Watson House (Charlestown, Indiana)

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Watson House
Watson House in Charlestown.jpg
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Location1015 Water St., Charlestown, Indiana
Coordinates 38°26′43″N85°39′39″W / 38.44528°N 85.66083°W / 38.44528; -85.66083 Coordinates: 38°26′43″N85°39′39″W / 38.44528°N 85.66083°W / 38.44528; -85.66083
Arealess than one acre
Builtc. 1900 (1900)
Architectural styleColonial Revival, Queen Anne
NRHP reference # 83000051 [1]
Added to NRHPSeptember 1, 1983

The Watson House, also known as the Coombs House, is a historic home located just east of Charlestown, Indiana's town square. It was built about 1900, and is a two-story, rectangular frame dwelling with Queen Anne and Colonial Revival style design elements. It features a full-width front porch supported by slender columns. [2] :2 Originally located on the site was the James Bigger-built Green Tree Tavern (1812), where Jonathan Jennings, the first governor of Indiana, was given an Inaugural Ball in 1816.

Charlestown, Indiana City in Indiana, United States

Charlestown is a city in Clark County, Indiana, United States. The population was 7,585 at the 2010 census.

Queen Anne style architecture architectural style

The Queen Anne style in Britain refers to either the English Baroque architectural style approximately of the reign of Queen Anne, or a revived form that was popular in the last quarter of the 19th century and the early decades of the 20th century. In British architecture the term is mostly used of domestic buildings up to the size of a manor house, and usually designed elegantly but simply by local builders or architects, rather than the grand palaces of noble magnates. Contrary to the American usage of the term, it is characterised by strongly bilateral symmetry with an Italianate or Palladian-derived pediment on the front formal elevation.

Colonial Revival architecture

Colonial Revival architecture was and is a nationalistic design movement in the United States and Canada; it seeks to revive elements of architectural style, garden design, and interior design of American colonial architecture.

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. [1]

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  2. "Indiana State Historic Architectural and Archaeological Research Database (SHAARD)" (Searchable database). Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology. Retrieved 2015-08-01.Note: This includes Bonny E. Wise (May 1983). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Watson House" (PDF). Retrieved 2015-08-01. and Accompanying photographs.