pro-Christian [5] and received some letters from Benedict XII, who encouraged him to convert Christianity. [6]

Marriage

He had at least two wives:

Depiction in modern culture

Films

See also

Related Research Articles

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Sultan Giyasuddin Muhammad Uzbek Khan, better known as Uzbeg, Uzbek or Ozbeg (1282–1341), was the longest-reigning khan of the Golden Horde (1313–1341), under whose rule the state reached its zenith. He was succeeded by his son Tini Beg. He was the son of Toghrilcha and grandson of Mengu-Timur, who had been khan of the Golden Horde from 1267 to 1280. Hence, he was a direct descendant of Genghis Khan.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Nawruz Beg</span>

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jalal al-Din Khan ibn Tokhtamysh</span>

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Timur (Golden Horde)</span>

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References

  1. Gibb, H. A. R. (trans.), The Travels of Ibn Baṭṭūṭa A. D. 1325-1354. Vol. 2. Cambridge, 1962: 486; Howorth, H. H., History of the Mongols from the 9th to the 19th Century. Part II.1. London, 1880: 172 speculates that Tini Beg's mother's name was Sheritumgha Khatun, but this is contradicted by the primary sources.
  2. 1 2 Gibb, H. A. R. (2017-07-05). The Travels of Ibn Battuta, A.D. 1325-1354: Volume II. 490: Routledge. ISBN   978-1-351-53992-0.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location (link)
  3. Seleznëv, J. V., Èlita Zolotoj Ordy, Kazan', 2009: 74.
  4. Gibb, H. A. R. (trans.), The Travels of Ibn Baṭṭūṭa A. D. 1325-1354. Vol. 2. Cambridge, 1962: 490; Seleznëv, J. V., Èlita Zolotoj Ordy, Kazan', 2009: 69, 74.
  5. Spuler, Bertold (1969). The Muslim world: a historical survey. Brill Archive. p. 54.
  6. Ryan, James D. (1998). "Christian Wives of Mongol Khans: Tartar Queens and Missionary Expectations in Asia". Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society. 8 (3): 411–421. doi:10.1017/S1356186300010506. ISSN   1356-1863. JSTOR   25183572. S2CID   162220753.
  7. "HÜSREV ü ŞÎRÎN - TDV İslâm Ansiklopedisi". TDV İslam Ansiklopedisi (in Turkish). Retrieved 2021-01-10.
  8. Ta'rīkh-i Shaikh Uwais : (History of Shaikh Uais) : Am important source for the history of Adharbaijān in the fourteenth century. p. 58.

Sources

Preceded by Khan of the Golden Horde
1341–1342
Succeeded by