Waverly (Burnt Chimney, Virginia)

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Waverly

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Location 1605 Cahas Mountain Rd., near Burnt Chimney, Virginia
Coordinates 37°7′10″N79°47′28″W / 37.11944°N 79.79111°W / 37.11944; -79.79111 Coordinates: 37°7′10″N79°47′28″W / 37.11944°N 79.79111°W / 37.11944; -79.79111
Area 8.4 acres (3.4 ha)
Built 1858 (1858)
Built by Seth Richardson
Architectural style Greek Revival
NRHP reference # 96001329 [1]
VLR # 033-0028
Significant dates
Added to NRHP November 7, 1996
Designated VLR June 19, 1996 [2]

Waverly is a historic home and farm located near Burnt Chimney, Franklin County, Virginia. It was built about 1858, and is the two-story, central passage plan, frame dwelling in the Greek Revival style. It measures approximately 52 feet by 38 feet and sits on a brick foundation. Also on the property are a contributing meathouse and a foundation, icehouse ruins, and the remains of the 19th century landscaping. [3]

Burnt Chimney, Virginia Unincorporated community in Virginia, United States

Burnt Chimney is an unincorporated community in Franklin County, Virginia, United States. It was also known as Reverie.

Franklin County, Virginia County in the United States

Franklin County is a county located in the Blue Ridge foothills of the U.S. state of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 56,159. Its county seat is Rocky Mount.

Greek Revival architecture architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries

The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 5 June 2013.
  3. J. Daniel Pezzoni (April 1996). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Waverly" (PDF). Virginia Department of Historic Resources. and Accompanying photo