1929 Northern Ireland general election

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1929 Northern Ireland general election
Ulster Banner.svg
  1925 22 May 1929 1933  

All 52 seats to the House of Commons of Northern Ireland
27 seats were needed for a majority
 First partySecond partyThird party
  James Craig, 1st Viscount Craigavon.jpg Joe Devlin.JPG
Leader James Craig Joe Devlin Samuel Kyle
Party UUP Nationalist NI Labour
Leader since7 June 192119181925
Leader's seat North Down Belfast Central Belfast North
(abolished) [fn 1]
Last election32 seat, 55.0%10 seats, 23.8%3 seats, 4.7%
Seats won37111
Seat changeIncrease2.svg5Increase2.svg1Decrease2.svg2
Popular vote148,57934,06923,334
Percentage50.8%11.7%8.0%
SwingDecrease2.svg4.2%Decrease2.svg9.5%Increase2.svg3.3%

Northern Ireland general election 1929.png
Election results by constituency.

Prime Minister before election

James Craig
UUP

Prime Minister after election

James Craig
UUP

The 1929 Northern Ireland general election was held on 22 May 1929. Like all previous elections to the Parliament of Northern Ireland, it produced a large majority for the Ulster Unionist Party. It was the first held after the abolition of proportional representation and the redrawing of electoral boundaries to create single-seat constituencies. As with the rest of the United Kingdom, this has made it more difficult for independent and minor party candidates to win seats.

Contents

Results

371131
UUPNationalistIU
1929 Northern Ireland general election
Northern Irish general election 1929.svg
PartyCandidatesVotes
StoodElectedGainedUnseatedNet % of total %No.Net %
  UUP 4337N/AN/A+571.250.8148,579-4.2
  Ind U 103N/AN/A-15.814.341,778+5.3
  Nationalist 1111N/AN/A+121.211.734,069-9.5
  NI Labour 5 1 N/AN/A-21.98.023,334+3.3
  Ulster Liberal 50N/AN/A-16.218,208+4.9
  Local Option 30N/AN/A03.39,776N/A
 Town Tenants' Association20N/AN/A02.46,901+1.5
  Independent Nationalist 1 0N/AN/A01.33,694N/A
  Independent 1 0N/AN/A01.23,437N/A
  Independent Labour 20N/AN/A00.82,442N/A

Electorate: 775,307 (432,439 in contested seats); Turnout: 67.6% (292,218). Ulster Liberal Party result is compared to Unbought Tenants' Association in 1925.

Votes summary

Popular vote
Ulster Unionist
50.85%
Independent Unionist
14.30%
Nationalist Party
11.66%
Labour
7.99%
Ulster Liberal
6.23%
Independent
3.28%
Other
5.71%

Seats summary

Parliamentary seats
Ulster Unionist
71.15%
Nationalist Party
21.15%
Independent Unionist
5.77%
Labour
1.92%

Footnotes

  1. Kyle stood in Belfast Oldpark but was defeated.

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References