Watson Park Historic District

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Watson Park Historic District

Watson Park, 37th Street.jpg

Watson Park, 37th Street, April 2012
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Location Roughly bounded by 38th St., Watson Rd., and Birchwood, Fairfield, and Central Aves., Indianapolis, Indiana
Coordinates 39°49′20″N86°08′40″W / 39.82222°N 86.14444°W / 39.82222; -86.14444 Coordinates: 39°49′20″N86°08′40″W / 39.82222°N 86.14444°W / 39.82222; -86.14444
Area 110 acres (45 ha)
Built 1910 (1910)
Built by Emerson Chaille & Company; Jose-Kuhn Lumber Company
Architect Architect's Small House Service Bureau
Architectural style Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals, Bungalow/craftsman
NRHP reference # 12000336 [1]
Added to NRHP June 19, 2012

Watson Park Historic District, also known as Watson Road Historic District and Watson McCord Neighborhood, is a national historic district located at Indianapolis, Indiana. The district encompasses 402 contributing buildings and 4 contributing sites in a predominantly residential section of Indianapolis. They include 255 houses, 27 multiple family dwellings, and 120 garages. It was developed between about 1910 and 1960, and includes representative examples of Colonial Revival, Tudor Revival, and Bungalow / American Craftsman style architecture. Located in the district is the Watson Park Bird Sanctuary. [2]

Colonial Revival architecture

Colonial Revival architecture was and is a nationalistic design movement in the United States and Canada. Part of a broader Colonial Revival Movement embracing Georgian and Neoclassical styles, it seeks to revive elements of architectural style, garden design, and interior design of American colonial architecture.

Tudor Revival architecture architectural style

Tudor Revival architecture first manifested itself in domestic architecture beginning in the United Kingdom in the mid to late 19th century based on a revival of aspects of Tudor architecture or, more often, the style of English vernacular architecture of the Middle Ages that survived into the Tudor period. It later became an influence in some other countries, especially the British colonies. For example, in New Zealand, the architect Francis Petre adapted the style for the local climate. Elsewhere in Singapore, then a British colony, architects such as R. A. J. Bidwell pioneered what became known as the Black and White House. The earliest examples of the style originate with the works of such eminent architects as Norman Shaw and George Devey, in what at the time was thought of as a neo-Tudor design.

Bungalow type of building, originally developed in the Bengal region in South Asia, but now found throughout the world

A bungalow is a type of building, originally developed in the Bengal region of the subcontinent. The meaning of the word bungalow varies internationally. Common features of many bungalows include verandas and being low-rise. In Australia, the California bungalow associated with the United States was popular after the First World War. In North America and the United Kingdom, a bungalow today is a house, normally detached, that may contain a small loft. It is either single-story or has a second story built into a sloping roof, usually with dormer windows.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2012. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 6/25/12 through 6/29/12. National Park Service. 2012-07-06.
  2. "Indiana State Historic Architectural and Archaeological Research Database (SHAARD)" (Searchable database). Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology. Retrieved 2016-08-01.Note: This includes Connie J. Ziegler (September 2010). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Watson Park Historic District" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-08-01. and Accompanying photographs