Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow

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Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow
Pandora Tomorrow box art.jpg
Developer(s)
Publisher(s) Ubisoft [lower-alpha 1]
Producer(s) Domitille Doat-Le Bigot
Designer(s) Denis Muffat-Meridol
Programmer(s) Wu Ming Jie
Artist(s) Frederic Lavignasse
Writer(s) J. T. Petty
Composer(s)
Series Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell
Engine Unreal Engine 2.0
Platform(s)
Release
March 23, 2004
  • Game Boy Advance, Xbox
    Microsoft Windows
    Mobile
    • WW: March 29, 2004 [5]
    PlayStation 2
    GameCube
    PlayStation 3
    • PAL: September 16, 2011
    • NA: September 27, 2011
Genre(s) Stealth
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer

Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow is a 2004 stealth game developed and published by Ubisoft Shanghai and Ubisoft Milan. The game is the sequel to Splinter Cell and the second game in the Splinter Cell series endorsed by writer Tom Clancy. It follows the covert activities of Sam Fisher, an agent working for a black-ops branch of the National Security Agency (NSA) called "Third Echelon". Michael Ironside returns to voice Sam Fisher, while Dennis Haysbert voices the character Irving Lambert, Fisher's boss, making this the only time he is not voiced by Don Jordan. Lalo Schifrin provides the theme music for the game.

Contents

Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow received mostly positive reviews on release, with critics calling it a strong follow-up and praising its multiplayer component, which would become a staple of the series. A side-scrolling adaptation for Game Boy Advance and mobile phones was released to mixed reception. A remastered high definition version was released on PlayStation 3 in September 2011. A sequel, titled Chaos Theory , released in 2005.

Gameplay

Sam Fisher, the game's protagonist, in a camouflage suit during a mission in Pandora Tomorrow Fisher camo-suit scpt.jpg
Sam Fisher, the game's protagonist, in a camouflage suit during a mission in Pandora Tomorrow

The gameplay of Pandora Tomorrow is largely unchanged from the original Splinter Cell. The game features some moderate graphical improvements, as well as minor gameplay changes such as the fact that health kits are no longer an inventory item, and the addition of a laser sight to Sam's pistol that allows the player to know exactly where the rounds will strike, even when moving around. Also, Sam can now whistle to attract enemies, open doors while carrying a body, shoot while hanging upside down, perform a "SWAT turn" to go past doorways unnoticed (move from one side of the door to other while covered), and perform a half split jump. In Chaos Theory, the next entry in the series, the SWAT turn was removed and the pistol laser was replaced with an OCP (Optically Channeled Potentiator) which can temporarily disable electronic devices. The PlayStation 2 and GameCube versions of Pandora Tomorrow also feature an additional single-player mission to compensate for the abridged gameplay compared to the PC and Xbox versions.

Plot

In March 2006, the United States establishes a military presence in the newly-independent country of East Timor to train its military. Several anti-separatist Indonesian guerrilla militias oppose Timor's formation, one of which is Darah Dan Doa (English: Blood and Prayer) led by Suhadi Sadono - an individual trained by the CIA to fight communism in the region, who has grown resentful of U.S. suport for Timor's independance. Following an attack on the U.S. embassy in Dili, which captures a number of U.S. military and diplomatic personnel, NSA's Third Echelon investigates the situation, after its director, Lambert Irving, informs operative Sam Fisher that his old friend Douglas Shetland, a former soldier turned PMC owner, is among the hostages. Infiltrating the embassy, Fisher learns from Douglas and CIA operative Ingrid Karlthson that Sadono is working alongside an unknown individual identified as "Mortified Penguin", conducting business in Paris.

After the embassy hostages are rescued, the U.S. Army launches a military campaign against Darah Dan Doa, though Indonesia objects to their operations. Meanwhile, Fisher heads to Paris, and finds mercenaries hired by Mortified breaking into a cyrogenic lab, and stealing ND133 containers - self-contained cryogenic containers used for transporting and storing human brains. Third Echelon identifies Mortified as Norman Soth, a former U.S. soldier turned CIA agent, who Fisher discovers has gone rogue. Learning he has made a deal with Syrian terrorists operating in Jerusalem, Third Echelon co-ordiate with Israel's Shin Bet agents, and learn Soth purchased containers of manufactured smallpox virus, intending to use them in bio-weapons. Shin Bet later betray Third Echelon, forcing Fisher to prevent them securing a container of the bio-weapon from an seized ND133. Lambert later discovers the bio-weapons are an insurance policy for Sadano, codenamed "Pandora Tomorrow" - if he is killed or captured by the U.S., the weapons will detonate on U.S. soil and expose Americans to the virus.

With this threat, Sadano makes appearances on the front lines, forcing U.S. troops to be pulled back to avoid confrontations with him. Third Echelon, however, learn that Sadano has to make daily calls to ensure the bio-weapons are not detonated prematurely. Lambert assigns Fisher to bug the calls, so that they can be traced to Soth's mercenary cells guarding the ND133, with aid from Douglas' PMC outfit, Displace International. The traced calls swiftly allow Third Echelon to inform the NSA, who send agents out to find and neutralize all but one of the ND133s. this in turn allows the U.S. army to launch renewed operations against Darah Dan Doa guerillas forcing Sadono to withdraw from the front lines. Not wishing a repeat "Nikoladze affair" in 2004, Lambert instructs Fisher to find and capture Sadano, and hand him over to the CIA, leading him to work alongside Ingrid in seizing the guerilla leader at a television studio. Sadano's capture ends the conflict, and strengths diplomatic ties between the U.S. and East Timor.

Despite their success, Third Echelon continues its hunt for the last smallpox-armed ND133, and discovers Soth and his mercenaries have it, intending to detonate it inside Los Angeles International Airport. Lambert reveals Soth's actions were not motivated by Indonesa, but by a perceived betrayal from the United States for an the incident that saw him lose one of his legs, and is simply seeking revenge for this. At the airport, Fisher infiltrates the terminal building, killing Soth and his men, many of who disguise themselves as airport workers. Securing the ND133, Fisher finds the timer has been activated, and so, disguised as a maintenance worker, he sets the device near to two policemen, who notice it, evacuate the area, and call in Los Angeles Police Department's bomb squad to perform a controlled explosion of the device, safely neutralizing the threat. Outside the terminal building, Fisher disgards his disguise and leaves for home.

Development

Pandora Tomorrow was developed under the title of Shadow Strike. [11] Much of the game itself was built upon the original engine of the first game, but with notable efforts to improve on it with newer elements, including some changes to the gameplay, and additional moves that could be used in the movement and stealth elements of the game. Compared to the Xbox version, development of additional console versions for the PlayStation 2 and Gamecube were created, but gameplay had to be reconfigured towards an abridged style of gameplay. To compensate, developers established an additional mission for both versions that was not made for Xbox.

Windows version

As with the original Splinter Cell, development of the Windows version focused on being a port of the Xbox version, duplicating its user interface and gameplay. However, the Windows version was designed to run at higher resolutions than the console versions, with the "checkpoint" save system from the Xbox version was replaced with the ability to save a game at any time, and the controls reworked to allow simultaneous use of a keyboard and mouse, with movement speed being controlled by the mouse wheel. None of the bonus content from the other versions was made present for Windows.

Playstation 3

A PlayStation 3 version via PlayStation Network was announced on December 20, 2010 to be part of the Splinter Cell Trilogy which was released in September 2011 as part of Sony's Classics HD series. [12] It was revealed on the PlayStation Blog that the game is a port of the PC version, which had better graphical detail than previous console versions. [13] It was also revealed that the multiplayer modes are not included in the collection. [14]

Game Boy Advance

The GBA version was released on March 26, 2004 in Europe and March 27, 2004 in North America.

Reception

Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow received "universal acclaim" from critics for the Xbox version, while the PC, PS2, and GameCube received "generally favorable" reviews, and the Game Boy Advance received "mixed or average" reviews, according to review aggregator website Metacritic. [64] In addition, Rotten Tomatoes gave the game a score of 100% "Fresh Rating" for the Xbox version; [65] a 95% "Fresh Rating" for the PS2 version; [66] a 90% "Fresh Rating" for the PC version; [67] a 55% "Rotten Rating" for the GameCube version; [68] and a 27% "Rotten Rating" for the GBA version. [69]

Greg Kasavin of GameSpot gave the Xbox and PC versions a score of 9.1 and said that the single-player and multiplayer portions of the game will appeal to anyone interested in high-tech stealth and subterfuge. He also said that players familiar with the first Splinter Cell should expect 10 hours or more of gameplay. Kasavin said the storyline in Pandora Tomorrow was more cohesive than the original Splinter Cell, but the gameplay often becomes pure trial and error, noting that the missions "could have benefited from feeling less rigid and scripted" but were "incredibly slick." Kasavin also praised the multiplayer mode for its innovation, complexity, and creativity. [37] Mongoose of Game Chronicles Magazine also gave the Xbox version a 9.4 out of 10 and gave special praise to the multiplayer portion of the game. He called the game "the single best reason to get online" on Xbox Live. However, he felt that gameplay in the single player campaign at times got increasingly linear and leaned toward scripted challenges, with "only one solution to any given problem", requiring "the use of a particular gadget or one of Sam’s nimble moves." [70]

Entertainment Weekly gave the Xbox version an A and said that it "seems less like a sequel and more like an extension of the first game, with a few nice enhancements and some more dark and dangerous environments." [62] Playboy gave the game 100% and stated that "A new online mode allows four players to stalk one another. Take an opponent hostage and use your headset to describe all the pain you plan to inflict on him." [71] The Times gave it all five stars and called it "a miniature masterpiece". [63] The Village Voice gave the Xbox version a perfect ten and said, "No multiplayer title has ever bound and balanced two wholly different games this way." [72]

Sales

By the end of March 2004, Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Pandora Tomorrow had sold 1.7 million copies. [73] Its total sales reached 2.7 million units by the end of June, [74] and rose to 2.8 million by September. [75]

Awards

GameSpot named Pandora Tomorrow the best Xbox game of March 2004. [76] The editors of Computer Gaming World nominated Pandora Tomorrow for their 2004 "Action Game of the Year" award, which ultimately went to The Chronicles of Riddick: Escape from Butcher Bay . [77] During the 8th Annual Interactive Achievement Awards, the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences awarded Pandora Tomorrow with "Computer Action/Adventure Game of the Year". [78]

Notes

  1. Mobile version developed and published by Gameloft.

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