Watkins House (Searcy, Arkansas)

Last updated
Watkins House
Watkins House.JPG
USA Arkansas location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location 1208 E. Race St., Searcy, Arkansas
Coordinates 35°15′3″N91°43′25″W / 35.25083°N 91.72361°W / 35.25083; -91.72361 Coordinates: 35°15′3″N91°43′25″W / 35.25083°N 91.72361°W / 35.25083; -91.72361
Area less than one acre
Built 1919 (1919)
Architectural style Colonial Revival, Bungalow/craftsman
MPS White County MPS
NRHP reference # 91001182 [1]
Added to NRHP September 5, 1991

The Watkins House is a historic house at 1208 East Race Street in Searcy, Arkansas. It is a two-story wood frame structure, with a side gambrel roof and original stucco exterior. A single-story ell extends to the left, and a similarly-sized carport extends to the right. The gambrel nature of the roof is somewhat obscured by the large shed-roof dormer that extends across most of the front. Built 1919-20, it is one of a small number of Colonial Revival houses in the community. [2]

Searcy, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Searcy is the largest city and county seat of White County, Arkansas, United States. According to 2014 Census Bureau estimates, the population of the city is 23,768. It is the principal city of the Searcy, AR Micropolitan Statistical Area which encompasses all of White County. The city takes its name from Richard Searcy, a judge for the Superior Court of the Arkansas Territory. A college town, Searcy is the home of Harding University and ASU-Searcy.

The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1991. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in White County, Arkansas Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in White County, Arkansas.

Related Research Articles

Ballou House

The Ballou House is an historic house on Albion Road in Lincoln, Rhode Island. It is a 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, five bays wide, with a large central chimney. A single-story gable-roof wing extends to the east, and a 20th-century gambrel-roofed ell extends to the north. The house was probably built c. 1782 by Moses Ballou, from one of the first families to settle in the area, and was owned by his descendants through most of the 19th century.

Martin House and Farm building in Massachusetts, United States

The Martin House and Farm is a historic farm at 22 Stoney Hill Road in North Swansea, Massachusetts. The main house is a 1-1/2 story gambrel-roofed wood frame structure, with a crosswise ell at the rear. The oldest portion was built in 1728 by John Martin, as a single pile structure with a gable roof. It was soon afterward extended with a kitchen space, and was enlarged about 1814, when the gambrel roof was added. The property was farmed by Martin's descendants until 1934, when the property was bequested to The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America. The house is operated by the Dames as a historic house museum. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

James Nichols House building in Massachusetts, United States

The James Nichols House is a historic house at 273 Pearl Street in Reading, Massachusetts. Built c. 1795, this 1-1/2 story gambrel-roofed house is built in a vernacular Georgian style, and is a rare local example of the style. The house was built by a local shoemaker and farmer who was involved in a religious dispute that divided the town. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

House at 32 Morrison Road

The House at 32 Morrison Road in Wakefield, Massachusetts is a well-preserved, architecturally eclectic, house in the Wakefield Park section of town. The ​2 12-story wood-frame house features a gambrel roof with a cross gable gambrel section. Set in the front gable end is a Palladian window arrangement. The porch has a fieldstone apron, with Ionic columns supporting a pedimented roof. Above the front entry rises a two-story turret with conical roof. The house was built c. 1906–08, as part of the Wakefield Park subdivision begun in the 1880s by J.S. Merrill.

Thomas Harrison House (Branford, Connecticut)

The Thomas Harrison House is a historic house at 23 North Harbor Street in Branford, Connecticut. Probably built before 1723, it is one of the town's small number of surviving 18th-century houses, that is further distinctive because of its gambrel roof. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

Oliver House (Corning, Arkansas)

The Oliver House is a historic house at 203 West Front Street in Corning, Arkansas. It is a ​2 12-story wood-frame L-shaped structure, with a gambrel-roofed main block and a gable-roofed section projecting forward from the right side. A single-story hip-roofed porch extends through the crook of the L and around to the sides, supported by Tuscan columns. The interior retains original woodwork, including two particularly distinguished fireplace mantels. Built c. 1880 and last significantly altered in 1909, it is one of Corning's oldest buildings. It was built by J. W. Harb, and purchased not long afterward by Dr. J. L. Oliver Jr., whose son operated a general store nearby.

Croxson House

The Croxson House is a historic house at 1901 Gaines Street in Little Rock, Arkansas. It is a two-story frame structure, with a side gambrel roof that has wide shed-roof dormers, and clapboard siding. A porch extends across the front, supported by heavy Tuscan columns, with brackets lining its eave. The house was built in 1908 to a design by the noted Arkansas architect Charles L. Thompson. It is well-preserved example of Thompson's Dutch Colonial designs.

Fordyce House (Hot Springs, Arkansas)

The Fordyce House is a historic house at 746 Park Avenue in Hot Springs, Arkansas. It is a 1-1/2 story wood frame structure, with a hip roof that has large cross-gabled gambrel dormers projecting in each direction. It has a curved wraparound porch supported by Tuscan columns. It was built in 1910 to a design by architect Charles L. Thompson, and is an excellent local example of Colonial Revival architecture.

Mount Pleasant Methodist Church church building in Arkansas, United States of America

Mount Pleasant Methodist Church is historic Methodist church in Waldron, Arkansas. It is a single-story wood-frame structure, originally built in 1891 on land donated by Joseph Self, a locally prominent farmer. The church is finished in weatherboard, and has a steeply pitched gable roof, with a bell tower at the front (north) end. A shed-roof addition extends to the south (rear) of the building. The interior features a distinctive gambrel ceiling, finished in flush pine boards painted white.

Crenshaw-Burleigh House

The Crenshaw-Burleigh House is a historic house at 108 North Main Street in Dermott, Arkansas. The two story wood frame house was built in 1903 to replace the Crenshaw house that burned in 1902, and is a distinctive early example of Colonial Revival architecture. Its first owner was Anna Crawford Crenshaw, granddaughter of Hon William Harris Crawford; its second owners were James Sherer Burleigh and Mattie Crenshaw Burleigh. The house has a gambrel roof with cross gables, and a wraparound porch supported by Tuscan columns. The second floor, built into the steep section of the gambrel roof has gable dormers with architrave surrounds. An elevator was added by the Burleighs after Sherer had a heart attack. Mattie Burleigh lived here until her death in 1970.

Hemingway House and Barn (Fayetteville, Arkansas)

The Hemingway House and Barn is a historic summer estate at 3310 Old Missouri Road in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The house is a two-story wood-frame gambrel-roofed structure, set in a landscape designed by Little Rock architect Charles L. Thompson. The house and barn were built for Elwin Hemingway, a local lawyer. The barn, located just southwest of the house, is believed to be the only architect-designed structure of its type in the state.

Blunt House Livestock Barn

The Blunt House Livestock Barn is a historic barn in rural White County, Arkansas. It is located on the north side of County Road 94, west of the hamlet of Midway. It is a wood frame structure 1-1/2 stories in height, with a gambrel roof and a shed-roof ha storage extension to the east. It is finished in board-and-batten siding; its roof is corrugated metal. Built c. 1920, it is the county's best example of barns built between about 1914 and 1939. The barn is somewhat rare, as gambrel roofs were not commonly used in barn construction in the county before 1930.

Guy Bartley House

The Guy Bartley House is a historic house at the northeast corner of Elm and Fifth Streets in Leslie, Arkansas. It is a two-story wood frame structure, with a gambrel roof and wood shingle siding. A single-story porch wraps around one side of the house, and has apparently been partly enclosed. The front and rear roof elevations each have large gabled wall dormers. Built in 1906, the house is a regionally unusual example of Colonial Revival architecture in with stylistic elements more commonly found in New England.

Louis N. Hilger Homestead, Livestock Barn

The Louis N. Hilger Homestead/Livestock Barn is a historic barn in rural northern White County, Arkansas. It is located on the south side of County Road 374, west of Providence. It is a two-story wood frame structure, with a gambrel roof, board-and-batten siding, and a concrete foundation. It has a transverse crib layout, with a livestock shed extending along one side. It has two shed-roof dormers on the east side, providing light to the interior. It was built in 1939 to house mules used as draught animals for the Hilger dairy operation, and is distinctive within the county for its use of dormers and its extraordinary height, made possible by its braced-frame construction.

Gatewood House (Malvern, Arkansas)

The Gatewood House is a historic house at 235 Pine Bluff Street in Malvern, Arkansas. It is a two-story wood frame structure, roughly rectangular in plan, with a gambrel roof and weatherboard exterior. The gambrel roof is unusual in that the upper level slightly overhangs the steeper lower parts. The front-facing gable rests above a polygonal bay window on the left and a recessed porch on the right, which is supported by clustered Tuscan columns. Built in 1905, the building represents a well-executed example of a vernacular interpretation of the Shingle style of architecture.

Trulock-Cook House

The Trulock-Cook House is a historic house at 703 West 2nd Avenue in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. It is a 1-1/2 story wood frame structure, built about 1903 in an unusual combination of Shingle and Colonial Revival styles. It has a two-stage gambrel roof, which slopes down in one section to form the roof of a single-story porch that wraps around the porch on the southwest corner. The porch also wraps around a semicircular bay that rises above the main entrance, and is supported by Tuscan columns. The house is one of Pine Bluff's few surviving Shingle style buildings.

Howard ONeal Barn

The Howard O'Neal Barn was a historic barn near Russell, Arkansas. It was located southeast of the city off Roetzel Road. It was a two-story wood frame structure, with a gambrel roof. In layout it has a transverse crib plan, and was designed to house equipment, farm animals, and feed. Built about 1938, it was a good example of a period barn in White County.

Tom Watkins House

The Tom Watkins House is a historic house at Oak and Race Streets in Searcy, Arkansas. It is a two-story brick structure, with a cross-gabled tile roof and a concrete foundation. A porch extends across part of the front and beyond the left side, forming a carport. The main roof and porch roof both feature exposed rafter tails in the Craftsman style, and there are small triangular brackets in the gable ends. The house, a fine local example of Craftsman architecture, was built about 1920 to a design by Charles L. Thompson.

Reid House (Little Rock, Arkansas)

The Reid House is a historic house at 1425 Kavanaugh Street in Little Rock, Arkansas. It is a large two-story wood frame structure, built in 1911 in the Dutch Colonial style to a design by architect Charles L. Thompson. It has a side-gable gambrel roof that extends over the front porch, with shed-roof ]]dormer]]s containing bands of sash windows flanking a large projecting gambreled section. The porch is supported by stone piers, and extends left of the house to form a porte-cochere.

Munger House

The Munger House is a historic house in rural eastern Johnson County, Arkansas. It is located east of Lamar, on the west side of County Road 3851, about 0.25 miles (0.40 km) north of the Pope County line. It is a two-story masonry structure, built out of uncoursed fieldstone and topped by a Dutch Colonial gambrel roof with shed dormers. The roof overhangs a recessed porch supported by square columns. The house interior retains original features, including Art Nouveau light fixtures. It was built in 1934 for Hubert and Vera Munger, and is the area's finest example of Dutch Colonial architecture.

References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "NRHP nomination for Watkins House" (PDF). Arkansas Preservation. Retrieved 2016-01-30.