1925 Northern Ireland general election

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1925 Northern Ireland general election
Ulster Banner.svg
  1921 3 April 1925 1929  

All 52 seats to the House of Commons of Northern Ireland
27 seats were needed for a majority
 First partySecond partyThird party
  James Craig, 1st Viscount Craigavon.jpg Joe Devlin.JPG No image wide.svg
Leader James Craig Joe Devlin Samuel Kyle
Party UUP Nationalist NI Labour
Leader since7 June 192119181925
Leader's seat Down Belfast West Belfast North
Last election40 seats, 66.9%6 seats, 11.8%0 seats, 0.6% [nb 1]
Seats won32103
Seat changeDecrease2.svg8Increase2.svg4Increase2.svg3
Popular vote211,66291,45218,114
Percentage55.0%23.8%4.7%
SwingDecrease2.svg11.9%Increase2.svg12.0%Increase2.svg4.1%

 Fourth partyFifth party
  Eamon de Valera.jpg No image wide.svg
Leader Éamon de Valera
Party Republican Unbought Tenants
Leader since1917n/a
Leader's seat Down None
Last election6 seats, 20.5%Did not stand
Seats won21
Seat changeDecrease2.svg4Increase2.svg1
Popular vote20,6154,886
Percentage5.3%1.3%
SwingDecrease2.svg15.2%New party

1925 Northern Ireland General Election Results Map.png
Results of the 1925 Northern Ireland General Election.

Prime Minister before election

James Craig
UUP

Prime Minister after election

James Craig
UUP

The 1925 Northern Ireland general election was held on 3 April 1925. It was the second election to the Parliament of Northern Ireland. It saw significant losses for the Ulster Unionist Party, although they maintained their large majority. This was the last election for the Stormont parliament conducted using the Proportional Representation system. It was abolished by the Ulster Unionist government during this parliament and replaced with the first-past-the-post system used in Great Britain.

Contents

Results

32104321
UUPNationalistIULabR
1925 Northern Ireland general election
Northern Irish general election 1925.svg
PartyCandidatesVotes
StoodElectedGainedUnseatedNet % of total %No.Net %
  UUP 403208-861.555.0211,662-11.9
  Nationalist 111040+419.223.891,452+12.0
  Ind U 4440+47.79.034,716N/A
  Republican 6204-43.85.320,615-15.2
  NI Labour 3330+35.84.718,114+4.1
  Unbought Tenants 1 1 1 0+11.91.34,886N/A
 Town Tenants' Association 1 000Steady2.svg00.93,320N/A

Electorate 611,683 (512,264 in contested seats); Turnout: 75.1% (384,745).

Votes summary

Popular vote
Ulster Unionist
55.01%
Nationalist Party
23.77%
Independent Unionist
9.02%
Republican
5.36%
Labour
4.71%
Unbought Tenants
1.27%
Tenants Associations
0.86%

Seats summary

Parliamentary seats
Ulster Unionist
61.54%
Nationalist Party
19.23%
Independent Unionist
7.69%
Labour
5.77%
Republican
3.85%
Unbought Tenants
1.92%

Notes

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References