United States Court of Military Appeals (building)

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United States Court of Military Appeals
United States Court of Military Appeals.jpg
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Location450 E St., NW., Washington, D.C.
Coordinates 38°53′45″N77°01′06″W / 38.8958°N 77.0183°W / 38.8958; -77.0183 Coordinates: 38°53′45″N77°01′06″W / 38.8958°N 77.0183°W / 38.8958; -77.0183
Built1910
Architect Woods, Elliot
NRHP reference No. 74002174 [1]
Added to NRHPJanuary 21, 1974

The building of the United States Court of Military Appeals, formerly known as the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, is a historic building located at 450 E St., Northwest, Washington, D.C.. It is regarded as "a particularly fine and remarkably early example of revived (20th century) Greek Revival architecture." [2] :4

History

The building was completed in 1910. It served as the D.C. Court of Appeals until 1952, when the U.S. Court of Military Appeals took it over. It was designed by the Architect of the Capitol, Elliott Woods, to be compatible with the Washington City Hall (1820), designed by George Hadfield and Robert Mills. [2]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. [1]

When nominated in 1973, it was serving the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. April 15, 2008.
  2. 1 2 John D. Milne (June 22, 1973). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: United States Court of Military Appeals / District of Columbia Court of Appeals". National Park Service . Retrieved September 10, 2016. with three photos from 1973