703

Last updated

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
703 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 703
DCCIII
Ab urbe condita 1456
Armenian calendar 152
ԹՎ ՃԾԲ
Assyrian calendar 5453
Balinese saka calendar 624–625
Bengali calendar 110
Berber calendar 1653
Buddhist calendar 1247
Burmese calendar 65
Byzantine calendar 6211–6212
Chinese calendar 壬寅(Water  Tiger)
3399 or 3339
     to 
癸卯年 (Water  Rabbit)
3400 or 3340
Coptic calendar 419–420
Discordian calendar 1869
Ethiopian calendar 695–696
Hebrew calendar 4463–4464
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 759–760
 - Shaka Samvat 624–625
 - Kali Yuga 3803–3804
Holocene calendar 10703
Iranian calendar 81–82
Islamic calendar 83–84
Japanese calendar Taihō 3
(大宝3年)
Javanese calendar 595–596
Julian calendar 703
DCCIII
Korean calendar 3036
Minguo calendar 1209 before ROC
民前1209年
Nanakshahi calendar −765
Seleucid era 1014/1015 AG
Thai solar calendar 1245–1246
Tibetan calendar 阳水虎年
(male Water-Tiger)
829 or 448 or −324
     to 
阴水兔年
(female Water-Rabbit)
830 or 449 or −323
Empress Jito of Japan (645-703) Hyakuninisshu 002.jpg
Empress Jitō of Japan (645–703)

Year 703 ( DCCIII ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 703 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Byzantine Empire

Umayyad Caliphate Second caliphate

The Umayyad Caliphate, also spelt Omayyad, was the second of the four major caliphates established after the death of Muhammad. The caliphate was ruled by the Umayyad dynasty, hailing from Mecca. The third Caliph, Uthman ibn Affan, was a member of the Umayyad clan. The family established dynastic, hereditary rule with Muawiya ibn Abi Sufyan, long-time governor of Syria, who became the sixth Caliph after the end of the First Muslim Civil War in 661. After Mu'awiyah's death in 680, conflicts over the succession resulted in a Second Civil War and power eventually fell into the hands of Marwan I from another branch of the clan. Syria remained the Umayyads' main power base thereafter, and Damascus was their capital.

ʿAbdallāh ibn ʿAbd al-Malik ibn Marwān was an Umayyad prince, the son of Caliph Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan, a general and governor of Egypt.

Mopsuestia

Mopsuestia is an ancient city in Cilicia Campestris on the Pyramus River located approximately 20 km (12 mi) east of ancient Antiochia in Cilicia. From the city's harbour the river is navigable to the Mediterranean Sea, a distance of over 40 km (24 mi).

Europe

Faroald II was the duke of Spoleto from 703, when he succeeded his own father Thrasimund I.

Duchy of Spoleto

The Duchy of Spoleto was a Lombard territory founded about 570 in central Italy by the Lombard dux Faroald. Its capital was the city of Spoleto.

Exarchate of Ravenna

The Exarchate of Ravenna or of Italy was a lordship of the Byzantine Empire in Italy, from 584 to 751, when the last exarch was put to death by the Lombards. It was one of two exarchates established following the western reconquests under Emperor Justinian to more effectively administrate the territories, along with the Exarchate of Africa.

Britain

Loingsech mac Óengusso was an Irish king who was High King of Ireland. Loingsech was a member of the northern Cenél Conaill branch of the Uí Néill. Although his father Óengus had not been High King, his grandfather Domnall mac Áedo had been.

Connacht province in Ireland

Connacht, formerly spelled Connaught, is one of the provinces of Ireland, in the west of the country. Up to the 9th century it consisted of several independent major kingdoms.

Cellach mac Rogallaig was a King of Connacht from the Uí Briúin branch of the Connachta. He was the son of Rogallach mac Uatach, a previous king. He succeeded his nephew Muiredach Muillethan mac Fergusso as king in 702.

By topic

Religion

Wilfrid 7th-century Anglo-Saxon bishop and saint

Wilfrid was an English bishop and saint. Born a Northumbrian noble, he entered religious life as a teenager and studied at Lindisfarne, at Canterbury, in Gaul, and at Rome; he returned to Northumbria in about 660, and became the abbot of a newly founded monastery at Ripon. In 664 Wilfrid acted as spokesman for the Roman position at the Synod of Whitby, and became famous for his speech advocating that the Roman method for calculating the date of Easter should be adopted. His success prompted the king's son, Alhfrith, to appoint him Bishop of Northumbria. Wilfrid chose to be consecrated in Gaul because of the lack of what he considered to be validly consecrated bishops in England at that time. During Wilfrid's absence Alhfrith seems to have led an unsuccessful revolt against his father, Oswiu, leaving a question mark over Wilfrid's appointment as bishop. Before Wilfrid's return Oswiu had appointed Ceadda in his place, resulting in Wilfrid's retirement to Ripon for a few years following his arrival back in Northumbria.

Rome Capital city and comune in Italy

Rome is the capital city and a special comune of Italy. Rome also serves as the capital of the Lazio region. With 2,872,800 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi), it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4,355,725 residents, thus making it the most populous metropolitan city in Italy. Rome is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber. The Vatican City is an independent country inside the city boundaries of Rome, the only existing example of a country within a city: for this reason Rome has been often defined as capital of two states.

Episcopal see the main administrative seat held by a bishop

An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop's ecclesiastical jurisdiction.

Births

An Lushan Chinese general and emperor of Yan

An Lushan was a general in the Tang dynasty and is primarily known for instigating the An Lushan Rebellion.

Chinese people ethnic group

Chinese people are the various individuals or ethnic groups associated with China, usually through ancestry, ethnicity, nationality, citizenship or other affiliation. Han Chinese, the largest ethnic group in China, at about 92% of the population, are often referred to as "Chinese" or "ethnic Chinese" in English, however there are dozens of other related and unrelated ethnic groups in China.

Shi Siming (史思明), or Shi Sugan (史窣干), was a general of the Chinese Tang Dynasty who followed his childhood friend An Lushan in rebelling against Tang, and who later succeeded An Lushan's son An Qingxu as emperor of the Yan state that An Lushan established.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

The 700s decade ran from January 1, 700, to December 31, 709.

710 Year

Year 710 (DCCX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 710 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

802 Year

Year 802 (DCCCII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

745 Year

Year 745 (DCCXLV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 745 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

776 Year

Year 776 (DCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 776 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

785 Year

Year 785 (DCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The article denomination 785 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. It is still used today in this manner.

797 Year

Year 797 (DCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 797 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

815 Year

Year 815 (DCCCXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

818 Year

Year 818 (DCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

834 Year

Year 834 (DCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

851 Year

Year 851 (DCCCLI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

709 Year

Year 709 (DCCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 709 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

702 Year

Year 702 (DCCII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 702 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

700 Year

700 (DCC) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 700th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 700th year of the 1st millennium, the 100th and last year of the 7th century, and the 1st year of the 700s decade. As of the start of 700, the Gregorian calendar was 3 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which was the dominant calendar of the time. The denomination 700 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

592 Year

Year 592 (DXCII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 592 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

735 Year

Year 735 (DCCXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 735 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

960 Year

Year 960 (CMLX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

925 Year

Year 925 (CMXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

912 Year

Year 912 (CMXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

883 Year

Year 883 (DCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Treadgold, Warren T. (1997), A History of the Byzantine State and Society, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, pp. 337–339, ISBN   0-8047-2630-2
  2. 1 2 Venning, Timothy, ed. (2006). A Chronology of the Byzantine Empire. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 189. ISBN   1-4039-1774-4.
  3. Levison England and the Continent pp. 50–51